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#121 of 1016 Old 01-11-2007, 10:07 PM
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I'm hypo. I felt awful on Synthroid and I feel much better on Levoxyl.

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#122 of 1016 Old 01-12-2007, 03:59 AM
 
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#123 of 1016 Old 01-13-2007, 01:14 AM
 
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Could my thyroid really be making my ass drag the ground??

I find myself nodding off at work at my desk. It is really weird how it hit about me 2 weeks ago.

Single Mom to 2 amazing little men. T(7) and B(5)
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#124 of 1016 Old 01-13-2007, 06:03 AM
 
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I only seem to have Thyroid problems when I'm knocked up. My first time around with dd I would always black out and was alway sick, and could not do anything! And no one ever tested my levels. With DS I was dealing with the same thing, but this time I was trembling uncontrollably, and after having to call out of work todays in a row on the weekend cause I could hardly keep my self together I talked myself into going to the er. My blood pressure and pulse was through the roof. (I was going into a thyroid storm and was lucky to get to the hospital that day.) They took me back and put me on an IV and said I was dehidrated (from throwing everything I ate or drank up). They ran some test and it came back I was hyperthyroid. I was put on PTU for my pg and afterwards I stopped taking it cause I did not want it in my bm. Then 6 months after having ds I had my levels checked again and the were fine. I guess I'm lucky on that part but I'm wanting to try for another, but I'm afraid of dealing with the thyroid thing again but I guess this time would not be going into it with out being prepared.
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#125 of 1016 Old 01-14-2007, 10:42 PM
 
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Ok so i have hyper Th. so and i am nursing my son. Gosh i am so worried to take meds and bfeedingf. Does any one know if its safe ?(any meds)
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#126 of 1016 Old 01-16-2007, 03:32 AM
 
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#127 of 1016 Old 01-16-2007, 09:17 AM
 
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Nithin Baby said she's HYPER, though, not HYPO. That's a whole different set of meds. I really don't know anything about them, but you might like to browse www.thyroid.about.com . they have a lot of info there.

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#128 of 1016 Old 01-16-2007, 12:32 PM
 
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Thanks Mamas, i am very scared about this for my son while he is not eating any sloids at all and so i am very conserned. I will check out the web site.thx
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#129 of 1016 Old 01-21-2007, 01:38 PM
 
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Everyone says Thyroid Meds are safe - where are the long term studies? Same for antidepresants while pregnant. Where are the long term studies that follow the health of children exposed in utero once they reach adulthood? Does anyone know of a resource for this?
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#130 of 1016 Old 01-21-2007, 03:59 PM
 
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Nithin, I don't have any personal experience myself, but while researching hypothyroidism, I ran across a site that discusses both, written by a guy who became hyperthyroid and decided to find a way to treat it himself. The basic idea is mineral/vitamin supplements. The site is ithyroid.com and it has a lot of hyper- info. The stuff I read on his site seemed sound for hypo- but again, I don't know diddly-squat about hyper, but I wanted to post the link because there's so much more info in this thread and in general about hypo. Good luck!
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#131 of 1016 Old 01-21-2007, 07:09 PM
 
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Hi, I just found this thread. I was diagnosed w/ graves in 02 and treated with radio active iodine in the summer of 05. Now I'm hypo, and taking synthriod. It's nice to see I'm not alone in all this
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#132 of 1016 Old 01-21-2007, 09:59 PM
 
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Originally Posted by mommyshine View Post
Everyone says Thyroid Meds are safe - where are the long term studies? Same for antidepresants while pregnant. Where are the long term studies that follow the health of children exposed in utero once they reach adulthood? Does anyone know of a resource for this?
I don't know about studies indicating the safety of thyroid meds during pregnancy specifically. There is A LOT of research about the risks of untreated hypo while preg (increased risk of m/c even into the 2nd trimester, neurological defects, mental retardation, etc). Without adequate maternal thyroid hormone, the baby's brain cannot develop normally.
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#133 of 1016 Old 01-21-2007, 10:15 PM
 
