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#1 of 42 Old 12-21-2006, 09:40 PM - Thread Starter
 
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My daughter was diagnosed at an early age with asthma and it seems that the calmest of colds ends up in either croup or pneumonia. So we always end up with an rx for albuterol and the nebulizer. I am very anti-steriods and meds as I dont see how it helps her in the long run. My dh on the other hand is terrified she'll die of suffication when she gets sick. Though she isnt even gasping for air. I dont want her to suffer and i also dont want dh to feel like he's crazy. Is there an alternative? I cannot remember what my midwives told us last year to use, Acconite maybe? Any tips would be helpful. Also if anyone has any studies or research on the bad effects from Albuterol i'd love a link so i can print it for dh, since research always seems to settle his mind on these types of issues. THANKS!

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#2 of 42 Old 12-22-2006, 02:53 AM
 
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Albuterol is not a steroid. So if steroids are what you fear, albuterol is not a problem.

If she's really got asthma, well, there's a reason that modern medicine has worked on developing all the various modern medications for it. That being that the herbal and whatnot don't really work. BTDT, am breathing quite well now that I'm being effectively treated. How they help her in the long run is that by being properly oxygenated, her brain and the rest of her body are properly oxygenated and can thus function properly. If she's having to burn energy in just making an effort to breathe, there's less energy for things like play, thinking, growth.

As for other meds, there is Ventolin, a slightly different molecule from Albuterol. I had been on that, made me shaky. There is MaxAir (pirbuterol acetate) though I'm not sure what age it's approved for. That's the emergency broncho-dilator that I use. The molecule has been refined to where it has much less effect on the heart, which means little to no rapid heartrate when it's used and no jitteriness. There are also oral broncho-dilator meds, but anything oral is going to be a higher dosage in order to be effective. The beauty of inhaled meds is that less is needed as the medication is being sent directly to where it needs to be to be effective.

I'm not up on how asthma in children is treated since we've been lucky so far on that front. DD may be starting to develop issues though.

I think you need to have a long discussion with her doctor so that you understand what he/she is seeing, why he/she is prescribing that med versus another, what the med does, what the alternatives might be, what can be done (many things) to perhaps limit the need for the meds. If you're not understanding, then that doctor is not doing a good job explaining. If you're not understanding the whys and wherefors, then you're not going to have the info you need to help make these decisions for your child's health.

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#3 of 42 Old 12-22-2006, 05:01 AM
 
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How it helps her in the long run? Well, if she is having an asthma attack, then the smooth muscle of her bronchials are tightening. This is called a bronchospasm. This is essentially an airway restriction. Airflow is limited and gas exchange is impaired. What does this mean? The vital oxygen that she needs is not going in and the carbon dioxide that she does not need is staying in her lungs. This can be fatal! The heart will beat faster in attempt to provide oxygen to her body, the peripheral tissues become oxygen depleted, the toxicity of the carbon dioxide is damaging and lastly the airway can completely close. Albuterol is a broncho- dilator. It eases the smooth muscles, assisting and calming the airway. It assists in opening up and thus allowing proper oxygenation.
There are several things that you can do to assist in immune boosting and to help prevent colds and viruses. But I would not balk the albuterol, use it when it is serious.. its needed, you can do more harm by not using it.
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#4 of 42 Old 12-22-2006, 06:04 AM
 
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As a previous poster said, albuterol isn't a steroid. For most asthmatics, albuterol is their "rescue" medicine. It is used to open up (dilate) the airways for quick relief during an episode. And, it is used to get those airways open so that other longer-acting, preventative medicines can get in. Those preventative meds are the steroids that you are concerned about. They are used to prevent the inflammatory response that causes the airways to constrict.

As for what the albuterol does for your child... well, it helps her breathe. If a virus/infection has triggered the asthma, it also helps open up her airways so she can cough up that gunk that is further constricting them. Long-term, you are right... albuterol is doing nothing for her. It is not a preventative. Short-term, it is doing a lot.

