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Asthma in toddlers


This topic was originally posted in this forum: Alternative and Complementary Medicine
Author Topic: Asthma in toddlers
ligia ribeiro bernardet
Member posted 07-07-2000 05:21 AM
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I have a 20 month old daughter that has been diagnosed twice with bronquiolitis. This is a form of alergic asthma. The doctor does not call it asthma because asthma is a chronic disease, and in her case she does not know if it will be chronic or not.
Her symptoms are bronchio-spasm (contraction of the bronquios), very mild shortness of breath and a lot of mucous in the chest. Her general activity level is fine, she eats well and is a happy child.

She is being treated with conventional medicine (beta-blockers, bronchio expanders and anti-inflamatories) but I would like to start a natural treatment to prevent new occurrences.

I have not taken the step of asthma-proofing my house. We live in Brasilia, Brazil. The doctor wants me to throw all couches and stuffed animals out, get rid of cat and dog etc. Just seems so extreme. Or am I in denial?

Any ideas?

Ligia



Esther
Junior Member posted 07-07-2000 10:40 PM
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Re: Asthma in toddlers
My 3.5 yr old was asthmatic from birth. I had tried 2 different homeopaths, and several different remedies. We finally found the right remedy around October 1999. He was asthma free until March, when he consumed large amounts of green dyed colored food for a St. Patricks Day party. He relapsed briefly. We had started on the Feingold Diet (see www.feingold.org) and Mothering magazines article on ADHD and diet, for my older son who was diagnosed ADHD, about six months ago. The health benefit of eating foods without artificial preservatives, flavors, colors as well as a few other things, has been felt through the whole family. I haven't changed anything else at home. I put myself on the diet too, and my headbanging, non sleeping breastfed 19 month old baby changed too. She no longer bangs her head when angry, and she naps during the day. You can access all the information free of charge by checking into the website. Good luck, and good health.




Cynthia in Arabia
Moderator posted 07-09-2000 05:20 AM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hi Ligia,

One of my children had bronchial difficulties as a baby but fortunately it is under control now. It started out as bronchiolitis which, according to my medical texts, is a lower respiratory viral infection involving widespread inflammation of the bronchi and bronchioles, the small airways that are in the lungs. The viral infection causes these airways to swell, produce mucus and possibly spasms and contractions just as occurs with asthma. My son was treated with basically the same medications as your daughter is being treated. There was not much improvement and attacks were frequent. We went from doctor to doctor searching for someone who could offer something new. We finally found a specialist who informed us that the bronchiolitis was now actually asthma and was probably helped into being by the drugs he had been given. He changed the medications and included desensitization injections which started out weekly and over the course of two years faded to monthly until completed. It did help but if I knew then what I know now I probably wouldn't have gone the allopathic medications route. His asthma still exists but attacks are rare. I discovered that giving him a peppermint patty to suck on helped with a mild attack. I have also found a homeopathic remedy that helps. We now reserve the drugs for a serious event and own a nebulizer because of the severity of the attacks he faced in the past. But basically we have become aware of exactly what he is sensitive to and we try to avoid those things as much as possible, particularly cats and cigarette smoke. Now his attacks are extremely rare - once or twice a year perhaps.

My advise would be to take your doctor's advise about asthma-proofing your house and lifestyle- at least to start with. That is the very first step in natural treatment. It does seem unreasonable to get rid of your couches. Perhaps you could give them a good cleaning and then put a thick, washable cover over them for day-to-day living. Frequent washing of the cover will do away with any irritants that may collect and threaten your daughter's sensitivities. There are many things that you can do that are not drastic. If you have drapes that you only wash seasonally you could pack them away and put up machine washable ones (I've used sheets in a pinch ) Replace feather or cotton bed pillows with hypo-allergenic ones or at least polyester-filled ones. Keep only stuffed animals that are washable and wash them frequently in water hot enough to kill dust mites. Because you can't do the same as successfully with animals I'd put pets outside or give them away. Change bedding frequently. An air filtration system is also very beneficial. If you can't afford it for the entire house then at least one for your child's bedroom which can be moved to whatever room she is playing in during the day. I know that sounds too defining for an active toddler, but if it helps you may find keeping the things that interest her in the area of the house where you're running the air filter. If you find that these simple measures reduce her attacks then you know you're on the right track. Keep searching. When she has an attack think of what might have brought it on. Carpet can be a source of problems too because it can hold so much that irritates her. I know replacing carpet can be a crippling expense so I would suggest you try all of other suggestions first, keep your carpets very, very clean, and see if there's improvement.