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Originally Posted by staceyshoe View Post
I don't know about studies indicating the safety of thyroid meds during pregnancy specifically. There is A LOT of research about the risks of untreated hypo while preg (increased risk of m/c even into the 2nd trimester, neurological defects, mental retardation, etc). Without adequate maternal thyroid hormone, the baby's brain cannot develop normally.
Very true, I was hypo when I concieved ds#3 in Jan. of 06 and I had to see the endo every 4 weeks throughout the pregnancy to make sure my levels didn't drop to low. He had to increase my dose almost every month, now 4 months pp we are lowering it again...maybe someday my meds will stay the same for more then 2 months, then poor dh can have a break from these mood swings
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#134 of 1016 Old 01-21-2007, 11:17 PM
 
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Thank you for all the wonderful information. I am currently waiting on results from an u/s for an enlarged thyroid.
I am upset regarding the SOY info from the stopthetyroidmadness site. I admit, I am a soy junkie....
Of course, my dr only ran the TSH (=2.1) and I feel like it was a useless test.
Keep posting!
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#135 of 1016 Old 01-22-2007, 04:34 PM
 
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I have hashimoto's thyroiditis. Have been going round and round trying to get proper treatment for several years. Finally found a WONDERFUL holistic md who is willing to use Armor and treat my symptoms not my test results. So far no miracles have occured but its only week 2. Have read it can take weeks, even months for proper treatment to make you feel better.
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#136 of 1016 Old 02-01-2007, 12:01 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Nithin Baby View Post
Ok so i have hyper Th. so and i am nursing my son. Gosh i am so worried to take meds and bfeedingf. Does any one know if its safe ?(any meds)
Same for me and I'm stressed to the limit about it. My TSH (i think that's what it is) came back <0.1. That freaked me out. I am exhausted but my baby (9 months) nurses all night long so I figured that was the cause. My hair has fallen out quite a bit, but I don't have too many other symptoms.

I'm so worried about medicating it because it seems like the meds for hyper may not be safe for bf'ing...and I just can't stop bf'ing my son...we're both addicted. Seriously, he would be traumatized if I had to stop and I nursed my first for 2 1/2 years and expected to do the same or more for this one.

Is anyone treating hyperT and bf'ing??

I'm one freaked out mama right now....
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#137 of 1016 Old 02-01-2007, 01:22 AM
 
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I got some blood work done:

TSH: 1.22
Glucose: 95 (2.5 hours after a mini reese cup but otherwise no food)

They did a testosterone level check:

Testosterone, Female/Children 22
SHBG: under 24 (I have no idea what this is)
Free Testosterone: 4.3

HELP!!!

Single Mom to 2 amazing little men. T(7) and B(5)
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#138 of 1016 Old 02-01-2007, 01:27 AM
 
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hyperthyroid and breastfeeding
Quote:
High thyroid levels (hyperthyroid)

Moms who are hyperthyroid have elevated thyroid hormone (usually T4) levels. Symptoms include weight loss (despite an increased appetite), nervousness, heart palpitations, insomnia, and a rapid pulse at rest.

Hyperthyroidism is not a contraindication for breastfeeding. Per Medications and Mothers' Milk (Hale 2002, p. 417-418, 423-424), only exceedingly low levels of thyroid hormones (both T4 and T3) transfer into breastmilk.

In animal studies, high thyroid levels interfered with milk let-down (Lawrence & Lawrence 1999, p. 522).
http://www.kellymom.com/health/thyro...ml#safetyhyper


Hyperthyroid meds:

Quote:
Anti-thyroid medications

* carbimazole (Neo-Mercazole)
* methimazole (Tapazole)
* propylthiouracil (PTU)

Info on selected anti-thyroid meds
Name of medication

AAP approved?*

Lactation Risk Category**
Notes
carbimazole (Neo-Mercazole) yes L3 (moderately safe) (1)
methimazole (Tapazole) yes L3 (moderately safe) (2)
propylthiouracil (PTU) yes L2 (safer) (3)
* Per the AAP Policy Statement The Transfer of Drugs and Other Chemicals Into Human Milk, revised September 2001.
** Per Medications' and Mothers' Milk by Thomas Hale, PhD (2002 edition).

