Moms dealing with elevated lead levels - Page 5 - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#121 of 626 Old 10-11-2005, 01:52 PM
 
Maman*Musique's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 412
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Oh my goodness. I am so sorry.

I would suggest a naturopath for the hair strand test. We haven't done this with our children but we may at some point.

Not sure which state you are in but I think many people qualify for assistance with lead inspection and removal.

Are there agencies in your state who would be able to help you find an attorney for a reduced fee or pro bono?

I wish I could offer more help - i'm sure others will chime in with good advice.
Maman*Musique is offline  
#122 of 626 Old 10-11-2005, 10:33 PM
 
JaneS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 9,114
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ernestholmes
But as I read through this thread I realize the blood tests are temporal and that lead may be hiding in her bones, hair and adipose tissue

HOW DO I GET HER TESTED FOR THIS?

Where does one go to get the hair test? I looked at the link from the yahoo group but its inconclusive - you have to have a doctor do it. What if they won't?

Does anyone know how to get a child's bones tested?
Hair tests can be ordered thru Direct Labs without a doctor.
http://www.directlabs.com/
They have a doctor on staff to order them for you, they are extremely nice, even when they were decimated by Hurricane Katrina!

I would pose these questions on the Yahoo Autism-Mercury list.
http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/Autism-Mercury/
There are so many knowledgable parents who have been through testing/chelation for metals, including lead. There may be some discussions in the archives as well:
http://onibasu.com/archives/am/date_index_1.html

See info here from the group http://home.earthlink.net/~moriam/ "Procedures for testing for mercury and other heavy metals" for information about the Hair Elements Test that is the basic one recommended. If you belong to Autism-Mercury and mention it to Direct Labs, it's is only $69 instead of $93. It will test 16 metals and 34 minerals.
JaneS is offline  
#123 of 626 Old 10-12-2005, 12:56 PM
 
provocativa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 2,794
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
I do think a hair test is a good idea, we never have the extra money. You can sue your landlord. We're getting ready to sue ours, but haven't found a lawyer and don't know how to go about finding a decent one (any help there is appreciated). There is a national lead law, they are supposed to inform you. The EPA has a hotline, check their website. Most local laws are more strict than the national one, which has a loophole for leases under 30 days. The difficulty in suing for damages is that there is not an actuarial table for possible IQ points lost.
I think that you all need to take a deep breath and try to panic less. I remember the panic in myself, it was horrible. A lead level under 10 is not considered harmful. Under 20 used to be the standard, when we were kids. Brain damage doesn't happen until much higher levels- over 40, or really over 70. A better diet, especially high in essential fatty acids as the DAN doctors recommend, is a good step. I think a special X-ray tests the bones. I have not found a doctor who would order it, so probably a DAN doctor or a naturopath is your only bet. I do think those folks at the mercury boards are wise, but not the gospel. I like cilantro, for instance. I do think it very dangerous to vaccinate a child who is exposed to excesses of other heavy metals. I also think it is very important to remember that lead cleaning and lead containment (painting and planting over) do seem to work. My daughter's lead level dropped dramatically, when first we cleaned, and then moved to a lead-contained (Newly painted) older home. A 4 year old playing in the dirt must not be eating it- babies mouth the contaminated soil, that's the danger. It's not so much absorbed through the skin. It seems to me that we may be moving from the frying pan into the fire going to new homes. Vinyl siding? PVC pipes? Synthetic carpets? There are dangers to living surrounded by plastic, too. It has been asserted here that TSP, a very anti-environmental cleaner, is neccessary. This study refutes that assertion: ( http://www.epa.gov/lead/clean.htm ). Incidentaly, this site is interesting, http://www.ledizolv.com/LearnAbout/L.../lszsixarg.asp but it is put up by the people who make the product, which is quite expensive. They give free samples, but I didn't register for one yet. TSP is trisodium phosphate, Cascade is disodium or other sodium phosphates. There is a greater concentration of phosphates in the powder than the liquid, but they are in the liquid too. When dissolved, the TSP would create three sodium ions and three phosphates per molecule, to bind the lead. So the other Cascades would have a lower phosphate level, but they're still there. I found that the liquid left less spotting and was better on antiques, but I used the higher phosphate on windowsills and floors. I don't want to use the phosphates again, but I'm nervous without them, I confess. ernestholmes, I think you should check out the above mentioned boards quickly! According to my extensive research, it certainly seems that lead-induced autism is as likely as mercury-induced. If you vaccinate, it could be a combination. We stopped vaccinating before I found out about the lead. I had been bullied into earlier ones, and am greatful I stopped before she started getting really mobile and her lead exposure increased. Our state lead inspector said that home test kits were worthless, if they only tested for the presence of lead, not its concentration. I sued my landlord for my deposit and won- however, I did give her 30 days notice before moving. Of course, the b*tch hasn't paid me yet and is evading the sheriff, but that's another story.
provocativa is offline  
#124 of 626 Old 10-12-2005, 01:48 PM
 