I do have to address this:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aka mommy View Post
Though she isnt even gasping for air.
You don't have to be gasping for air to be having an asthma attack. I don't gasp for air when my asthma is acting up. Let me see if I can think of an exercise to explain it. Sit quietly in a chair. Take a deep breath, filling up your lungs about 2/3 full. Leave your lungs that full and now breath shallowly... don't gasp, don't release all of your breath. Just use what lung capacity you have left to breathe. Do that for a minute or two. You can do it, you can even survive on it. You don't need to gasp. But, do you feel like getting up and doing a jig while breathing like that? Probably not.

That was one of the first things I noticed after I starting treating my asthma... I just had more energy. More energy equals more fun, of course. But, it also equals more energy for your child's body to fight off that infection that triggered the asthma in the first place.

That is not to say that there are not more natural asthma treatments. There are natural ways to help prevent the asthma attack in the first place, and that may be what you want to focus on so that you can avoid the steroids you are worried about. But, as an asthmatic, I wouldn't recommend witholding a bronchodilator (the albuterol) if needed. Breathing easily makes everything else in life much easier, whether you are a kid or adult.

Me , 36 year old RN and future AP mom in training . I am wife to one wonderful husband and "mom" to one great rescue pup :.
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#5 of 42 Old 12-22-2006, 06:31 AM
 
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double post!
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#6 of 42 Old 12-22-2006, 06:34 AM
 
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You might want to switch to Xopenex...it's a milder form of albuterol. Most doctors treat little kids with this...albuterol is kind of strong.

If she does have asthma you really need to do BOTH the Xopenex and the pulmicort (inhaled steroid) to treat her effectively. The xopenex is only for treating acute attacks, while the pulmicort reduces inflammation and prevents the attacks.

My 3yo has asthma as well, and he takes Singulair. It's a non steroid medication for reducing inflammation and it works really well. We also do nasal irrigation. We usually do short courses of these as needed, maybe for a month or so. Since we've started he hasn't needed a nebulizer at all. New research is showing that reduction of allergens, and nasal irrigation can cut back on the number of attacks greatly, sometimes completely. This is going to be the new trend in treating asthma. I would highly recommend the book What Your Doctors Don't Tell You About Allergies and Asthma It's an easy read and gives alot of great information about treating asthma...without pushing the drugs. In fact, many docotrs highly overmedicate, when a few simple steps can really cut back on the severity.

I would also recommend you start seeing an allergist vs. a pediatrician and get her adenoids and tonsils checked. Alot of times this is the silent cause of asthma.
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#7 of 42 Old 12-22-2006, 08:18 AM
 
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my little child was on ventolin since a very young age. A year before, i have been quite unsure of the step to follow due to the fact that I know from experience that all chemicals are very bad for the health of people specially in the long run. I have just started with an alternative like biovent which is a natural product. I am still trying it and i am going to see if it works well.
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#8 of 42 Old 12-22-2006, 12:29 PM
 
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Can we not make an artificial, arbitrary, and entirely false dichotomy between "chemicals" and "natural" please? Water, for example, is a chemical formed by the atomic bonding of the two elements hydrogen and oxygen. Anyone going to suggest that it's not natural?

Thank-you Opihi for the specifics in regards to children. And Gaelach and Lilacmoon, great descriptions!

For non-medical ways to help prevent attacks, one needs to be familiar with what's triggering them. If it's only illnesses like colds and such, then immune boosting as well as frequent handwashing (to help prevent transmission) are part of what's needed. Taking measures to cut out irritants from the air: dust, pet dander, smoke, etc will help too. Good air circulation, with effective filtration, is a great help. HEPA filters seem to be standard on vacuums, but it may still be best to keep the asthmatic in another room while vacuuming.

The American Lung Association used to run a really good program for asthmatic children called Camp Breathe Easy. Might be worth looking into for your family to get better understanding of this condition and how a child can indeed have a normal active life with it.

