What do you think of routine mammograms? - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 33 Old 03-31-2006, 04:23 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I'm 45 and scheduled for a mammogram next week. What do you think about mammograms? I've had one other quite a few years ago,but I'm starting to question *routine* exams if there isn't reason for concern. Am I crazy?
A side note: I'm doing this for my mom,who was diagnosed with breast cancer 3 years ago at the age of 60. The cancer was stage 1. She had radiation and that was it. Do you think that is a reason to get a mammogram?
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#2 of 33 Old 03-31-2006, 05:03 PM
 
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There was a thread awhile ago about mammograms. It may have been in the vaccines board.

I remember the main consensus was let the men go first : As in let the men go and have their package squished and then if men still think its a good idea we women will go and have mammograms.
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#3 of 33 Old 03-31-2006, 05:14 PM - Thread Starter
 
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#4 of 33 Old 03-31-2006, 05:18 PM
 
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I think given your family history, that yes you especially should have routine mammograms done.
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#5 of 33 Old 03-31-2006, 05:25 PM
 
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I'm all for it, that is, for *me*. Then again, my mom had stage III with a radical mastectomy at age 39, pre-menopause...so my risk is a bit higher than the general population.

My mom found hers on her own just to dumb luck. She hadn't had a mammogram yet, she was only 39. She read a Reader's Digest article about self breast exams, and decided to do one that night - and she found the lump. I shudder to think what would have happened if she didn't read that article, since it was only the size of a pea from the outside and was already stage III.

I've already had a baseline, and will continue regular screening. And personally, I don't see what all the hub bub's about - it's never been a painful procedure for me (then again, I've been told by several health practitioners that I have a high pain tolerance).

For women who don't have an increased risk though, I don't think it's necessarily a good idea - but then again, my mom wasn't in any high risk group either, but if she'd had a screening, maybe it would have been caught earlier and her breast could have been spared....who knows...

All I know is what's right for me.

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#6 of 33 Old 03-31-2006, 05:29 PM
 
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I remember hearing a discussion about this on NPR, and a lot of medical professionals believed that routine exams are just another money maker for the doctors.

I wish I could remember the details from the segment; it was a long time ago. But they mentioned that the number of actual cancer cases that are found from a routine breast exam is very very small. Some doctors feel that women are being scared into paying for medical tests that have very little importance in terms of long-term health.

There was also some discussion about how the anxiety that some women experience about their breast health may actually be causing other medical problems.

Sorry I can't remember the details. I remember thinking "WTF?" when I first heard them talking about the idea that RBE's were unnecessary, but I ended up understanding and agreeing with a lot of what was said.

If you think about it, we aren't all asked to go for regular skin-scans to check for melanomas or potentially malignant moles. We don't all feel we need to get yearly electrocardiograms to check our heart function. Yet getting RBE's is something that women just assume is what has to be done.

I'm not sure where I personally stand on the issue. But it's defenitely interesting.
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#7 of 33 Old 03-31-2006, 05:30 PM
 
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I think they are very important. Of course the test isn't perfect, but until something better comes along, women over 40 should be getting them. The new ACS stats are that 1/7 USAmerican women will get breast cancer in her life. My grandma died of breast cancer. When they found out she had cancer, she had a grapefruit sized lump. That could have easily been detected and treated if it had been detected earlier by a yearly mamogram. I know way too many people who have survived BC b/c of early detection to not think mamograms are a good thing.
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#8 of 33 Old 03-31-2006, 05:35 PM
 
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My own concerns are that X-rays have been PROVEN to cause cancer, yet they're using X-rays to possibly detect cancer? What if routine mammograms actually cause breast cancer?

I can certainly see the value in doing a mammogram after actually finding a lump. I can see the value in doing a "baseline" mammogram at age 40 or 45, so you have something to compare in case another mammogram is done later if a lump is detected.

I'm not telling any other woman what to do, but I'm not comfortable with personally having "routine" mammograms done. I do a self-exam at least once a month- I'm not sure what value a mammogram will have over that.

Ruth, single mommy to Leah, 19, Hannah, 18 (commuting to college), and Jack, 13(homeschooled)
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#9 of 33 Old 03-31-2006, 05:37 PM
 
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I forgot to add, that I do think there is a profit motive involved, like everything in Biomedicine, but for me, that doesn't outweigh the potential benefit of early detection. Also, I get upset with all of the "think pink" stuff where a brand promotes itself for giving a (usually small) donation to Komen.