NoraJadesMama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 273
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Re: Cascade. Do other brands of dishwasher detergent have the right phosphate content?
NoraJadesMama is offline  
#125 of 626 Old 10-12-2005, 04:10 PM
 
JaneS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 9,114
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by provocativa
I am not one to think that because cilantro's effects aren't proven by the medical/ pharmaceutcial/ academic elite machine that they can't also be real and valuable.
I went back to see if I explained this issue since you mentioned it again in a recent post...I meant to expand on it but forgot I think.

I agree with you, I have little use for the "machine" that has caused damage to my health myself. I'll never agree to anything done to me or my family without researching it fully ever again.

The issue that is brought up by the Yahoo group is that the mechanism and ingredient in cilantro that may or may not work to remove metals is unknown.

So therefore it could be dangerous to use b/c generally one does not take it several times a day/night to keep a constant level of whatever ingredient that works in the system... and with chelators, a high level in the blood, followed by a drop, can cause redistribution of the mobilized metals with more going into the brain and organs simply because the body cannot possibly eliminate so much at once. Sometimes in adults, using cilantro or chlorella causes severe migraines, and then you can assume that it is a problem and moving metals into the brain, but in children, they can't articulate their experience all that well.

Just another perspective.
JaneS is offline  
#126 of 626 Old 10-12-2005, 06:33 PM
 
Maman*Musique's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 412
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by provocativa
I think that you all need to take a deep breath and try to panic less. I remember the panic in myself, it was horrible. A lead level under 10 is not considered harmful. Under 20 used to be the standard, when we were kids. Brain damage doesn't happen until much higher levels- over 40, or really over 70
Deep breathing is always good. I'm far from an expert on heavy metal poisoning but I don't trust the state/gov to tell me what is safe. The standard in my state just changed a few years ago. Like vaccines, they often realize one is dangerous after millions have been given it and suffered. I don't want any lead in my daughter's body if I can help it. 13 in my state was enough to have us flagged. Our pediatrician recommended moving or deleading because of the dramatic rise in my daughter's lead level.

Quote:
A better diet, especially high in essential fatty acids as the DAN doctors recommend, is a good step.
My daughter still gets about 80-95% of her nutrition from breastmilk.

Quote:
I do think it very dangerous to vaccinate a child who is exposed to excesses of other heavy metals.
I agree. Luckily we don't vaccinate.

Quote:
I also think it is very important to remember that lead cleaning and lead containment (painting and planting over) do seem to work.
That may or may not be true in each individual case. We were told to leave asap and I think it was a good plan. Once the lead gets in the body, even if it drops in the blood it can still be in the bones/tissue/brain right?
For us, the best plan was to leave immediately. I know we are lucky to have the option.
We did the cleaning at 5.6 but it still rose to 13. The recommended cleaning solution made me sick from the smell so we skipped that. We used the correct vaccuum on a daily basis. Cleaned hands constantly, wiped down molding with wet cloth, etc.

Quote:
My daughter's lead level dropped dramatically, when first we cleaned, and then moved to a lead-contained (Newly painted) older home.
Our home had been painted right before we moved in but it began to chip. I don't believe regular paint will suffice - unless there are many layers?

Quote:
A 4 year old playing in the dirt must not be eating it- babies mouth the contaminated soil, that's the danger. It's not so much absorbed through the skin.
When the soil was dry I imagine he could have breathed it in. Who knows. He has lived in the house for 4.5yrs. We only had him tested at 9mo - we didn't know to test after that. He was 4 and we were told that was normal : (found out later that normal is 0-2)

Quote:
It seems to me that we may be moving from the frying pan into the fire going to new homes. Vinyl siding? PVC pipes? Synthetic carpets?
I think it depends. I won't live with carpeting. Each potential material should be investigated but I believe we are in the fire at the moment so moving/deleading is the only option for us. At least then we have a *chance* of being in a safe environment.