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#9 of 42 Old 12-22-2006, 01:30 PM
 
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My little one has asthma.
We use albuterol when things act up. She just turned 1 year old and we may be starting the pulmicort soon. It is for 12months to 10 years i think.

I agree that your best "natural" defense is hand washing, washing bed linens weekly in hot hot water, and keeping away from sick people. You can also do supplements, like Vit. C and echinacea....etc.
You dont have to be gasping for air during an attack, not too mention they can quickly accelerate and become a serious problem and may cause death.
THere was a women here locally that refused to treat her child's asthma and the child died and she was given a LIFE sentence!
Obviously that is rare, but it shows the severity of the disease. Ashtma kills hundreds/thousands of people each year and is the nubmer one reasons for missed school in children.
Ashtma actually makes it harder for you to get the air "out of your lungs" THe air gets trapped and builds up harmful carbon monoxide in your lungs. No one would want to stay in a house full of carbon monoxide, so why not treat the child? I would not want my child to suffer.
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#10 of 42 Old 12-22-2006, 01:48 PM
 
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There is some really really great advice on this thread.! Hooray!

I would second the advice of reducing allergens in the house.... even if they seem to not be related. My boys both have pretty severe virus induced asthma. We really got a handle on the household allergens and food sensitivities. Now they are sick much less often and we are able to manage the asthma well. Last winter though we were perscribed the steroid meds and told we needed to be on them ALL year long. At the end of the cold season last year we weaned them off and really focused on everything we could do around the house and to boost thier systems. We didnt go back on the meds this winter yet and have ony pulled out the emergency neb meds twice! We were on 4 times daily ventolin type meds and 2 times daily pulmocort... both kids. We were barely away from the darn machine. And we were still in the hospital frequently. Reducing possible allergens REALLY really worked for us!

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#11 of 42 Old 12-22-2006, 02:08 PM
 
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is this the book???

What Your Doctor May Not tell You About Children's Allergies and Asthma: Simple Steps to Help Stop Attacks and Improve Your Child's Health (Paperback) by Paul Ehrlich, Larry Chiaramonte



Quote:
Originally Posted by 3_opihi View Post
You might want to switch to Xopenex...it's a milder form of albuterol. Most doctors treat little kids with this...albuterol is kind of strong.

If she does have asthma you really need to do BOTH the Xopenex and the pulmicort (inhaled steroid) to treat her effectively. The xopenex is only for treating acute attacks, while the pulmicort reduces inflammation and prevents the attacks.

My 3yo has asthma as well, and he takes Singulair. It's a non steroid medication for reducing inflammation and it works really well. We also do nasal irrigation. We usually do short courses of these as needed, maybe for a month or so. Since we've started he hasn't needed a nebulizer at all. New research is showing that reduction of allergens, and nasal irrigation can cut back on the number of attacks greatly, sometimes completely. This is going to be the new trend in treating asthma. I would highly recommend the book What Your Doctors Don't Tell You About Allergies and Asthma It's an easy read and gives alot of great information about treating asthma...without pushing the drugs. In fact, many docotrs highly overmedicate, when a few simple steps can really cut back on the severity.

I would also recommend you start seeing an allergist vs. a pediatrician and get her adenoids and tonsils checked. Alot of times this is the silent cause of asthma.
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#12 of 42 Old 12-22-2006, 02:25 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LdyBluNH@aol View Post
is this the book???

What Your Doctor May Not tell You About Children's Allergies and Asthma: Simple Steps to Help Stop Attacks and Improve Your Child's Health (Paperback) by Paul Ehrlich, Larry Chiaramonte
Yep, that' s the book. Sorry! It's a great read for anyone who's child has asthma or allergies.
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/boo...46679886&itm=1
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#13 of 42 Old 12-22-2006, 03:12 PM
 