(1) "Carbimazole is a prodrug of methimazole and is rapidly and completely converted to the active methimazole in the plasma." (Hale 2002, p. 112-113)

(2) Hale describes several studies that looked at infant thyroid function (185 mother-infant pairs in all) - all the infants had normal thyroid function after maternal treatment, even when the mother was taking higher doses. One large study (139 mother-infant pairs) observed mothers & babies for over 12 months. "The authors conclude conclusively that both PTU and methimazole can safely be administered during lactation. However, during the first few months of therapy, monitoring of infant thyroid functioning is recommended." Hale notes that "propylthiouracil may be a preferred choice in breastfeeding women." (Hale 2002, p. 465-466)

(3) "Only small amounts are secreted into breastmilk. Reports thus far suggest that levels absorbed by infant are too low to produce side effects... No changes in infant thyroid have been reported... PTU is the best of antithyroid medications for use in lactating mothers. Monitor infant thyroid function (T4, TSH) carefully during therapy." (Hale 2002, p. 603-604)
From http://www.kellymom.com/health/thyro...treatment.html

If Dr Hale says its OK then it really is OK.
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#139 of 1016 Old 02-01-2007, 01:49 AM
 
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Thank you, Zane. You saved me tonight. I've been fitful about these test results and just knowing that bf'ing isn't going to have to be terminated is a HUGE relief.

Thank you thank you thank you!!!!!
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#140 of 1016 Old 02-01-2007, 02:00 AM
 
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Barb - Go to the kellymom site. There is lots more info about hyper and bf. About the only thing that will STOP bf is the radioactive thryoid tests. Then you must stop for something like 50 days while the meds clear your system.

In general a good rule of thumb - if Dr tells you to wean, get a second opinion AND research the advice from both of them on the web. It is almost never neccessary and Drs are the worst source of accurate bf info.

From LLL site
Quote:
I may have an overactive thyroid; can I still breastfeed my baby?

An overactive thyroid gland, also referred to as hyperthyroidism or Graves’ disease, is an important health concern. Thyroid disease is serious as the thyroid controls the body's metabolic processes. According to the LLLI BREASTFEEDING ANSWER BOOK (BAB), any breastfeeding mother with thyroid disease should be under the care of a doctor who is supportive of her desire to breastfeed.

Diagnosis of an overactive thyroid can usually be based on the mother's symptoms as well as a simple blood test. On occasion, radioactive testing is used to diagnose thyroid problems. If radioactive testing is recommended, the mother can ask her physician if the test could be postponed or another, non-radioactive test, be substituted.

If the radioactive test is used, temporary weaning is recommended. "The length of time the mother needs to suspend breastfeeding will depend on the type and dosage of radioactive materials used for the test" (BAB). Radioactivity of breastmilk declines over time, and frequent milk expression will help the mother eliminate the radioactivity from her body more quickly. This milk must be discarded and not fed to the baby. (Frequent milk expression will not hasten the elimination of other drugs from breastmilk.) For pumping information see LLLI FAQs about pumping.

Contact a La Leche League Leader for the most up-do-date information about the time period needed to sufficiently clear radioactivity from breastmilk.

Some medications for overactive thyroid are not concentrated in human milk and result in minimal doses to the breastfed baby If a mother is taking thyroid suppressants, she will need to tell her baby's doctor so the baby can be monitored for thyroid levels. Weaning is usually not necessary. If a doctor insists on weaning, the mother is encouraged to seek a second opinion before weaning. When temporary weaning is recommended, it is important to be sure the risks and benefits have been fully evaluated. If you have questions about the medications you are taking, contact a La Leche League Leader.