I think more money should be spent on finding out the causes of cancer, not just the treatment. "Breast cancer awareness" was started by a pharma company that makes BC drugs as well as pesticides and other chemicals known to cause cancer. This is sick. I think that federal regulation and consumer attention needs to go into prohibiting carcinagens like smoke, pesticides, plastics, pollution and emissions.

I still think mamograms are important, but that we should shift the approach to breast cancer to make it research for the cure *and* the cause.
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#10 of 33 Old 03-31-2006, 05:41 PM
 
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Let's look at me as a case in point. I was diagnosed with breast cancer last year at the age of 45. The tumor was about 4 cm in diameter. That's pretty honking big. I had not had a mammogram for several years prior because some stuff changed with my primary care practice, and I never got around to finding another one. I spent the better part of last year getting chemo, surgery and radiation.

I am kicking myself for not getting routine mammos from 40+. My cancer would absolutely have been caught earlier. I am lucky that it had not spread to my nodes, but the size of the tumor at diagnosis is inversely related to survival rates.

Every time I look at my small children, I realize what a complete idiot I was for not going for my routine mammogram every single year. I just hope nobody is as stupid as I was.
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#11 of 33 Old 03-31-2006, 05:59 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I'm listening mamas.
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#12 of 33 Old 03-31-2006, 06:11 PM
 
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Quote:
However, Dr. John Gofman, who has been studying the effects of radiation on human health for 45 years, is prepared to tell us exactly what diagnostic X-rays are doing to our health.

...

Quote:
With five scientifically documented books totaling over 2800 pages, Dr. Gofman provides strong evidence that medical technology, specifically X-rays, CT scans, mammography, and fluoroscopy, are a contributing factor to 75% of new cancers.
Quote:
However, Dr. John Gofman, who has been studying the effects of radiation on human health for 45 years, is prepared to tell us exactly what diagnostic X-rays are doing to our health....With five scientifically documented books totaling over 2800 pages, Dr. Gofman provides strong evidence that medical technology, specifically X-rays, CT scans, mammography, and fluoroscopy, are a contributing factor to 75% of new cancers.
Its bolding for some reason, I have not bolded it.

Quote:
In his book, "Preventing Breast Cancer," Dr. Gofman says that breast cancer is the leading cause of death among American women between the ages of forty-four and fifty-five. Because breast tissue is highly radiation-sensitive, mammograms can cause cancer. The danger can be heightened by a woman’s genetic makeup, preexisting benign breast disease, artificial menopause, obesity, and hormonal imbalance.91


http://www.doctoryourself.com/deathmed.html
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#13 of 33 Old 03-31-2006, 07:00 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Ok,my mom was taking hormone replacement therapy for a number of years before her diagnosis. I personally believe this was a major factor in her stage 1 cancer,if not *the* reason. There is no breast cancer in our family in either the maternal or paternal. My maternal grandmother lived to be 99 and died of old age. My paternal grandmother died of heart issues at 85.
I guess I am just cynical of the medical establishment period. We know it's about the almighty DOLLAR. I don't trust them.
I DO do self breast exams every month after my period. I'm healthy. I eat very well.
My mom says I'm too dang radical and a non-conformist. And I read too much.
Jeez,I don't know what to do.
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#14 of 33 Old 03-31-2006, 07:02 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EFmom
Let's look at me as a case in point. I was diagnosed with breast cancer last year at the age of 45. The tumor was about 4 cm in diameter. That's pretty honking big. I had not had a mammogram for several years prior because some stuff changed with my primary care practice, and I never got around to finding another one. I spent the better part of last year getting chemo, surgery and radiation.

I am kicking myself for not getting routine mammos from 40+. My cancer would absolutely have been caught earlier. I am lucky that it had not spread to my nodes, but the size of the tumor at diagnosis is inversely related to survival rates.

Every time I look at my small children, I realize what a complete idiot I was for not going for my routine mammogram every single year. I just hope nobody is as stupid as I was.
I'm sorry to hear that you were diagnosed with breast cancer, and I'm glad that you're doing OK now. I'm sure it must have been a very traumatic year for your whole family. I just have one question for you: were you doing monthly self-exams of your breasts? I would think that a 4 cm tumor would be fairly easy to FEEL.

Ruth, single mommy to Leah, 19, Hannah, 18 (commuting to college), and Jack, 13(homeschooled)
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#15 of 33 Old 03-31-2006, 09:26 PM
 
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I just have one question for you: were you doing monthly self-exams of your breasts? I would think that a 4 cm tumor would be fairly easy to FEEL.
Yes I was, and yeah, I agree. But I'm large-breasted and am naturally pretty cystic, and the tumor was located such that I just didn't feel it.