Did your doctor give you any dietary advise? Because your daughter has excess mucous production I would make sure she doesn't get any milk or milk products nor any products that contain milk such as breads. Bake your own breads, cakes, cookies and such without milk. She should always get plenty of water to help thin secretions. And if her attacks are excessive I'd suggest keeping a food diary to help pinpoint any problem foods. Include everything that enters her mouth and make notes of her attacks in this diary whenever they occur.

As for natural treatments, I can suggest thyme tea to help thin the secretions. A thyme bath is a possibility if your child won't drink the tea. Or 5 drops of thyme or eucalyptus tincture mixed with a little olive oil and massaged into her back will help her relax and breathe easier. Esther's suggestion of homeopathic remedies is also a possibility. Do you have a homeopath or naturopath in your area that you can consult? I would also suggest that you try to strengthen her immune system. You can give her astragalus for this, one-half the recommended dosage three times a day for two weeks. Begin this when she does not have a fever or infection. Another possibility is NAET which is a muscle testing and acupressure treatment for allergies. You'll find info on this at www.naet.com

Good luck to you and your family.

Cynthia


ligia ribeiro bernardet
Member posted 07-10-2000 12:24 PM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
HI,
I really appreciated the replies. It is great to be able to exchange ideas with other people.

I could not access the diet site suggested by Esther. There might be a problem with the server. But I understood the general idea: avoid junk food. We are somewhat natural eaters, but in Brazil it is much harder than in the US to find organic foods.

I will look into asthma-proofing my house. I do have n an indoors cat, and I have no idea how to part with him. The doctor recommended a dust-mite shampoo. I may try that. He will not like it!!

The doctor made no dietary suggestions, except drinking fluids. I put Alici on goat's milk. Is it less allergenic? The doctor said that was unimportant.

I use a humidifier, and I may get a purifier. The weather here is extremely dry half of the year. The other half it pours continuosly. On the dry season, there are a a lot of fires around, and the air gets thick. Really thick.

Alici never really had an attack. Her condition seems to come slowly. She has a cold, and produces a lot of mucous, her breathing gets shallow, but she is still functioning just fine. I take her to the doctor, and she is diagnosed with bronchiolitis. So I'd characterize it as a mild condition. Both times she got the diagnostic I was surprised to know that she
was having an "attack".

Well thanks again for the advice, and if you have other sites of alternative medicine to point me to I would appreciate.

Ligia



Cynthia in Arabia
Moderator posted 07-28-2000 06:23 AM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Seems the poly-filled pillows are not such a good idea after all. Dr. Mercola's Optimal Wellness newsletter has an article on this topic. Do a search for "pillows" on his site - www.mercola.com and it should come up.
edited to remove the full article.

~Cynthia

[This message has been edited by Cynthia in Arabia (edited 07-25-2001).]



Chava
Member posted 07-28-2000 01:50 PM
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Bronchiolitis is *not* an allergic condition, but a result of a virus - usually RSV. If this is the case, then your daughter will probably outgrow the problem by around the 2 year mark. If it is reactive airway disease (asthma) it may be a more chronic problem and you may need to consult an allergist to identify triggers. There are other respiratory diseases that look like repeats of bronchiolitis that your dr. should rule out.


ligia ribeiro bernardet
Member posted 07-31-2000 06:46 AM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The comment by Chava is very interesting. I searched bronchiolitis on the Internet and found the same answer: it is *NOT* an allergic disease. But the doctor insists that it is.
My daughter has been through several allegy tests and she did NOT test positive, which reinforces Chava's thesis.