If radioactive compounds are used to treat an overactive thyroid, temporary weaning is necessary. The mother will need to pump and discard the milk during this time. Before a mother resumes breastfeeding, her milk must be checked for radioactivity. Your local LLL Leader will be able to share more information and offer support.
And if the really scientific makes you happy
Quote:
Breastfeeding in mothers with treated Graves’ disease

The question of the safety of lactation during ATD therapy arises frequently 267. Historically, women receiving ATD have been advised against breastfeeding because of the fear that ATD, concentrated in milk, might affect the infant’s thyroid function. Both PTU and MMI are secreted in human milk, although PTU less so because of its more extensive binding to albumin 281-284. In one study evaluating the effects of CMI (15 mg/d) or PTU (150 mg/d) on infants of nursing mothers, there was no evidence of neonatal hypothyroidism in the first weeks of life 285. In another study, serum MMI levels were measured in breastfed infants of thyrotoxic mothers receiving MMI (20-30 mg/d): two hours after MMI ingestion, serum MMI levels in the babies were extremely low, far below the therapeutic range 286. Thus, both with PTU and MMI, only limited quantities of these drugs are concentrated into milk. As long as the doses of MMI or PTU can be kept moderate (MMI <20 mg/d; PTU <250-300 mg/d), the risk for the infant is practically negligible and there is no evidence-based argument to advise mothers against nursing when they take ATD 248,267,287. It is prudent to monitor periodically the infant's thyroid function during the time of ATD administration to the mother, although a recent reassuring study showed that thyroid function in breastfed infants was not affected, even when ATD induced maternal hypothyroidism 288. There is also a possibility that allergic reactions associated with ATD (agranulocytosis or rash) may occur in the infant. While these side effects are rare, they should be kept in mind when evaluating a febrile infant or presence of rash. In summary, within the limitations outlined above, the use of ATD in lactating mothers does not pose a risk to the neonate and appears to be safe.
http://www.thyroidmanager.org/Chapter14/14-frame.htm
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#141 of 1016 Old 02-02-2007, 01:16 PM
 
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Nithin Baby...did you get any further tests done? I had blood drawn to check T3 and T4 (I think those are the correct names) and we'll see what happens.

I've been reading and reading online and it seems as though postpartum hyperthyroid is not terribly uncommon. Often it seems to go untreated and then periodically checked to see if it resolves on its own...I suppose this is only if the symptoms are mild. I have very few symptoms and can't discern the fatigue from hyperthyroid or just being a mom of 2 and nursing all night long. I'm going to see an acupuncturist and see if that will help balance things out.

Thanks again, Zane. I took Paxil for PPD after my first was born and I struggled desperately with issues of safety and bf'ing...even though everyone told me it was safe. I had to go on it because I was a wreck and everything turned out fine....my now 4-year old shows no ill effects. I really had no choice in the matter and it wasn't advised to discontinue bf'ing.

Anyway, I'm finding myself in that same struggle of not wanting to take anything if I can avoid it...but I also don't want my current condition to impact him but it seems like that's not something to worry about.

OK, I'm just talking/writing through my thoughts because it helps. Thanks for listning/reading!!
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#142 of 1016 Old 02-02-2007, 01:22 PM
 
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For anyone with mood issues, anger, depression, dark cloud feeling... I highly recommend reading Julia Ross' book "The Mood Cure". It is about using natural amino acid therapy to boost seratonin in the brain like nature intended, instead of artificially forcing what little you have to recycle with SSRIs.

She has a section on how thyroid function effects mood but I haven't read it yet, I'm sure it's excellent based on the rest of her info.
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#143 of 1016 Old 02-02-2007, 02:58 PM
 
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Thanks for the book title. I look forward to reading it.
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#144 of 1016 Old 02-02-2007, 03:28 PM
 
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Originally Posted by staceyshoe View Post
I don't know about studies indicating the safety of thyroid meds during pregnancy specifically. There is A LOT of research about the risks of untreated hypo while preg (increased risk of m/c even into the 2nd trimester, neurological defects, mental retardation, etc). Without adequate maternal thyroid hormone, the baby's brain cannot develop normally.