Edited to fix my quote issues
Maman*Musique is offline  
#127 of 626 Old 10-13-2005, 02:06 PM
 
provocativa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 2,794
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
When I was pregnant I gardened in soil often without gloves, that later tested at 5000 or some huge number. This freaked me out, but the state lead inspector and doctor said absorption would have been negligible. Planting grass, or anything- fast growing prickly groundcover of some sort, really really lowers what kids are exposed to- throw some seed down just as a favor to the next folk that live there, if you don't have the house condemned. I don't let mine play next to the house, and will plant there next year. When my daughter first tested for lead, we lived in an old house like yours, M.Musique. No amount of lead cleaning would have made it safe- it had been allowed to deteriorate too much. When I would clean, paint would chip off. There's a room like that in hell, trust me. The only place we could move was another old house, but it has always been fairly well maintained, and the landlord agreed to paint it all and seemed safe. Now the handyman has created a new lead hazard outside (he's not the brightest) so we'll see how the landlord (very kind) responds. I would hate to have to move again, I'm newly pregnant. Very interesting about the chlorella and cilantro. We only made cilantro pesto twice, she would only eat it half the time and it was too expensive to waste. DD has always loved drinking green drinks like Odwalla Superfood. So now that I'm pregnant I bought some powdered greens to mix with juice and smoothies when my diet hasn't been the greatest. We drank some yesterday. Then I had a tiff with my father, and developed a severe stress headache or minor migraine, which is still hanging around. I know stress was the trigger but I bet the chlorella made it much more severe. I rarely get headaches but have had one severe and one not so severe migraine. And most of us know how the pregnancy hormones increase stress and sensitivity. I wonder if anyone makes liquid greens without them.
provocativa is offline  
#128 of 626 Old 10-13-2005, 03:47 PM
 
Maman*Musique's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 412
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by provocativa
Planting grass, or anything- fast growing prickly groundcover of some sort, really really lowers what kids are exposed to- throw some seed down just as a favor to the next folk that live there, if you don't have the house condemned.
In addition to, of course, handing over the lead report to any potential buyer, we will also discuss our soil findings and disclose the fact that our daughter tested above normal for lead.

I have never heard of a house being condemned for lead but I guess it's possible. Ours just needs deleading. Part of our issue was that we wanted every single piece of molding replaced - even the pieces that had an "acceptable" amount of lead in them. We could cut the cost to about $10K by deleading "to code". Someone else may feel comfortable with just doing the minimum deleading. We will probably ask the buyer what they would like to do about the soil. We could do what the inspector suggested (lay mulch or something? I forget) or sod or let them do what they wish.

Good luck to all.
Maman*Musique is offline  
#129 of 626 Old 10-14-2005, 11:55 AM
 
provocativa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 2,794
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Of course. I think like a renter, not a buyer. They have made our former landlord bring everything up to code- it's still vacant 8 months later. I live downtown, and I drive by a deleading project almost daily. It seems like the contractor might know his business, but that the workers (mostly migrant) don't. And the soil and neighbors houses are covered in paint and plaster dust in spite of plastic dropcloths and precautions. How will they ever clean it all up? I totally understand why someone would move rather than deal with that.
provocativa is offline  
#130 of 626 Old 10-14-2005, 05:06 PM - Thread Starter
 
AnoriensMom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Columbus, OH
Posts: 164
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by provocativa
When I would clean, paint would chip off. There's a room like that in hell, trust me.

I used to have nightmares of that room in hell all the time.

The contractors that de-leaded our house did a great job of cleaning up on the inside but not outside. It's not like they could shop-vac the gravel driveway. There are chips of paint, and scrap pieces of the metal they used to cover the outide of the window everywhere. They put mulch about a foot out all around the house, but the debris spread much further.

Narnia, mother of Anorien (10/03) and Ford (5/07)
AnoriensMom is offline  
#131 of 626 Old 10-14-2005, 10:41 PM
 
welldone's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: on our little fledgling farm
Posts: 1,467
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Well, we closed on our "new" 1920s house today. We had a full lead inspection done a few weeks ago, and are anxiously awaiting the results any day now. We were there for a part of the full day that the worker took to test every wall, piece of trim, soil, etc. She had a little box machine thing (please excuse my veeeeery technical language) that is radioactive, I think, and can detect lead through 30 layers of paint, she said. I was shocked when most every wall and piece of trim came up negative.

