Atypical Tetanus In A Completely Vaccinated 14 year-old-boy. - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 9 Old 05-26-2011, 04:50 PM - Thread Starter
 
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#2 of 9 Old 05-26-2011, 05:16 PM
 
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I found it also interesting that he had no history of deep puncture wounds, really dirty wounds or any other "typical" tetanus worry wounds. It mentioned a scrape on his knee that he got from some wooden floorboards a week prior that was in the process of healing (that he did not clean at the time)

If nothing, this article reminds me that all wounds, big or small, no matter the source, should always be cleaned.

 

Great to note that despite the large delay (and rapid progression of symptoms) in receiving the appropriate dose of TIG, he was fully recovered in 6 months - 1 year.

 

Thanks for posting.

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#3 of 9 Old 05-27-2011, 10:26 AM
 
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According to my research on tetanus, it would extremely unlikely to get tetanus from a small scrape.  Tetanus requires some pretty specific conditions in which to manifest (typically spores get into a deep wound where the conditions are favorable for them to become active & turn into tetanus over a period of time, it's not like you touch something & instantly get tetanus like with Staph).  Typically children regardless of their vax status have good immune systems & good circulation and their bodies will get rid of these spores before they have a chance to become active tetanus (tetanus is much more common in the elderly due to weaker immune systems & poor circulation).  

 

Yes, all wounds should be cleaned & covered, but I am left wondering if the scrape really caused the tetanus.  Regardless, the fact that he was fully vaccinated & STILL got tetanus is food for thought.


"Unthinking respect for authority is the greatest enemy of truth."- Albert Einstein

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#4 of 9 Old 05-28-2011, 04:25 AM
 
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Yes, deep puncture wound is commonly the most favourable, but according to the CDC stats here http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/ss5203a1.htm Things like abrasions and splinters (which they consider a puncture wound) do account for known tetanus cases.

 

Quote:

Type of Injury, Wound Treatment, and Prophylaxis

 

Among 129 patients with information provided on the condition leading to tetanus, acute trauma was reported for 73% (94/129) of patients; no acute injury (i.e., patients with abscesses, ulcers, or gangrene) was reported for 26% (34/129); and one case (1%, 1/129) was reported in a neonate (Table 2). A puncture wound was the most frequent type of acute trauma (50%), followed by lacerations (33%) and abrasions (9%). Puncture wounds included stepping on a nail (15 cases), splinter (five cases), injury from barbed wire (five cases), a tattoo (one case), and a spider bite (one case).* The acute injury was located on the lower extremity in 48 (51%) patients, the upper extremity in 34 (36%) patients, the head or trunk in nine (10%) patients, and not specified in three patients. The environment in which the acute injury occurred was reported for 83 (88%) patients. Thirty-seven (45%) patients were injured at home or indoors; 26 (31%) were injured while farming or gardening; 19 (23%) were injured while engaging in other outdoor activities; and one (1%) was injured in an automobile accident.

Ninety (96%) of the 94 patients with an acute injury had information reported regarding medical care for the injury. Of these 90 patients, 33 (37%) sought care for the acute injury. Tetanus toxoid prophylaxis for wound management was administered to 20 patients (19 of whom were eligible according to ACIP recommendations [21]); no tetanus toxoid was administered to 12 patients (11 of whom were eligible); and information was not available for one patient. Therefore, 63% (19/30) of eligible patients who sought care received tetanus toxoid prophylaxis.

 

 

I agree also that most cases (and fatal cases) are in those over the age of 60 and especially diabetics.

 

Still this a very rare thing to have happen, but it does remind me not to become complacent about proper wound care.

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#5 of 9 Old 05-28-2011, 08:35 AM
 
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 Springmum, in the article you posted the spider bite case has an * after it. Can you tell me what that indicates? DS has what I think is a spider bite that doesn't seem to be healing and I've been a bit concerned about it the last couple of days.

The last time I read the CDC's Pink Book, it didn't mention insect bites as a "tetanus prone injury." I read such conflicting things about tetanus and insect bites.

 

Not trying to hijack the thread btw. orngtongue.gif

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#6 of 9 Old 05-28-2011, 09:28 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mamakah View Post

 Springmum, in the article you posted the spider bite case has an * after it. Can you tell me what that indicates? 

 

 

Puncture wounds included stepping on a nail (15 cases), splinter (five cases), injury from barbed wire (five cases), a tattoo (one case), and a spider bite (one case).*

 

Then at the end of the section:
 

* Other puncture wounds included injuries from a screwdriver, awl, rake, pencil, rose bush, and lawnmower.

 

It seems they just listed the most common and most unusual/interesting ones in the text and used an asterisk to indicate the others were at the bottom.  

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#7 of 9 Old 05-28-2011, 09:33 AM
 
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My apologies! Thanks for posting that Pers :)
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by pers View Post



 

 

Puncture wounds included stepping on a nail (15 cases), splinter (five cases), injury from barbed wire (five cases), a tattoo (one case), and a spider bite (one case).*

 

Then at the end of the section:
 

* Other puncture wounds included injuries from a screwdriver, awl, rake, pencil, rose bush, and lawnmower.

 

It seems they just listed the most common and most unusual/interesting ones in the text and used an asterisk to indicate the others were at the bottom.  



 

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#8 of 9 Old 05-28-2011, 09:35 AM
 
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trying not go in a different direction, but are you sure it's a spider bite and not Staph (most Staph infections are confused with spider bites - I had one once I thought was a spider bite, but never saw the spider...turns out it was Staph)
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mamakah View Post

 Springmum, in the article you posted the spider bite case has an * after it. Can you tell me what that indicates? DS has what I think is a spider bite that doesn't seem to be healing and I've been a bit concerned about it the last couple of days.

The last time I read the CDC's Pink Book, it didn't mention insect bites as a "tetanus prone injury." I read such conflicting things about tetanus and insect bites.

 

Not trying to hijack the thread btw. orngtongue.gif



 

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#9 of 9 Old 05-28-2011, 10:59 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by springmum View Post

trying not go in a different direction, but are you sure it's a spider bite and not Staph (most Staph infections are confused with spider bites - I had one once I thought was a spider bite, but never saw the spider...turns out it was Staph)
 



 

Eeek! No, I'm not sure it is a spider bite. I just noticed it one day and assumed that's what it was. It's on his finger near his nail. Maybe I should post a pic in health and healing (or here) and get opinions on it.  *Off to google staph photos*
 

 

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