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My ds was diagnosed with asthma at 4 months...and we spent at least a year on a daily steroid inhaler. I had a terrible doctor who really condescended to me when I asked questions about side effects and such. He refused to discuss and basically said the alternative was living in the hospital. Anyway, over time as ds got older things got a bit better and I took him off the steroid. We used the ventolin when necessary and we found Respiractin which is a liquid and I find it in health food stores or the health section of a few grocery stores (we're in Canada). There is a children's version but I'm not sure what age you can start at or how old your child is. Now, at the first sign of a cold (his trigger) I start him on respiractin and we haven't used the inhaler for a while now he's 4 now).
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#14 of 42 Old 12-22-2006, 04:34 PM
 
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As an aside, it's not carbon MONoxide (CO) that builds up in our lungs when we're not effectively exhaling, it's carbon DIoxide (CO2). We need some CO2 to trigger our normal breathing reflex, but not too much.

That said, CO does indeed kill, but it's not the problem during an asthma attack.

This is a common misunderstanding.

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#15 of 42 Old 12-22-2006, 10:11 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Quite frankly I am appalled at this thread!

I did not post my 25 years of experience personally with asthma because I did not feel the need to justify that I understand the seriousness of asthma. Nor did i feel the need to explain my complete understanding of how the bronchioles and every part of the body is affected by an asthma attack. With that being said, I also know that simply gasping for air does not equal an asthma attack. No where did i slam mothers who choose to use medicinal routes to treat their children, nor did i slam methods of treatment. I simply stated "I am very anti-steriods and meds as I dont see how it helps her in the long run". An immediate relief of wheezing is not a long term affect or result. It is immediate. It is incredibly simple to see the immediate effects of these drugs.

Now having gotten that off my chest. I asked for alternative methods to treat. I also asked for studies on the meds i mentioned. Skimming through the responses I am at a loss. I did not ask for why i should continue to pump up my child full of a man made chemical that could possibly give her a heart attack or blindness. I especially feel strongly about this since she is ONLY 3 years old. She is not a grown adult, having inhaled years of bad pollution and other such factors for asthma. I have heard of many alternative methods and homeopathic remedies helpful with croup and asthma. Im interested in finding those.

For those who actually answered the questions i asked, thank you. We definately have worked stringently on keeping the viral infections and sickness out of our house. Of course this is much harder with both girls in daycare, but we try try try to keep hands clean, immunities built up and a constant stock of immunity boosters in store! I also think finding out common food allergies might help her. Im contemplating cutting milk out for the rest of the winter to see if that boosts her immune system.

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#16 of 42 Old 12-22-2006, 11:29 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Sorry for the snippy tone. I read this after a crappy day at work and both kids home sick with my sisters. So much for my holiday spirit :

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#17 of 42 Old 12-22-2006, 11:31 PM
 
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I'm sorry you were apalled, but I don't see anyone trying to attack you on this thread. In fact, all the posts seemed very polite and most attempted to help. You haven't gotten alot of specific suggestions for natural products, but almost every post suggested to you that they most natural ways to control asthma are to prevent the triggers. Obviously, your second post makes it clear that you already knew that, but we can't read your mind or know your knowlege base of asthma when you post. People respond based on the words in your post.

Based on your first post, they (and I) responded to your question about albuterol. Your post implied that you thought albuterol was a steroid, and I think posters wanted to make sure you knew that albuterol is not a steroid in order to ease your mind. Yes, albuterol can have side effects but those side effects are less scary than a steroid's side effects, so it seemed important that that issue be straightened out. Perhaps you already knew that albuterol was not a steroid. But, again, we can only respond to the words in your post.

Some posters who have chosen to treat their asthmatic children with medicines gave you their experiences. Was that what you were offended by? They weren't pushing drugs on you, any more than you are pushing a natural route on them. They simply told you what their experiences were and what had worked for them. Nothing appalling. They weren't "slamming you". They didn't call you a bad mom for wanting a natural remedy. They posted their experiences, nothing more.

I think you might have been offended by those of us that suggested you not withold a bronchodilator if it is needed. No one was attacking you.... no one posted that you were bad for wanting to not give your child albuterol. We simply posted concern for your child because we know how asthma feels. If I could find a natural bronchodilator with no side effects, of course I would use it. But, I do feel that the occasional use of albuterol is better than suffering through constricted airways. Again, my opinion. Not meant to be offensive.

