Speech impediment in a toddler? - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 14 Old 03-21-2008, 07:24 PM - Thread Starter
 
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My ds is about 32 months and seems to be developing something of a stammer. It is most noticeable when he is excited or keyed up. Does anyone have experience with this?

Thanks
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#2 of 14 Old 03-21-2008, 09:09 PM
 
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My speech impediment was a lateral lisp, not the cute Cindy Brady one. I went to a speech pathologist when I was in about 3rd grade and it did wonders for me, I no longer have the lisp. Plus it was something I always wanted to do because I can pick out the slightest impediment in anyone. Never did it though, but there is still time

My parents also worked with me at home, I think that is key.

Does DS realise he stutters? Does he get frustrated with it? The first step is for the child to know they have a speech impediment. I had no idea I did for the longest time because people would imitate me thinking it was funny which only made it worse.

When he gets excited or keyed up try to get him to take a deep breath and think about what he wants to say first. Then it might be a little easier for him to put his thoughts into words. When he gets a little older you could tell him to hear himself in is head saying the words, then it's more deliberate.

He could always grow out of it too

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#3 of 14 Old 03-21-2008, 11:05 PM
 
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Whether you should be concerned depends on whether it is actual stuttering; I'm not sure what you describe is since you mention it's when he is excited and describe it as a stammer.
Take a look at this article:
http://www.drgreene.com/21_817.html

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#4 of 14 Old 03-22-2008, 01:50 PM
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Just so you know, the politically correct term for it is "blocking," not "stammering" or "stuttering."

We found a very good speech therapist for my son who was able to help him overcome this.

I completely disagree with the PP--DON'T tell him to "take a deep breath" or "think about what he is saying." That will make him more self-conscious about it.

DO slow down your own speech. If you talk fast, he may be trying to keep up with your pace.

Also get down on eye level with him, and perhaps touch him, so he knows that he really has your attention.

If it continues beyond a few weeks, I would take him to a speech therapist if I were you.

"Our task is not to see the future, but to enable it."
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#5 of 14 Old 03-22-2008, 01:50 PM
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double-post

"Our task is not to see the future, but to enable it."
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#6 of 14 Old 03-22-2008, 08:06 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks for this info. I am going to pursue the issue with ds' doctor. He suffered a grade 4 IVH at birth so we are slightly on the lookout for potential after affects.

I used the term stammer as I understand this to mean repetition of words rather than struggling with certain letter sounds. With ds it is more the words or phonemes than a letter. I liked the term 'disfluency' in the article, that seems to sum it up well. I'm glad to know that we aren't too early to be picking up on this or dealing with it.

Just to respond to earlier question ds seems to have no awareness of this but is exhibiting quite a lot of whineyness and tantrum throwing at the mo. Maybe linked or maybe because he is 2.5!

Any other info anyone has would be greatly appreciated.
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#7 of 14 Old 03-22-2008, 09:14 PM
 
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If you are vaccinating, I would avoid all further vaccines at least until this is resolved. Some vaccines can cause neurological problems.
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#8 of 14 Old 03-22-2008, 10:42 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A&A View Post
Just so you know, the politically correct term for it is "blocking," not "stammering" or "stuttering."

We found a very good speech therapist for my son who was able to help him overcome this.

I completely disagree with the PP--DON'T tell him to "take a deep breath" or "think about what he is saying." That will make him more self-conscious about it.

DO slow down your own speech. If you talk fast, he may be trying to keep up with your pace.

Also get down on eye level with him, and perhaps touch him, so he knows that he really has your attention.

If it continues beyond a few weeks, I would take him to a speech therapist if I were you.
Yes, I agree with this poster. Drawing attention to the stuttering is likely to make it worse.
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#9 of 14 Old 03-23-2008, 01:10 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Ds isn't getting any more vaccines regardless At the moment I am trying to help him find his way past the block by giving him my focus and letting him know he is heard. If he seems overexcited I am trying to be reassuring, like "It's ok, just take your time." He really doesn't seem aware of it at all, it is just like he gets stuck like the needle on a record and can't move forward til he jolts himself out of the rut. Otherwise he is doing really well, he is confident and chatty, very verbal. I just worry that if this pattern isn't addressed it will become ingrained and more difficult to get past it.
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#10 of 14 Old 03-23-2008, 02:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hedgewitch View Post
If he seems overexcited I am trying to be reassuring, like "It's ok, just take your time."
I wouldn't say that. Again, it's drawing attention to it and actually makes it harder for him to talk. Just GIVE him the time, make eye contact, wait, etc. but don't say this to him.

"Our task is not to see the future, but to enable it."
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#11 of 14 Old 03-23-2008, 03:15 PM
 
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hi hedgewitch-
coming over here from my post in toddler section- thanks for your reply.
i'm having a hard time determining whether my son is exhibiting the "normal disfluency" as the article calls it or a "true stutter." he'll say things like "b-b-b-b-because" or "b-b-b-but" or why-why-why." so which is this? anyone?
he doesn't seem to notice it at all- he's only 29 months. hedgewitch- have you talked to your pediatrician?
thanks for any advice!
jen

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jack 10.13.05 gabriel kai 6.9.09
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#12 of 14 Old 03-25-2008, 03:59 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I haven't seen my doctor yet but am trying to get an appt to discuss ds' speech patterns. I don't feel it is a major problem but would rather address it now.

Will let you know how I get on.
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#13 of 14 Old 03-25-2008, 08:56 PM
 
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my opinion is its way too early to tell. stammering and stuttering and even blocks are normal for that age, even till 5.

my sons father is an adult who stutters. when our son was 2, 3 and for most of 4, he definitely stammered, had blocks, and weird pauses in his speech, especially when excited. Since my ex husband stutters, we were alert about it, and did some research, and decided that it was not the time to determine it yet. my son also had a really pronounced lisp. I was concerned, but also read that many of these speech things disappear at about age 5.

now, at age 6 , both those things are gone, and his speech is "normal".

i am very glad i didnt try to get him in speech therapy or anything " to take care of it when he was young" because it would have been a waste of time and money. he was even still lisping as recently as when he started kindergarten this fall (07) and it slowly disappeared.

we did follow the advice to not rush them, to wait patiently until they said what they needed, and to speak slowly yourself to help them slow down.
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#14 of 14 Old 03-25-2008, 09:00 PM
 
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just wanted to add that my son did all the kinds of things you guys mention. just dont worry! if they are "real" stutterers, its going to be something you can treat when they are 5 or 6, and for now, just wait and see...
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