Does anyone know what that means? Negative, from one of those machine thingies? I asked her if that meant it was lead-free, or just lead-safe, and she kept saying "it's just negative." She did say that she sees a lot of homes test negative, and with the number of older homes in our area, that can't be right. I'm anxious to see how the dust swipes came back. After being in a wretched, lead contaminated apartment for a month, I don't want to move into a house that I'm stuck with for three years minimum.

We're willing to totally remove all the trim and replace it, if necessary. We might have to work seven jobs and wear potato sacks for a few years, but you know...lead safety is a big issue for us. *Sigh.* I guess I just hope the full inspection report clears things up for us, somehow.

~Serina~
Wife to j, homeschooling mom to five wonders

welldone is offline  
#132 of 626 Old 10-15-2005, 01:46 PM
 
provocativa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 2,794
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Our state lead inspector took paint samples, down to the wood, and dust wipes. I don't remember a machine such as you described, but I was busy taling to the nurse that came with him, and crying. Our house was about the same age and there were 55+ layers of paint. I think I would call your state EPA or local health dept and ask them. Our guy had much education- like a chemical engineering degree then his certification, and was very very serious. It was quite reassuring. What good does that do if the 35th layer of paint is lead? As stated before, I think containment often works, but many don't. Maybe her machine isn't functioning properly. I thought almost all homes that old would have lead paint.
provocativa is offline  
#133 of 626 Old 10-15-2005, 04:02 PM
 
welldone's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: on our little fledgling farm
Posts: 1,467
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
She said she used to have to cut paint samples, 2"x2", down to the wood, but commented on how much easier it is now that she doesn't have to do that.

I still haven't received the full inspection report, with all of the actual numbers. That will clear things up, I believe.

~Serina~
Wife to j, homeschooling mom to five wonders

welldone is offline  
#134 of 626 Old 10-16-2005, 06:41 AM
 
Subhuti's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Jeta Grove
Posts: 1,517
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Moms-

We had a lead inspector come into our house. He explained the following: most interiour paint has always been lead free. Lead paint was more expensive and people rarely used it inside unless they were wealthy.

He rarely sees interior paint with lead. He also uses the (highly accurate) method of the handheld radioactive scane that you mentioned. The problem comes when higher quality lead paint (more durable) WAS used inside. This happened in more expensive homes. The other problem is the exterior paint which almost always is full of lead, to give durability. And window sills were painted with more durable lead paint. And sills are the real problem.

Our inspector, very knowledgable, says that the lead in the walls is the POTENTIAL lead. It is not something you are exposed to until the paint brakes down into chips or you do construction. You do not have to worry about it. We've got lead in one bedroom. We are not worried. When we did construction, we just hepa vac-ed (with a NILFISK vac only, see
my earlier threads) very carefully and did other lead-safe practices.

The lead in the lead dust swipes is ACTUAL lead that you are exposed to and IS of concern. You need to clean it up and erradicate the source. But this lead dust can be cleaned up through a true hepa vac (such as nilfisk) and wiping with paper towels. We use baby wipes, as suggested by our lead inspector. Use on per small area, and toss.

Hope this helps, writing this on no sleep, best of luck to all the moms.

We did a lot of reno this summer in our house with lots of lead, and passed most (though not all) the lead swipe tests. Fortunately, Lulu's lead level and mine are low so far. We'll keep testing. We live in a house with lead, but with some simple precautions we can keep it safe. It was expensive to remove the leady windows, but hopefully that was enough. I don't know if I would be so quick to move as you guys... the lead levels don't sound that high (tho scary, I know ) and you're not going to find a lead-free house that easily... Plus, with some simple measures, you can clean up the house fairly well, hopefully.

Best of luck

Kids. I got two of 'em.
Subhuti is offline  
#135 of 626 Old 10-19-2005, 02:05 AM
 
ernestholmes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 258
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hola

So I went to this link but it's all about Mercury - why pray tell ought I bug these souls with my lead issues? Just curious - juts because lead is very exact... its junk doesn't translate to mercury's junk exactly if you know what I am trying to say in my feeble way!