As for other, more natural remedies, there is some research that suggests that increased intake of dietary magnesium can help to prevent asthma attacks. Google magnesium and asthma and you'll get some good sources. Hopefully, some other posters with natural product suggestions will see your post soon.

Me , 36 year old RN and future AP mom in training . I am wife to one wonderful husband and "mom" to one great rescue pup :.
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#18 of 42 Old 12-22-2006, 11:34 PM
 
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Oops.. AkaMommy, we cross-posted. I'm sorry that your kids are sick. What a way to spend the holiday! Hope you guys are feeling better very soon.

Me , 36 year old RN and future AP mom in training . I am wife to one wonderful husband and "mom" to one great rescue pup :.
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#19 of 42 Old 12-23-2006, 03:12 AM
 
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I was about to type up a post about albuterol not being a steroid and how helpful the albuterol inhaler has been to me when I have my occasional asthma attacks but I won't now that I've read your second and third posts. I'm careful about washing the laundry, vacuuming often with other Dyson, keeping out allergens, and washing my hands as though I have a compulsive disorder. All those things have helped me with my asthma. This is the first time in nearly 2 years I've needed my inhaler. I've had asthma for about 18 years and I haven't come across a "natural inhaler". If there is one I'd like to hear about it too.

FWIW, I don't think anyone was attacking you though it may have seemed that way. I also read your first post the same way as many others did - you seemed to be saying albuterol = steroids. On a message board, we have to go by the written word. We can't read the expressions on your face, the tone of your voice, your nods/shakes of the head, etc. So going purely by what you put in your original post and what was not said, the responses aren't that surprising. Anyway, don't want to beat a dead horse here and I don't meant to be snippy. I wish you and your little one the best.

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#20 of 42 Old 12-23-2006, 04:10 AM
 
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If you do a google search for natural asthma, alot of things come up.
Respitrol was one, someone else mentioned it helped them alot. Looks like kids can take it too.
There are many others.
If you find one that works or looks good, let us know. I would be interested myself.
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#21 of 42 Old 12-23-2006, 01:46 PM
 
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I was dx'd w/asthma around 10 years old, which is now 20+ years ago, when it wasn't as common. Some of the things we tried before meds were: diet modification- no dairy, sugar, many other things I don't recall; chiropractic adjustments; sometimes, black coffee or flat coke help relax the lungs during an attack- the caffiene does it- more natural than meds, but doesn't always work; steam baths; dry air; allergy shots- b/c my asthma was allergy driven; removing carpet, using special cases on pillows/beds; and I'm sure there were more I'm not recalling now.

We tried this for about a year before we started using maintence meds- theophylline at the time- which is now known to be a carcinogen and addictive. I had to slowly wean off it or I'd be really sick. My mom tried all the natural things we could think of/knew at the time and for me, I ended up on meds. I'm still on meds- albuterol and advair.

If you find something that works naturally, that's wonderful. For me, unfortunately, that just didn't work.

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#22 of 42 Old 12-24-2006, 12:10 AM
 
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Well. Thank-you Gealach for expressing my feelings on this.

Not being mindreaders, we can only go by what is typed into a post.

Epinephrine is quite natural, works too, as long as you don't mind having a heartrate as if you're perpetually watching a horror movie or some such.

That's the thing with asthma and natural remedies. ALL of the early treatments were natural: epinephrine-inhaled or by emergency injection, oral ephedrine (Primatene tablets), herbal Ephedra (which is now illegal due to its side effects). And ALL of them have way nastier side effects than the more recently developed inhalers, which are also derived from natural molecules btw. I've lived through the comparison, starting out by treating myself with good old Primatene, trying herbs, etc.

Where do you think the molecules in the meds originate? Frankly, I'll take a more manipulated med that treats the attack without making me feel like my heart's going to exit my chest or making me feel like an Aspen tree in a windstorm over a less humanly manipulated one that does both.