Which other diseases were you thinking when you said that there are diseases that might look like bronchiolitis?

Ligia



Chava
Member posted 07-31-2000 11:15 AM
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The diseases to be ruled out would be pneumonia and CF. However the most likely scenario would be an infection with RSV in infancy (most common in winter) or other virus, and then subsequent respiratory problems until around age 2.
In health,
Chava



christine
Member posted 09-01-2000 11:12 AM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
HI! MY THREE CHILDREN AND I ALL HAVE HAD REACTIVE ASTHMA. MY TWO GIRLS BOTH GOT BRONCHIOLITIS AND RELATED AILMENTS TWICE. BOTH HAD MILD ASTHMA AFTER THESE AILMENTS FOR MONTHS. THE DOCTORS PRESCRIBED ALBUTEROL (ORAL OR INHALED). MY DAUGHTER WOULD TURN BLUE FROM IT, CRY AND SAID IT BURNED. AFTER THE FIRST COURSE OF THIS, I REFUSED TO ADMINISTER IT AND HAD TO CHANGE DOCTORS A FEW TIMES UNTIL I FOUND ONE WHO COULD HELP ME. SHE IS AN MD FROM CHINA WHO IS COMFORTABLE WITH BOTH HERBS AND PHARMACUETICALS. SHE PRESCRIBED LOBELLIA FOR THE BRONCHOSPASMS AND AN ALLERGY FREE DIET. I ALSO COVERED MY BEDS, PILLOWS ETC, VACUMED AND DUSTED CONTANTLY ETC. FOR US, THE LOBELLIA WORKS WONDERS. WHEN I WAS PREGNANT, MY ASTHMA BECAME SEVERE. I DIDN'T WANT THE INHALER SO I TRIED THE HERB. IT WAS MIRACULOUS-JUST AS EFFECTIVE BUT TOOK UP TO 30MIN TO WORK. I USE THE HERBS THAT MY DOCTOR RECOMMENDS AND I LOVE THE QUALITY OF PRODUCTS. I HAVE NO ASSOCIATION WITH THE COMPANY BUT I DON'T THINK I CAN NAME THEM ON THIS SITE SO IF YOU ARE INTERESTED, EMAIL ME AND I'LL LET YOU KNOW. ALSO, MY 5 YEAR OLD SEEMS TO HAVE OUTGROWN THIS PROBLEM.
BEST OF LUCK.


Cynthia in Arabia
Moderator posted 09-03-2000 02:21 AM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
True Christine, most children do seem to outgrow asthma. Mine did to an extent. His flareups are very rare and only when exposed to something he is highly sensitive to, which in his case is cats. Living in Arabia he doesn't face much difficulty since keeping pets is not a habit as it is in other countries. But he has a terrible time when we go home to visit family in the US.
I am assuming that he became less and less sensitive to other allergens as he got older so perhaps that is the natural course of asthma in children.

~Cynthia

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Old 01-08-2002, 07:40 AM - Thread Starter
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Alternative and Complementary Medicine Archive
albuterol, necessary?


This topic was originally posted in this forum: Alternative and Complementary Medicine
Author Topic: albuterol, necessary?
leafylady

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This topic was originally posted in this forum: Alternative and Complementary Medicine
Author Topic: albuterol, necessary?
leafylady
Member posted 02-14-2001 05:03 AM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Hi,
My son has a lingering cough after the whole family had the flu. The doc diagnosed it as mild bronchitis and "reactive airways" (caused by this flu).
So, she prescribed antibiotics, which I'm not opposed to in this case. (We waited the cough out for 10 days and generally live in a healthy manner.) She also prescribed nebulizer treatments with albuterol until the cough goes away. Is the albuterol definitely necessary or do you think just keeping a vaporizer going would have the same effect? He's not wheezing.