I think I let myself believe that the BSE was enough and that's why I didn't rush to get my routine mammograms. Mammograms aren't perfect, but they are way better than no mammograms.

BTW, most people who are diagnosed with breast cancer do not have a family history of it.
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#16 of 33 Old 03-31-2006, 09:38 PM - Thread Starter
 
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EFmom,thank you for taking the time to share with me. I hope and pray you never have to face cancer again!
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#17 of 33 Old 03-31-2006, 10:02 PM
 
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There was a great thread about this subject in the Vaccine Forum.

I will post the link later on when I am at my own computer.

Personally I will not get a mammogram or pap smear or anything else.

But I have no history of cancer in my family.

BTW, I am 60 yrs. old
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#18 of 33 Old 03-31-2006, 11:49 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruthla
I'm sorry to hear that you were diagnosed with breast cancer, and I'm glad that you're doing OK now. I'm sure it must have been a very traumatic year for your whole family. I just have one question for you: were you doing monthly self-exams of your breasts? I would think that a 4 cm tumor would be fairly easy to FEEL.
boy, does that depend on the person, type of tissue, size of breast, placement of tumor, etc...
self exams are an excellent diagnostic tool, though - "know thyself"
just don't want to blame the victim, though...
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#19 of 33 Old 03-31-2006, 11:56 PM
 
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Originally Posted by oldermamato5
I'm 45 and scheduled for a mammogram next week. What do you think about mammograms? I've had one other quite a few years ago,but I'm starting to question *routine* exams if there isn't reason for concern. Am I crazy?
A side note: I'm doing this for my mom,who was diagnosed with breast cancer 3 years ago at the age of 60. The cancer was stage 1. She had radiation and that was it. Do you think that is a reason to get a mammogram?
to answer:
I think mammo's have the potential to save a life by providing an earlier diagnosis.

No, you aren't crazy to ask this question.

Yes, I think this is a reason to get one. You have a first degree relative with breast cancer. What "routine" you get them on will ultimately be up to you. It will depend on the result of your mammo, the biopsy-specific type of ca your mom had, the type of breast tissue you have, your access to funds and insurance, your comfort level with self detection, etc, etc...
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#20 of 33 Old 04-01-2006, 12:45 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Gitti,have you *ever* had a mammo? Tell me why you wouldn't get either a pap or a mammo now. Or maybe you never have had either one. I'm really interested to hear your story.

once again mama's,I appreciate all of this input.
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#21 of 33 Old 04-01-2006, 02:13 AM
 
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Originally Posted by oldermamato5
Gitti,have you *ever* had a mammo? Tell me why you wouldn't get either a pap or a mammo now.
Yes, I used to get them both done up until eight years ago. Then I started to question both procedures.

First off, I have a mother (and deceased grandmother) who never believed in either. As a matter of fact, both believe(ed) in very little doctoring. And neither ever had a pap or mammo.

Secondly, I read that women in Europe are encouraged to have mammograms done only every 2 years and after a certain age every 5 years. And they have a lot less cancer. What does that say? That mammograms cause cancer? I don't know. But I also read that the doctors in the US have very poor training in reading mammos and therefore send more women for follow ups or for biopsies.

I have read of women who've had lumps in their breasts, the OB suggested a biopsi, the ND suggested eliminating antiperspirant. The ND's suggestion worked. Why would I choose to follow an OB's advice?

Third, we have this whole thing about doctors being afraid of getting sued and so they would rather take out too much too soon than take a chance. Everyone accepts 'it was necessary'. But why do women in the US need such radical surgeries and surgeries per se much more often?


When I stopped getting mommos, I decided to stop paps as well. I had a questionable pap smear more than once. Every time it was very nerve wrecking. And yet, every time when I had it redone in a few months, it came back normal. It would have only taken one anxious doc to go ahead and do a more invasive procedure. How would I have known that in three months the test would have come back 'normal'.

At age 52 they put me on the hormone replacement patch. I had that patch stuck to me for 5 years thinking I was doing something good for my body. It was supposed to prevent osteoporosis, heart conditions, strokes, premature aging, beside hot flashes, etc. etc.

They did the women's study and it turned out the whole replacement patch was basically a fraud from the pharma. They halted the study early because the chances for strokes, heart attacks, osteoporosis etc. was INCREASED by so much. How did that make me feel? Like I had been used.

Well, I don't feel like being used any longer. I decided to do what my mother, grandmother, and certainly all the women before them in my family had done: rely on health.