I know about this - I requested testing monthly when pregnant with #2. My concern for this results from a personal experience. I took a low dose antidepressant for a while in my early 30's and had bizarre things happen in my brain when starting and stopping them and it just concerns me that children's brains could be exposed to this. My OB said no one has done any long term studies yet and I think people should know this. They probably ARE safe but I don't think anyone knows for sure yet. Before all the studies of suicide and antidepressants I was told by a Dr if I wanted to get well I had to take my medicine - after I told him had violent dreams. I did not go back to that Dr after he said that. Use your intuition and don't be affraid to question your doctors. Learn things - which we are all doing by being a part of this site.

Everyone must weight the risks on both sides - a sleepy and or depressed mother isn't good for a baby either. I think it is very important to try nutrition and exercise before resorting to medicines. If I had listened to my first and second doctor I'd be on Synthroid right now, for the rest of my life. Instead I spend a little more money on supplements (they cost more than an Rx) and have discovered ways to eliminate pollutants in my diet and environment. I am feeling wonderful, naturally, and I am still nursing... What worked for me may not work for everyone. I don't condemn anyone for taking medications. I offer myself as some one who, fortunately, did not have to take them - who went against the advice of two conventional doctors, who made me fear for my life if I didn't take my medicine. Also anyone who does take medicines, and has been told they have to for the rest of their life, may not. It is important to know this. When things were really bad I considered taking Armour temporarily.
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#145 of 1016 Old 02-02-2007, 03:43 PM
 
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Hey mommyshine, I've been meaning to write again. I really appreciated you sharing your way of dealing with your hypo. I am still doing this on my own with the vitamins/minerals, but I am feeling a lot better--it's been a major turnaround, and the improvement was quicker than I expected. Sharing your experience helped me when I was feeling really tired out and wondering if this would actually work. My endo gave me a prescription for Synthroid, but I don't think I'm going to have to fill it.
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#146 of 1016 Old 02-02-2007, 08:45 PM
 
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That is so great that you've been able to manage it naturally...that's what I would desperately like to do. I really don't feel that bad, however since getting the lab results back I'm feeling worse...a bit hypochondriacal, me thinks!

Wonderful, Tanya, that you're feeling better! I'm glad you're sticking with the supplements and nutritional changes...good for you!

I have an appt with an acupuncturist next week. Who knows, my second tests may come back normal in which case I think the TSH might have been wrong? I dunno...I'm trying to be patient and just wait and see but when it comes to concerns about bf'ing and the health of the baby, I tend to ruminate and worry like crazy. Doesn't help matters much.

I also think my estrogen levels are really low. Right after the baby, I had some other issues and when I went to see the midwife, she did an exam and said it was clear that I had very little estrogen in my system. She gave me an estrogen cream that sort of worked but really just time seemed to make matters better. I'm wondering if my TSH test might have also be affected by low estrogen levels or other hormones? I'm clearly very susceptible to postpartum hormonal swings since after baby #1 I had such a severe case of PPD...it was actually postpartum anxiety and it was so extreme that medications were a must. I had no time to investigate other things as I could barely hang on each minute. It was truly awful. But the meds worked terrifically for me and I think I was very lucky to have had such a positive response. I agree with the pp that not everyone responds that way at all. It's a terribly complicated thing. Fortunately, quite a lot of studies have been done on mamas taking Zoloft and Paxil and both transfer very little amounts to the breastmilk. The thyroid suppressing drugs, however, I know nothing about. It seems that LLL says some are safe, but I'm skeptical. And I don't want to mess with something that might just resolve on it's own or with a little help from an acupuncturist.

Oh dear, I'm rambling again. I'm quite fixated on all of this right now. I just want to enjoy my babies...this kind of threw me for a loop.