Peacemama
Member posted 02-14-2001 06:30 AM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I am not a doctor, but I do have 3 kids... I thought albuterol was only for emergencies to open the bronchials, like if an asthmatic unexpectedly encounteres an allergen and needs immediate relief. We have had bronchitis a few times, and antibiotics did the trick. We also drink a nice soothing tea like Traditional Med's throat coat, or this homemade formula:
peppermint
nettles
anise seed
slippery elm
thyme
coltsfoot

plus tincture of echinacea, and another of comfrey leaf and root

Hope you feel better! Do lots of drinking and steaming! Love, Peacemama



sagewinna
Member posted 02-14-2001 08:33 AM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
As a mom with 2 asthmatic kids, I can tell you that there doesn't have to be wheezing present for you child to be having trouble breathing. Some types of coughs can be just as much a symptom of airways being reactive. Steam will not help reactive airways (In my experience) but will help other kinds of coughs.
Why don't you call the Dr. and ask what the albuterol will do for your child? Just because the appointment is over doesn't mean you can't still ask questions!



megerina
Member posted 02-14-2001 09:12 AM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I am asthmatic and have an asthmatic child and had an asthmatic parent. The wheeze definitly doesn't have to be present for a problem breathing, believe me.
Call your Doc and ask, but I would watch your child too. I can tell when my duaghter's intal isn't enough to control when she starts coughing, or just starts being very tired and not bouncing off the walls, she is a tigger-child normally. That's when we haul out the albuterol.

I can tell on me when I just can't quite seem to catch my breath. My dad could be totally quit and you wouldn't realize anything was wrong until you saw his skin tone and the panic in his eyes. He didn't like to "bother us" with needing help, but would wind up falling over necessitating an ER run.

I agree that albuterol can have some obnoxious side effects but a breathing child is a good thing.




lovewend
Member posted 02-14-2001 09:37 AM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
My doctor recently told us that albuterol is now part of their 'standard' treatment for bronchitis. I haven't used it for my kids for a few reasons--not the least of which are the yucky side-effects that I experienced when I used it briefly to control pre-term labor. Side effects for me included irritability, nervousness, dry mouth, sleeplessness, etc. (what a nasty passel of side effects for a woman on bedrest with toddlers underfoot!) By all means, call your doctor back with your questions--ask what its intended to help and what side-effects to watch for.


lovewend
Member posted 02-14-2001 09:39 AM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
My doctor recently told us that albuterol is now part of their 'standard' treatment for bronchitis. I haven't used it for my kids for a few reasons--not the least of which are the yucky side-effects that I experienced when I used it briefly to control pre-term labor. Side effects for me included irritability, nervousness, dry mouth, sleeplessness, etc. (what a nasty passel of side effects for a woman on bedrest with toddlers underfoot!) By all means, call your doctor back with your questions--ask what its intended to help (and whether those symptoms can be expected to resolve without the albuterol)and what side-effects to watch for.


leafylady
Member posted 02-14-2001 04:15 PM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
wow, thanks for all of the fast input!
I didn't realize that wheezing wasn't necessarily associated with reactive airways or trouble breathing. I always thought that type of thing would be very obvious.
He hasn't been bouncing off the walls quite as much as he usually does, although he's plenty active.

Yes, I'll call back and ask more about the albuterol. I suspect that as lovewend said about her doc, that the albuterol may be a standard treatment for a bronchitis diagnosis at our clinic too.



megerina
Member posted 02-14-2001 04:32 PM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
lovewend,
One interesting thing about albuterol, at least the inhaled kind, is it typically doesn't give those nasty, shaky side effects when one really needs it. The oral stuff is a whole nother animal.

having spent 10 weeks on and off terbutaline I can really identify with the pill's side effects, and am really glad my kid only got the inhaled format. We referred to the oral medication as "anxiety attack in a pill" for good reason, but that anxiety is what helps slow preterm labor.