Everyone is telling me (esp. my child's neurologist) that my Great Plains test is twaddle (that is where I ordered the hair test) and will never stand as legal proof. I can't seem to find a doic who will test her hair - because her last blood test was at 4 mcg. BUT I also know that does not mean she didn'teat dirt a year ago and get poisoning then. What to do?




Quote:
Originally Posted by JaneS
Hair tests can be ordered thru Direct Labs without a doctor.
http://www.directlabs.com/
They have a doctor on staff to order them for you, they are extremely nice, even when they were decimated by Hurricane Katrina!

I would pose these questions on the Yahoo Autism-Mercury list.
http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/Autism-Mercury/
There are so many knowledgable parents who have been through testing/chelation for metals, including lead. There may be some discussions in the archives as well:
http://onibasu.com/archives/am/date_index_1.html

See info here from the group http://home.earthlink.net/~moriam/ "Procedures for testing for mercury and other heavy metals" for information about the Hair Elements Test that is the basic one recommended. If you belong to Autism-Mercury and mention it to Direct Labs, it's is only $69 instead of $93. It will test 16 metals and 34 minerals.
ernestholmes is offline  
#136 of 626 Old 10-25-2005, 03:48 PM
 
JaneS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 9,114
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
There are people on that list who have also dealt with high lead.
JaneS is offline  
#137 of 626 Old 10-25-2005, 03:53 PM
 
JaneS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 9,114
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Also if you have an ASD child, that list will be invaluable.
JaneS is offline  
#138 of 626 Old 10-25-2005, 04:08 PM
 
NoraJadesMama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 273
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
CatskillMtnMama : that is what our lead guy explained to us, too.

Well dh traded out a lot of the soil near the garage. we've been no shoes for a while now, and i'm a hepa-vac fanatic (I never thought i'd have feelings for a vacuum). so i'm guessing our baby is low again... when should i have him tested again?

also i spent a great deal of time a few weeks ago de-leading our kitchen floor, three hours maybe, and it was how i used my very limited "special time" that week, and i really enjoyed it. afterwards i was really confused, had i become some kind of demented housewife, getting fulfillment out of housework? and my dh nailed it: "You're nesting," he said. It made me realize that de-leading, although drudgery, is so meaningful because it's a way of caring for my baby, for which us mamas are clearly hard wired. Interesting. (and not what i expected when i was in college!)

good luck all, and hang in there!
NoraJadesMama is offline  
#139 of 626 Old 10-26-2005, 05:31 PM
 
welldone's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: on our little fledgling farm
Posts: 1,467
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Got our lead inspection report today. (We were supposed to get it 10/10.) Hazards exist on the exterior of every window, porch ceilings, etc.; A room in the cellar has lead paint and lead dust hazards; and a few doors have lead paint. The rest of the surfaces in the home--walls, trim, doors--tested negative!

Is that possible? Help me out, lead knowledgeable mamas. When a surface tests negative, that doesn't mean I'm in the clear--that just means the paint has less than 1 mg/sq. cm. What kind of hazard does that "low" level pose?

We're meeting with Healthy Home Resources on Tuesday. They do free abatement and hazard reduction in my area. I hope, hope, hope they can work quickly to make things safe. We're supposed to move in 11/5 - next Saturday!

~Serina~
Wife to j, homeschooling mom to five wonders

welldone is offline  
#140 of 626 Old 10-27-2005, 07:52 PM
 
Subhuti's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Jeta Grove
Posts: 1,517
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Welldone--
yes, its possible, reread my last post. Your lead test results sound exactly like our house. And every other house! It means you need to be aware and careful, but that you should be OK. How did the lead dust swipes turn up?

Liz

Kids. I got two of 'em.
Subhuti is offline  
#141 of 626 Old 10-28-2005, 07:36 PM
 
provocativa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 2,794
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
It seems like I am always contradicting, but what the lead guys say is not always right. Ours performed tests as did yours, but some were wrong. Our floors were painted- peeling in places, even, and he only did a dust wipe because 'interior paint was rarely lead'. But the count came back so high (5500)- that's AFTER lead cleaning and hepa vacuuming 2-3 times, that he said he should have done a paint chip sample. By the time the test came back, we were out of the place, and couldn't get back in to test it. Our landlords owned a floor refinishing company, so of course we thought they would have checked it for lead. And we had a window come back negative, but he was certain it must have had lead. He said it was perhaps a lab mistake, or a sampling mistake. Also, people do dumb things with paint. Like use the kind they're not supposed to (ala, honey, that's the paint for outside the house, or, one of my friends has a drunk handyman- as I'm sure there others, historically). So, even if people didn't use lead paint inside, according to the experts, actually, some of them did. However, I agree with Catskillmama, I wouldn't desert an old house for a lead level as low as some you all are dealing with. But, I was born before 1978 and grew up in an old house. I just love them.
provocativa is offline  
#142 of 626 Old 10-28-2005, 08:26 PM
 