Thanks again for the time and patience....
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#147 of 1016 Old 02-03-2007, 01:05 AM
 
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stumbled on this thread, and it seemed like y'all might be the right people to ask about dh.

when he was 20, he had a pre-employment physical with a dr. who palpated his thyroid, said it was enlarged, took a needle biopsy and told dh to take pills to shut his thyroid down. he took them for a few weeks, then threw them out and ignored this issue for the next 25 years with no known ill effect (seems healthy), but he doesn't see dr's.

now he just had a bad bike accident, had head/spine CT's, and we were reading the results and they mention his left thyroid is calcified. any idea what that should mean for him?

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#148 of 1016 Old 02-03-2007, 02:13 AM
 
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stumbled on this thread, and it seemed like y'all might be the right people to ask about dh.

when he was 20, he had a pre-employment physical with a dr. who palpated his thyroid, said it was enlarged, took a needle biopsy and told dh to take pills to shut his thyroid down. he took them for a few weeks, then threw them out and ignored this issue for the next 25 years with no known ill effect (seems healthy), but he doesn't see dr's.

now he just had a bad bike accident, had head/spine CT's, and we were reading the results and they mention his left thyroid is calcified. any idea what that should mean for him?
I don't have any experience w/ this but the way I understand it is that a thyroid nodule (a growth on the gland) can calcify. I'm not to sure what you mean by his left thyroid as there is only one, is it to the left of his thyroid or on the left side of it? Sorry I'm not much help... I hope your dh recovers from the accident quickly.
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#149 of 1016 Old 02-03-2007, 04:55 PM
 
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Originally Posted by faerierose View Post
I don't have any experience w/ this but the way I understand it is that a thyroid nodule (a growth on the gland) can calcify. I'm not to sure what you mean by his left thyroid as there is only one, is it to the left of his thyroid or on the left side of it? Sorry I'm not much help... I hope your dh recovers from the accident quickly.
thanks for the response! i'll quote the CT report: "calcification is noted within the left thyroid gland." my recollection of anatomy doesn't go too far about thyroid structure, and i'm too lazy to get out my grant's atlas, probably just the way radiologists refer to the thyroid to be concise? since it's symmetrical? anyway, a nodule might be what that MD felt/biopsied 25 years ago, so if it's calcified is that something of concern? and was a nodule something to have gone on pills for? we'll see an ENT on monday, maybe we can ask then. dh will do as little medically for himself as he can get away with; he has great distrust of the medical profession (partly fueled by experiences like the thyroid incident). but he did let himself get strapped to a board until his neck was cleared, and let himself be stitched. and he is recovering, but he's pretty achey and tired now that the adrenaline has worn off. thanks for the

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#150 of 1016 Old 02-03-2007, 08:26 PM
 
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Originally Posted by formerluddite View Post
thanks for the response! i'll quote the CT report: "calcification is noted within the left thyroid gland." my recollection of anatomy doesn't go too far about thyroid structure, and i'm too lazy to get out my grant's atlas, probably just the way radiologists refer to the thyroid to be concise? since it's symmetrical? anyway, a nodule might be what that MD felt/biopsied 25 years ago, so if it's calcified is that something of concern? and was a nodule something to have gone on pills for? we'll see an ENT on monday, maybe we can ask then. dh will do as little medically for himself as he can get away with; he has great distrust of the medical profession (partly fueled by experiences like the thyroid incident). but he did let himself get strapped to a board until his neck was cleared, and let himself be stitched. and he is recovering, but he's pretty achey and tired now that the adrenaline has worn off. thanks for the
The thyroid is shaped like a butterfly I don't think there is a medication to treat nodules, I think a nodule can cause hyperthyroidism, in that case thyriod suppressent drugs might be used. I'm not too familiar with these types of thyriod problems but I would have it looked into if it were me, I do know some nodules can become cancer (I really hope that's not the case), and if it effects his thyriod levels it could cause many other types of health problems. Abnormal thyriod levels can cause mild annoying symptoms or be potentially life threateng.
I'm glad he is all stitched up and on his way to recovery Sorry for any typo's, my 4 month old ds is on my lap squirming like crazy
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