Mom2Will/Kate
Member posted 02-14-2001 05:58 PM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Leafylady -
I just went through the same thing with my 5.5yo ds.

He had a cold that turned into a horrible cough that went on all day and night. After 3 days of coughing, with no relief in sight, we went to the Doctor. We were perscribed oral albuterol, (syrup form) to give daily, every 4-6 hours as needed. I tried it once, and didn't see any relief at all. After a few more hours of horrible coughing, etc., I called the oncall Doctor, and he ordered a nebulizer with albuterol.

Although the albuterol made ds cough harder at first, (and act a little bit hyper) we definately noticed positive effects after use. We gave ds 4 nebulizer treatments in 2.5 days, and were very happy with the results.

I would encourage you to ask more questions if needed, but I know how incredibly worn out our ds was after so much coughing. His whole body was sore, and he actually vomited a few times from all the coughing.

Good luck to you with this desicion.



copslass
Member posted 02-14-2001 06:02 PM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Great recipe for an herbal assist!
My 3rd was experiencing asthmatic symptoms, I have suffered with asthma all my life, happened to have him with me when I took an older child to the chiropractor. Chiro heard him wheezing, took one look and exclaimed the op/occiput transverse position ds was born in! Birth postition may or may not be your case, but this chiro gave ds several adjustments, ds is 11 yrs. old now, never had another problem! Worth considering, IMHO.


christine
Member posted 02-14-2001 07:16 PM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Leafylady
I have been in the same situation about 4 times with my 3 kids. My oldest had a reaction to albuterol so I subsequently asked. I have been told by 4 different doctors that it would not cure anything, just make the child more comfortable. I have asthma myself and have refused the steroids and inhalers. What I use is lobellia from 1800herbdoc. My pediatrician prescribed it when I asked for albuterol alternatives. It owrks like a charm on them and on me...I am totally inhaler free.
And of course, no dairy products during this time.
Christine





Mom2Will/Kate
Member posted 02-15-2001 07:15 AM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Christine -
Wow! Thanks for the tip on alternatives to albuterol. Next time we're having trouble, we'll give it a try.

Does everybody need a perscription, or can one just call the 1-800 number?



astout
Member posted 02-15-2001 12:09 PM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
you dont say how old your child is- we went through the same thing. both girls got the awful cough (4.5 and 3mo at the timr). but the three mo. old had it pretty bad. I tried waiting it out with steam, etc.- but when she began vomitting more thsn 2x a day due to cough- i took her in. doc said she was having apretty hard time breathing and her already tiny airways were pinched pretty small. That freaked me out. He prescribed albut. with a nebulizer and we did it. took about 4 days of treatments and was pretty touch and go- I thought we'd end up in the hospital- esp. because she still would throw up. perhaps next time whenshe and her airways ate bigger i will try alternatives. I also gaver a reduced dose than was prescribed. I guess listen to your instincts- but for me I think this sit. needed the albuterol.
Amanda


leafylady
Member posted 02-15-2001 12:56 PM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
My son is 14 mo. old, not old enough to talk so he can't tell me if there are any side effects or how good/bad he feels. We convinced him that the nebulizer was a good toy to keep in his mouth, at least for a little while. He seems to like it, so I wonder if he can feel a difference in his breathing when he uses it, or if it's just a nifty toy to him. It does seem to be helping with the cough. Luckily he hasn't been to a point of vomiting from the coughing.




christine
Member posted 02-15-2001 01:55 PM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Kate
You don't need a prescription.
_christine



sagewinna
Member posted 02-15-2001 06:55 PM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The easiest way to give a breathing treatment when my kids were tots was while they were nursing, or asleep!


Member posted 02-14-2001 05:03 AM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Hi,
My son has a lingering cough after the whole family had the flu. The doc diagnosed it as mild bronchitis and "reactive airways" (caused by this flu).
So, she prescribed antibiotics, which I'm not opposed to in this case. (We waited the cough out for 10 days and generally live in a healthy manner.) She also prescribed nebulizer treatments with albuterol until the cough goes away. Is the albuterol definitely necessary or do you think just keeping a vaporizer going would have the same effect? He's not wheezing.