Maman*Musique's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 412
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by provocativa
So, even if people didn't use lead paint inside, according to the experts, actually, some of them did. However, I agree with Catskillmama, I wouldn't desert an old house for a lead level as low as some you all are dealing with. But, I was born before 1978 and grew up in an old house. I just love them.
In my state, close to 80% of homes have interior lead paint.
Maman*Musique is offline  
#143 of 626 Old 11-01-2005, 04:25 PM
 
chickadee79's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: PA
Posts: 432
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hi. Ds had a finger prick Oct 6. I got a phone call yesterday saying that his lead level was 18 and he needed to come in to get a venous draw and that my older 2 should be tested as well. I have read this thread a couple times since yesterday, and first off want to say thank you for all of the information and also for everyone, I have been really worried about this.

How long does it take to typically get results back? We went this morning. I think I was told 48 hours, but I was having a hard time digesting the information, so of course everything I was told is in a big confusing jumble. Dh said I shouldn't be worried about anything until I get the results back and then go from there if there is a cause for concern. That is really hard for me to do, but I am trying.

Can/Should I be doing anything while I am waiting to get the results? Should I get tested since I am nursing? I think I read that unless my level is over 40, then not enough to make a difference is getting through while nursing. I have no insurance otherwise I would have just gone ahead and done it today with the kids. Should I not do anything until I get results back? I have a hard time thinking that it was a gross mistake and that it will come back at a very low level, and so want to do something now since there must be lead here.

Thanks.
chickadee79 is offline  
#144 of 626 Old 11-01-2005, 06:10 PM
 
Maman*Musique's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 412
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by chickadee79
Hi. Ds had a finger prick Oct 6. I got a phone call yesterday saying that his lead level was 18 and he needed to come in to get a venous draw and that my older 2 should be tested as well. I have read this thread a couple times since yesterday, and first off want to say thank you for all of the information and also for everyone, I have been really worried about this.

How long does it take to typically get results back? We went this morning. I think I was told 48 hours, but I was having a hard time digesting the information, so of course everything I was told is in a big confusing jumble. Dh said I shouldn't be worried about anything until I get the results back and then go from there if there is a cause for concern. That is really hard for me to do, but I am trying.

Can/Should I be doing anything while I am waiting to get the results? Should I get tested since I am nursing? I think I read that unless my level is over 40, then not enough to make a difference is getting through while nursing. I have no insurance otherwise I would have just gone ahead and done it today with the kids. Should I not do anything until I get results back? I have a hard time thinking that it was a gross mistake and that it will come back at a very low level, and so want to do something now since there must be lead here.

Thanks.
From everything I have read, finger prick tests are way off.

After testing, I called the Ped's office about 24hrs later and they had the results of our veinous test. I think when I waited for the ped to call it was about 48hrs later. I would put into practice all of the wonderful advice on this thread now. Even though his test could be way off, he might be at a 5 - 10. That is not considered toxic, but it would be a good idea to be proactive anyway. What we did was begin by wiping down our areas we knew had lead paint. We tried the phosphates but the fumes overwhelmed us so we used water. Better than nothing. Also, if you can get a good hepa vacuum like the ones mentioned on this thread, do so. I think your state might be able to help with the financing of that if you qualify. Leave shoes at the door if they might be tracking in soil with lead in it. Wash hands and toys a LOT.

I will be keeping my fingers crossed for you and your little ones. Keep us updated.
Maman*Musique is offline  
#145 of 626 Old 11-01-2005, 06:27 PM
 
chickadee79's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: PA
Posts: 432
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thanks so much for the reply. I am definitely going to start wiping everything down today. As far as the vac goes, we have one that says it has the proper filter, but I remember not paying too too much for it, so it probably isn't the best, but it is better than nothing right? Or would it be doing more harm even using it? We certainly cannot afford one of the ones recommended here but wow, would I ever love to have one!