The most natural way to help control asthma is to control the triggers. After that, I've never seen anything that beats modern meds in terms of LIMITED side effects as compared to effectivenes. Nothing.

As far as I can tell, from reading and experience, caffiene only helps in an attack if you're not a regular consumer of it. It's natural too, but hardly reliable.

I hadn't heard that about Theophylline though. ugh. At what dosage levels, or what length of time, does it become a carcinogen? Because I do question the studies that give rats 1000x the normal human dosage and then call it a carcinogen when, surprise! the poor buggers develop cancer. Now if the studies are finding it to be an issue at near usage levels, there's most definately a problem.

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#23 of 42 Old 12-24-2006, 01:10 AM
 
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Sorry, mom, I didn't mean to offend you. I've suffered from asthma my whole life, and the biggest "natural" things that you can to do control asthma are:

control the triggers
nasal irrigation.

You can try herbs and such, but the previous suggestions are going to be the two biggest things you can do to control her asthma. By the time she gets to an attack stage, you're too far gone, in my mind for natural remedies (and I'm a wholistic health practitioner so I'm pretty natural . Medicines are there for a reason, and not being able to breathe seems like one of the better reasons to use them. Sorry if that thought makes you mad.

I don't blame you for not wanting her on a neb and steroids. There are other, safer maintenance alternatives (but still meds) that she can take before she gets to that point.

I took prednisone for my asthma for years and I think that's what caused my arthritis, so I can definitely sympathize with you.
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#24 of 42 Old 12-24-2006, 03:09 PM
 
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Quote:
I took prednisone for my asthma for years and I think that's what caused my arthritis, so I can definitely sympathize with you.
Oh yeah, Prednisone sucks. I had to be on that only once for a short course to knock my lungs back into functioning mode after I'd gotten over a virus. I'd take just about anything to avoid having to take that.

That experience though confirmed for me the value of the inhaled meds of whatever type. The dosage needed to effectively treat is so much less when being send right there where it's needed then when it's got to go through the digestive tract and bloodstream first. Lower dose = fewer and less serious side effects.

FWIW, the information I got from Hale, back when he answered questions from us mere moms, confirmed that concept too.

"What will you do once you know?"
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#25 of 42 Old 12-24-2006, 05:12 PM
 
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I'm not sure about the theophylline- I was told that by my doc when I moved and they changed my meds to advair- said theo. was an older med they don't like to use any more. I told my mom about it (I was 21/22 at the time) and she acted like she knew all along. I hadn't thought to question b/c I was 10 when I originally started the theo. I never researched it, either, just going by what I was told. I shoudl have stated that in my post b/c of course, we're not always told correct info.

Michelle -mom to Katlyn 4/00 , Jake 3/02, and Seth 5/04
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#26 of 42 Old 12-24-2006, 06:10 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Aka mommy View Post
Im contemplating cutting milk out for the rest of the winter to see if that boosts her immune system.
This has been a huge help for my 4yo DS. He's not technically allergic, but when he was eating dairy (started around 2 1/2, though I always consumed it so he got it in my milk from birth), he was one of those faucet-nosed kids. He would sneeze and my big kids would all holler, "C. exploded!" And of course, the snottier he was, the more his asthma flared. That said, we've had a lousy couple of months, with two major flares, symptoms almost every single day, and one bronchitis, but before October, he hadn't had any asthma symptoms in 5-6 months!

I wish I knew more about how to treat asthma more naturally. We've made all the changes to our house that we can, what with cutting down on dust, elminating molds, etc. Fortunately, DS is a great little eater so I try to optimize his immunity with good foods. Other than that, I don't know. I hate depending on all these drugs, too. I keep all of DS's meds in a bowl in the kitchen cabinet and it depresses me to see all of it, as many drugs as my elderly grandma takes! He gets Flovent and Zyrtec daily, albuterol as needed via neb or inhaler (several times a day, lately), and of course the dreaded prednisone to knock back a flare. He's working his way through a course of antibiotics right now, too. Yuck! Beats the heck out of being unable to breathe, but I know it's not good for him. My midwife is an herbalist who also has asthma herself and I think my next step should be to call her to see what more we can do. It would be a dream if we could reduce these meds. In addition to the risks of the medicine, he's already a wild man and steroids leave him climbing the walls, he's so hyper. If you find anything interesting in your searching, will you PM the links to me?