Peacemama
Member posted 02-14-2001 06:30 AM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I am not a doctor, but I do have 3 kids... I thought albuterol was only for emergencies to open the bronchials, like if an asthmatic unexpectedly encounteres an allergen and needs immediate relief. We have had bronchitis a few times, and antibiotics did the trick. We also drink a nice soothing tea like Traditional Med's throat coat, or this homemade formula:
peppermint
nettles
anise seed
slippery elm
thyme
coltsfoot

plus tincture of echinacea, and another of comfrey leaf and root

Hope you feel better! Do lots of drinking and steaming! Love, Peacemama



sagewinna
Member posted 02-14-2001 08:33 AM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
As a mom with 2 asthmatic kids, I can tell you that there doesn't have to be wheezing present for you child to be having trouble breathing. Some types of coughs can be just as much a symptom of airways being reactive. Steam will not help reactive airways (In my experience) but will help other kinds of coughs.
Why don't you call the Dr. and ask what the albuterol will do for your child? Just because the appointment is over doesn't mean you can't still ask questions!



megerina
Member posted 02-14-2001 09:12 AM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I am asthmatic and have an asthmatic child and had an asthmatic parent. The wheeze definitly doesn't have to be present for a problem breathing, believe me.
Call your Doc and ask, but I would watch your child too. I can tell when my duaghter's intal isn't enough to control when she starts coughing, or just starts being very tired and not bouncing off the walls, she is a tigger-child normally. That's when we haul out the albuterol.

I can tell on me when I just can't quite seem to catch my breath. My dad could be totally quit and you wouldn't realize anything was wrong until you saw his skin tone and the panic in his eyes. He didn't like to "bother us" with needing help, but would wind up falling over necessitating an ER run.

I agree that albuterol can have some obnoxious side effects but a breathing child is a good thing.




lovewend
Member posted 02-14-2001 09:37 AM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
My doctor recently told us that albuterol is now part of their 'standard' treatment for bronchitis. I haven't used it for my kids for a few reasons--not the least of which are the yucky side-effects that I experienced when I used it briefly to control pre-term labor. Side effects for me included irritability, nervousness, dry mouth, sleeplessness, etc. (what a nasty passel of side effects for a woman on bedrest with toddlers underfoot!) By all means, call your doctor back with your questions--ask what its intended to help and what side-effects to watch for.


lovewend
Member posted 02-14-2001 09:39 AM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
My doctor recently told us that albuterol is now part of their 'standard' treatment for bronchitis. I haven't used it for my kids for a few reasons--not the least of which are the yucky side-effects that I experienced when I used it briefly to control pre-term labor. Side effects for me included irritability, nervousness, dry mouth, sleeplessness, etc. (what a nasty passel of side effects for a woman on bedrest with toddlers underfoot!) By all means, call your doctor back with your questions--ask what its intended to help (and whether those symptoms can be expected to resolve without the albuterol)and what side-effects to watch for.


leafylady
Member posted 02-14-2001 04:15 PM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
wow, thanks for all of the fast input!
I didn't realize that wheezing wasn't necessarily associated with reactive airways or trouble breathing. I always thought that type of thing would be very obvious.
He hasn't been bouncing off the walls quite as much as he usually does, although he's plenty active.

Yes, I'll call back and ask more about the albuterol. I suspect that as lovewend said about her doc, that the albuterol may be a standard treatment for a bronchitis diagnosis at our clinic too.



megerina
Member posted 02-14-2001 04:32 PM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
lovewend,
One interesting thing about albuterol, at least the inhaled kind, is it typically doesn't give those nasty, shaky side effects when one really needs it. The oral stuff is a whole nother animal.

having spent 10 weeks on and off terbutaline I can really identify with the pill's side effects, and am really glad my kid only got the inhaled format. We referred to the oral medication as "anxiety attack in a pill" for good reason, but that anxiety is what helps slow preterm labor.