Mammograms and pap smear are both invasive and unnatural. To each his own. But NO THANK YOU! for me.
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#22 of 33 Old 04-01-2006, 11:31 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Thank You Gitti,for your wisdom and insight.
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#23 of 33 Old 04-01-2006, 09:59 PM - Thread Starter
 
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#24 of 33 Old 04-02-2006, 03:32 AM
 
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If you think about it, we aren't all asked to go for regular skin-scans to check for melanomas or potentially malignant moles. We don't all feel we need to get yearly electrocardiograms to check our heart function. Yet getting RBE's is something that women just assume is what has to be done.
If you go for an annual physical, then yes you are probably being checked for suspicious moles and such, at least at some of them. When the doctor listens to your lungs, she can also hear what your heart is doing--and order the EKG if something seems suspicious.

OTOH, I can see getting a mammogram every other year as reasonable if there's no family history and you've had clear ones previously.

OTOOH, my own doc figures if your insurance covers it... she's seen far too many cases of breastcancer in women in their 40s, who thus would NOT have had many if any mammagrams to be a cause, to take this lightly.

I had a baseline one done 2-3 years ago, when DD was still nursing a fair amount. I found it only mildly uncomfortable.

Quote:
In his book, "Preventing Breast Cancer," Dr. Gofman says that breast cancer is the leading cause of death among American women between the ages of forty-four and fifty-five.
I'd like to see another source for this statistic. Leading causes of death for women as I've heard are heart disease and lung cancer, as well as accidents.




We need to go check some statistics from another source. Last I had heard, lung cancer is the most common cancer, including among women. Last I'd heard

"What will you do once you know?"
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#25 of 33 Old 04-02-2006, 03:50 AM
 
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Learn something new everyday.

At 45 or thereabouts, cancers become the leading cause over heart issues.

But then I found this "Breast cancer is the most common cancer among US women (other than skin cancer), striking more than 200,000 each year and killing more than 40,000." at a CDC website.

That "other than skin cancer" seems significant to me... I guess it's an age breakdown issue...

"What will you do once you know?"
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#26 of 33 Old 04-02-2006, 11:53 AM
 
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I never thought I had to worry about breast cancer..

As some of you already know I was diagnosed at 27yrs old w/ stage 2 invasive ductal carcinoma. Upon excision my tumor had grown to 3.1cm, which is extrememly large. It was a high grade tumor and non-hormonal.

My mother had stage 1 breast cancer at 51yrs old. My sister is 30 and currently has two "suspicious" tumor's in her lymph nodes.

For "me" I feel mammo's are really do or die. I feel my life is more important than the worry of a mammo causing cancer.

**to reitorate my tumor grew in 6 MONTHS, To go further per ultrasound viewing my tumor grew 1/2cm in 10 days!!! I was breastfeeding at the time too. For the grace of god it did not spread into my lymph nodes, with this high grade if it did, I would be at a much worse diagnosis.
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#27 of 33 Old 04-02-2006, 12:43 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Meiri



We need to go check some statistics from another source. Last I had heard, lung cancer is the most common cancer, including among women. Last I'd heard
Your right lung cancer is number one and breast is number two.
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#28 of 33 Old 04-02-2006, 07:01 PM
 
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Wow-lots of great insight and positions on both sides of the spectrum here....As "oldermamato5"'s very own daughter the thought of you not getting one and having a lump go unnoticed and then the possibility of you getting sick I can say that I wish you would just go ahead and get one....HOWEVER I know you are healthy eat well and very diligent in self exams.What is one to weigh this all against? I can see its a very tough choice......it IS life IMO versus bucking the system almost.....Is there proven research about mammos being cancer CAUSING versus being the vehicle for discovery? I guess on this one mama I am biased as I would ALWAYS ALWAYS want you to find things like this in the very earliest stage possible? You arent taking any hormone replacements or anything so maybe it couldnt hurt......I mean to get a mammo.......I always stand ebhind your decisions 150% and I would never question what is right for you.....and sometimes Mamaw is a bit dramatic (not to downplay anyone elses cancer) I mean in regards to your being a little "unconventional" . I wish there was a proven way to find cancer early enough (consistently) with having your boobs squished but in the end maybe it IS the lesser of two evils.

All this being said with me having NO knowledge of mammos at all.........
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#29 of 33 Old 04-02-2006, 07:21 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thank You de-lovely,and I love you too.
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#30 of 33 Old 04-02-2006, 07:32 PM - Thread Starter
 
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check this article out if your interested and tell me what you think.
www.preventcancer.com/patients/mammography
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