It is so overwhelming about where to start. Our house is pretty big, and pretty old(100+). I guess just work my way from room to room, probably take a couple days!

I will definitely keep you updated, and will probably be calling the dr's office tomorrow afternoon to find if they have the results yet. Thanks again.
chickadee79 is offline  
#146 of 626 Old 11-03-2005, 07:21 PM
 
chickadee79's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: PA
Posts: 432
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Here is an update.

Ds1 and Dd have levels of 3. Ds2 has a level of 14. They are going to retest in Jan. I was told that since the other 2 have low levels that it is probably not the house, but could be something that Ds2 has/uses that the other 2 do not. The only thing that I can think of is the fact that Ds2 is nursing and the other 2 are not. My mom thought the same thing when I told her. I am planning on calling back and asking if I should get tested. So, if not, then I just have to wait until Jan to find out if his levels are rising or falling.

I hope everyone is doing well.
chickadee79 is offline  
#147 of 626 Old 11-03-2005, 07:28 PM
 
Maman*Musique's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 412
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hi Chickadee,

About the vacuum, if it is an upright it could do more harm than good because, as I understand it, uprights actually send the dust around the house as it vacuums. Canister vacuums are apparently much safer.

About your youngest having higher lead levels, that is normal. Babies that age are putting things in their mouth and spending lots of time on the floor, presumably. My 4.5yo has a 1.5 level and my 15mo tested at 13. Our ped also explained that different bodies metabolize it differently.

I have never thought of testing myself and I am nursing. I don't think that would be the likely culprit. Anyone know about that?
Maman*Musique is offline  
#148 of 626 Old 11-03-2005, 11:49 PM
 
chickadee79's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: PA
Posts: 432
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Yes it is an upright. Would using dh's shopvac be any better? It has a hepa filter.

I had read somewhere on the net while looking for more info about this, that it can come through breastmilk, but I think it said only if the mother's levels were above 40 or something. Under that not enough to make a difference gets through. I'll have to try to find that info again. I'll post again if I do.

Has anyone tried a home lead test kit from Lowe's or Home Depot or someplace like that? Is it worth it to try? I am having a hard time just saying "ok, we will retest in Jan la-de-da" you know? I just don't know where to go from here except wait and that is really hard for me, not knowing something, or not doing something. I don't even know what the lead problem is to correct it.
chickadee79 is offline  
#149 of 626 Old 11-04-2005, 12:02 AM
 
chickadee79's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: PA
Posts: 432
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Ok. Found some. Not what I thought i remembered, so thats good.

Quote:
What has been found, is that the lead levels in breast milk are related to the lead levels in a mother's blood, but breast milk contains only 5% or less of this amount.
Quote:
There is much controversy over how much lead is in breast milk, however, experts all agree that breastfeeding should continue unless there has been severe lead poisoning diagnosed in the mother during her life. Artificial baby milks and cow's milk also contain lead. (Abadin HG., Hibbs BF., Pohl HR. 1997, Newman J. 1992, Rabinowitz M., Leviton A., Needleman H. 1985). Reducing your exposure and continuing to breastfeed is the most effective way of limiting your baby’s risk of lead exposure.
Quote:
If the blood lead levels are <10 µg/dL then there should be no cause for concern as the amount of lead in breast milk should be only about 5% - or probably less - of that in her blood (Gulson et al., submitted). As an example, Baum and Shannon (1996) describe two subjects in the USA whose blood leads were 34 and 29 µg/dL. The breast milk contained <10 ppb (see Table 1). If a mother’s blood lead level is above 20 µg/dL, it is recommended that a test of the breast milk should be undertaken.

Even if wholly breast feeding, at these low levels, the impact on blood lead of the infant will be small (estimations based on the Physiologically based Pharmacokinetic Model of Ellen O’Flaherty of the University of Cincinnati Medical Centre 1995).
So, looks like unless I have really high levels, not enough to matter is getting through to Ds. If I had high enough levels, I would know, right? Even without a bloodtest, I would know?
chickadee79 is offline  
#150 of 626 Old 11-04-2005, 09:29 AM
 
Maman*Musique's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 412
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Also, I would think it would be likely that your level is the same or below that of your older children. I am assuming mine is in line with my 4.5yo who is 1.5. Even taking into account the fact that different bodies metablize lead differently, I would think it would be in a similar range. Less even, since I am larger than them. I'm no expert though, just guessing.
Maman*Musique is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off