Mom2Will/Kate
Member posted 02-14-2001 05:58 PM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Leafylady -
I just went through the same thing with my 5.5yo ds.

He had a cold that turned into a horrible cough that went on all day and night. After 3 days of coughing, with no relief in sight, we went to the Doctor. We were perscribed oral albuterol, (syrup form) to give daily, every 4-6 hours as needed. I tried it once, and didn't see any relief at all. After a few more hours of horrible coughing, etc., I called the oncall Doctor, and he ordered a nebulizer with albuterol.

Although the albuterol made ds cough harder at first, (and act a little bit hyper) we definately noticed positive effects after use. We gave ds 4 nebulizer treatments in 2.5 days, and were very happy with the results.

I would encourage you to ask more questions if needed, but I know how incredibly worn out our ds was after so much coughing. His whole body was sore, and he actually vomited a few times from all the coughing.

Good luck to you with this desicion.



copslass
Member posted 02-14-2001 06:02 PM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Great recipe for an herbal assist!
My 3rd was experiencing asthmatic symptoms, I have suffered with asthma all my life, happened to have him with me when I took an older child to the chiropractor. Chiro heard him wheezing, took one look and exclaimed the op/occiput transverse position ds was born in! Birth postition may or may not be your case, but this chiro gave ds several adjustments, ds is 11 yrs. old now, never had another problem! Worth considering, IMHO.


christine
Member posted 02-14-2001 07:16 PM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Leafylady
I have been in the same situation about 4 times with my 3 kids. My oldest had a reaction to albuterol so I subsequently asked. I have been told by 4 different doctors that it would not cure anything, just make the child more comfortable. I have asthma myself and have refused the steroids and inhalers. What I use is lobellia from 1800herbdoc. My pediatrician prescribed it when I asked for albuterol alternatives. It owrks like a charm on them and on me...I am totally inhaler free.
And of course, no dairy products during this time.
Christine





Mom2Will/Kate
Member posted 02-15-2001 07:15 AM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Christine -
Wow! Thanks for the tip on alternatives to albuterol. Next time we're having trouble, we'll give it a try.

Does everybody need a perscription, or can one just call the 1-800 number?



astout
Member posted 02-15-2001 12:09 PM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
you dont say how old your child is- we went through the same thing. both girls got the awful cough (4.5 and 3mo at the timr). but the three mo. old had it pretty bad. I tried waiting it out with steam, etc.- but when she began vomitting more thsn 2x a day due to cough- i took her in. doc said she was having apretty hard time breathing and her already tiny airways were pinched pretty small. That freaked me out. He prescribed albut. with a nebulizer and we did it. took about 4 days of treatments and was pretty touch and go- I thought we'd end up in the hospital- esp. because she still would throw up. perhaps next time whenshe and her airways ate bigger i will try alternatives. I also gaver a reduced dose than was prescribed. I guess listen to your instincts- but for me I think this sit. needed the albuterol.
Amanda


leafylady
Member posted 02-15-2001 12:56 PM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
My son is 14 mo. old, not old enough to talk so he can't tell me if there are any side effects or how good/bad he feels. We convinced him that the nebulizer was a good toy to keep in his mouth, at least for a little while. He seems to like it, so I wonder if he can feel a difference in his breathing when he uses it, or if it's just a nifty toy to him. It does seem to be helping with the cough. Luckily he hasn't been to a point of vomiting from the coughing.




christine
Member posted 02-15-2001 01:55 PM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Kate
You don't need a prescription.
_christine



sagewinna
Member posted 02-15-2001 06:55 PM
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The easiest way to give a breathing treatment when my kids were tots was while they were nursing, or asleep!