Good luck.

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#27 of 42 Old 12-25-2006, 01:03 AM
 
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Uptown - have you had him see an allergist? There really is no reason for him to be taking something as strong as prednisone unless he has the worst, most severe form of asthma...unless you were actually referring to pulmicort, which is the inhaled steroid and isn't nearly as strong as oral prednisone and isn't systemic. Anway, I would really urge you to get a second opinion on that.

My 7yo has pre lupus symptoms and he's only been on oral pred a few times and only then when it's a quality of life vs. risk scenario. And then it's only for short courses, like 3 days or something. It just has such horrible side effects. It breaks my heart to see little kids on it.

Anyway, if it's his nose that's causing it, you might want to see an allergist about getting him on something like Singulair, which is specifically for nasal inflammation...so much safer than the other stuff and actually helps with the root cause vs. just treating the symptoms.
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#28 of 42 Old 12-25-2006, 01:56 AM
 
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I am sorry you are having a hard time lately AKA Mommy. This time of year, with it's closed up rooms, stress and close contact with a lot of other people can lead to illness and asthma (or asthma like) flare ups I am sure you knew that though!

My DD was also diagnosed at a very young age with severe asthma and allergies. She is 5 now. DS, now 8, has recently been diagnosed with a "signifigant" allergy to dust, birch, molds and mildew (but no asthma! yay!). Since I was already taking steps for DD's allergies & asthma, I just had to add a few extra things to my weekly cleaning schedule... and make sure to keep DS from jumping in any more piles of leaves :

Cutting out milk is always a good idea, since it promotes mucous production.
We noticed a very big difference in just switching from "regular" milk to organic when ever we can afford it. I am not sure why, but the organic milk seems to be easier for everyone here to handle. Plus it tastes so much better!

To us, it was a HUGE help taking the kids to both a pediatric allergist and a pulmonary specialist. Our allergist provided us with a ton of written information on natural allergy and asthma trigger controls... all mentioned in previous posts. To know exactly what it is I need to do to help my kids is invaluable.

Uptown... We got a prescription for Albuterol for DD the last time I needed refills. For some reason the insurance would not cover Xopenex. Anyhow, she used it once and unless it is the only thing left in the house and she is in distress I will not give it to her again, she had such a bad reaction to it. I called the dr, they called the insurance, and we got her regular Xopenex prescption back. It agrees with her SO much better, and from what I can tell works better too. She takes this plus pulmicort via nebulizer PRN. She also takes singular and flonaise (although I admit to forgetting the flonaise sometimes... she gets it about every other day), both of which have signifigantly reduced her need for the nebulizer.

Can you talk to your Dr? Is it there a chance that a different med might work just as well but have less of an impact on your child's behavior? Can you switch to just a bronchodilator for daily use with the steriod for bad flare ups? Could the Zyrtec be irritating him? DS tried that and it made him sooo grouchy, tired and hyper all at once.

Good luck to all of you, and I am looking forward to seeing what other input others have

The Tabbie Family; DH , DS , DD , a few :, a couple : and me.
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#29 of 42 Old 12-25-2006, 01:58 AM
 
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BTW, we were able to reduce the dosage for pulmicort by 1/2 with no noticable difference

The Tabbie Family; DH , DS , DD , a few :, a couple : and me.
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#30 of 42 Old 12-25-2006, 01:59 AM
 
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Yes, we had a hard time with the Zrytec as well. It actually is the only antihistamine that crosses the blood brain barrier and caused my son to be CRAZY. He takes Clarinex now and is much better.
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