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Old 01-08-2002, 09:23 AM - Thread Starter
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Alternative and Complementary Medicine Archive
alternative asthma therapies



This topic was originally posted in this forum: Alternative and Complementary Medicine
Author Topic: alternative asthma therapies
jaksmommy
Member posted 03-21-2001 09:40 AM
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My 20 month old breastfed toddler was diagnosed with asthma last week and prescribed the usual allopathic course of albuterol,Benadryl,and Robitussin. The effects of these meds are worse than the dry cough. Any alternative suggestions would be appreciated.


lisamarie
Member posted 03-21-2001 11:05 AM
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My ds was diagnosed with allergy induced asthma (officially), last year. We have done some major allergy proofing of his room. Limited the stuffed animals and putting them in the dryer once a week, vacuuming regularly and no pets (dogs) sleeping in his room , we bought special allergy mattress, pillowcase and comforter covers and we put a HEPA filter in his room for the night (my ds is 4.5 yrs. old). We also wash his sheets/comforter, etc. in hot water once a week. He is on prescription oral asthma meds. tablet called Singulair, but we also do some natural things. He takes an omega 3 gel caps once a day. The fish oil is suppose to help with the muscus production. Its by Nordic Naturals and its for kids. Its strawberry flavored gel caps (natural) and he just chews them. My ds calls them "juice bugs"! We also do chiropractic care and massage. This has been the first year since he was 2, that he hasn't had pneumonia!!!!!!!!!!!!!! We are so happy and pleased. Its so hard to see your child struggle for air and cough. And we haven't had to use the albuterol and the nebulizer (sp?) in a year!!!!! Good luck!


christine
Member posted 03-24-2001 06:35 AM
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I have used lobellia very successfully for asthma. My pediatrician recommended it when I refused albuterol (it made my dd sick). I use the lobellia on myself- my doc prescribed steroids and an inhaler for me.
I just use the herb as needed.


jaksmommy
Member posted 03-28-2001 04:40 PM
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Thanks so much lisamarie and christine for the asthma info. I'd forgotten about using the dryer to kill dust mites. I'll do some reading on lobelia- haven't a clue on how to use it.Daughter is doing fine now with no meds and gentle chiropractic adjustments to thoracic area. Now if I could just get her
asthma suffering daddy to see the chiro...
Happy Mothering!


LJ
Member posted 04-01-2001 10:56 AM
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There is a treatment called, NAET (Nambudripad's Allergy Elimination Technique) that COMPLETELY ELIMINATES all kinds of allergies (food/environmental/chemical etc. etc.)
It applies pressure on specific points and is completely non-invasive and easy to use for kids.

A lot of people use it with great results for allergies, asthma, autism, ADD/ADHD and we used it to stop our sons seizures.

You can check out the website, www.naet.com

It has changed our lives!



copslass
Member posted 04-01-2001 05:19 PM
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Thanks for the website, LJ!
I added to favs, will read it soon. In our house, I'm the one who suffers. On so many meds now, chiro wasn't enough for me, that I'm worried about whether I could have a safe pg.
Thanks again!
Tracy


Holistic Momma
Member posted 04-07-2001 03:33 PM
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Some wonderful suggestions! Even so, I thought I'd chime in. I have just learned that asthma occurs at a much higher percentage in vaccinated children than UNvaccinated children. I have heard of homeopathy being successful with clearing some of the vaccine toxins from the body. This in turn might alleviate his asthma. It can't hurt and would sure be worth a try. I would see a classic homeopath.


another
Member posted 04-18-2001 09:23 AM
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Try working with yoga breathing. It increases breath control and can be very calming. For child can recommend the Yoga Kids video to introduce the whole concept of yoga. Some people can even head off mild attacks by going into yoga breathing.
There was also an article in Parade magazine of all places sometimes this month about a celebrity athsmatic who used a yoga based technique to "fix" his athsma. It had address to get a video, etc. on how to do this.

I have had people with me in Yoga class who were doing specifically for their athsma and thought it was wonderful. They felt more in control and needed less or no meds after regular practice.

This is very non-invasive and has many health benefits aide from maybe helping the athsma. Won't hurt and cost is really minimal.

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