Study: Varicella Vaccination Has Long-Term Effectiveness - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 30 Old 04-02-2013, 08:05 PM - Thread Starter
 
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How about a new one to discuss/debate/pick apart? thumb.gif

http://www.heraldonline.com/2013/04/01/4735052/varicella-vaccine-has-long-term.html

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#2 of 30 Old 04-02-2013, 08:07 PM - Thread Starter
 
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The conflicts of interest are obvious, glaring, and important. But let's try to go deeper. I'll try to find a link to the study.

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#3 of 30 Old 04-02-2013, 08:08 PM
 
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I read about this the other day. Basically 14 years out they found thevaccine was still effective, and the rate if shingles was lower among the vaccinated children in the study than it was among children in the prevaccine era. I'm glad to see long term studies like this being dne and I hope they continue to follow up with these kids for a few more decades. So far these seem like really promising results, though.
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#4 of 30 Old 04-02-2013, 08:09 PM
 
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Here's a link to the study

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2013/03/27/peds.2012-3303

I'm interested what you consider to be the conflicts of interest.
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#5 of 30 Old 04-03-2013, 04:37 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by Rrrrrachel View Post

Here's a link to the study

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2013/03/27/peds.2012-3303

I'm interested what you consider to be the conflicts of interest.

The conflicts of interests are all spelled out in the article that I linked to. Please read it.

It looks like your link takes me to the abstract and not the actual study. The harsh lesson I've learned in my research is that there can be a vast difference! But no matter...

Children get their second varicella dose at about age 5. So according to this study's results, they're generally immune until 19. But don't worry. I'm sure they're OK after then..............

http://dailyemerald.com/2012/05/07/campus-chicken-pox-outbreak-a-concern-for-students/
http://www.syracuse.com/news./index.ssf/2010/10/su_sees_chicken_pox_outbreak.html
http://outbreaknews.com/2012/05/07/university-oregon-report-chickenpox-outbreak/

And even if some of those students had only one dose, and assuming this study design is strong and legit (something we can't determine without seeing the actual study), we only have a 14-year "guarantee." CP is nothing to monkey with in adulthood. And you seriously find this study reassuring?

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#6 of 30 Old 04-03-2013, 04:46 PM
 
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Yes. I find no signs of waning immunity 14 years out reassuring. I must be crazy.

I didn't realize you had written an article about what you saw as the conflicts of interest. I will be sure to read it.
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#7 of 30 Old 04-03-2013, 04:57 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I didn't write it. It's just linked in my first post.

I don't think you're crazy. I just need more than 14 years worth of reassurance. Adulthood lasts a lot longer than that.

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#8 of 30 Old 04-03-2013, 04:58 PM
 
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Oh ok, I was just confused because I asked what YOU thought and you referred me to the article.

 

I didn't say I would never worry about it again, but yes, I find the results reassuring.

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#9 of 30 Old 04-03-2013, 06:20 PM
 
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The actual study data is needed. There are numbers in the article not in the abstract, and visa versa. There is no way to have a serious discussion without *all* the data.

And the definition of "severe" is arbitrary. The number of pox doesn't show how ill. I was fairly covered, had no scarring, and spent my time off from school playing happily with minimal discomfort!

And just because 90% of the population gets an illness is not justification for vaccination, in my opinion.

The vaccination companies are selling the idea that we can go through life without illness. That's not likely, nor do I desire it. Not for me, and not for my family.
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#10 of 30 Old 04-03-2013, 06:25 PM
 
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I disagree with almost all of that.
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#11 of 30 Old 04-03-2013, 06:31 PM
 
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Care to elaborate on that comment? Or is this your stand-up comedy routine, again. One liner posts. Typical.
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#12 of 30 Old 04-03-2013, 06:34 PM
 
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Anecdotal data warning... I had the vaccine 4 times without any success. No antibodies. Not even a peep. Just saying... It totally works for me hahaha!

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#13 of 30 Old 04-04-2013, 12:12 AM
 
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And (according to my mother) I had chicken pox 3 times as a child (once at Christmas - I remember that one). That didn't work so well for me it seems.

Mother of two living in UK. Daughter (2007) born in USA, son (2010) born here. I'm pro natural birth, midwife care, breastfeeding, co-sleeping, baby wearing and a keen advocate of cloth diapering. I'm a full time working research scientist (physical sciences) and I'm pro-vaccine.

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#14 of 30 Old 04-04-2013, 01:15 AM
 
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I wish that one of the vaccines against a much more dangerous disease had such great long term effectivness.  I am more worried about meningitis and pertussis than chicken pox.

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#15 of 30 Old 04-04-2013, 04:19 AM
 
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One of the benefits of a live virus vaccine!
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#16 of 30 Old 04-04-2013, 06:55 AM
 
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I know of a case of a 22 months old who received the vaccine and developed shingles. It's a nasty side effect.

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#17 of 30 Old 04-04-2013, 07:29 AM
 
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The study also found shingles in vaccinated children was less than the pre vaccine era.
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#18 of 30 Old 04-04-2013, 01:02 PM
 
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And (according to my mother) I had chicken pox 3 times as a child (once at Christmas - I remember that one). That didn't work so well for me it seems.

and you think if you had the vaccine - it would have worked? 


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#19 of 30 Old 04-04-2013, 01:03 PM
 
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The study also found shingles in vaccinated children was less than the pre vaccine era.

but shingles in adults is more....what a trade off. 

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If the people let government decide what foods they eat and what medicines they take, their bodies will soon be in as sorry a state as are the souls of those who live under tyranny." Thomas Jefferson.

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#20 of 30 Old 04-04-2013, 01:09 PM
 
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Yes it is a trade off. And one I don't think is very clear cut in terms of public health policy. However, given that the us policy is what it is, the best chance i can give my child of not getting shingles is to get them vaccinated vs letting them be naturally infected.
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#21 of 30 Old 04-04-2013, 04:27 PM
 
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The study also found shingles in vaccinated children was less than the pre vaccine era.

I didn't see any evidence of this. I admit that I'm only having time for skimming, so I may have missed something. I'd appreciate a quote.
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#22 of 30 Old 04-04-2013, 04:49 PM
 
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Sure, it's easy to miss. Especially since they didn't actually say shingles, they said HZ, abbreviating for herpes zoster.
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HZ cases were mild, and rates were lower in the cohort of vaccinated children than in unvaccinated children during the prevaccine era (relative risk: 0.61 [95% confidence interval: 0.43–0.89]
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#23 of 30 Old 04-04-2013, 05:08 PM
 
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Sure, it's easy to miss. Especially since they didn't actually say shingles, they said HZ, abbreviating for herpes zoster.

It would be nice if the number of cases of shingles in each group was provided.
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#24 of 30 Old 04-04-2013, 05:14 PM
 
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What do you mean each group? I think you mean vaccinated and unvaccinated? I assume the vaccinated group is the ~7000 children in the study, not sure why they would use just a subset. The unvaccinated number isn't from an unvaccinated group, it's the rate of shingles in children before the vaccine was implemented. So I guess that group contains millions of children.
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#25 of 30 Old 04-04-2013, 06:02 PM
 
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Yes it is a trade off. And one I don't think is very clear cut in terms of public health policy. However, given that the us policy is what it is, the best chance i can give my child of not getting shingles is to get them vaccinated vs letting them be naturally infected.

Or you can take your chance that they do not get CP. No CP equals no chance of shingles.    Wild CP does seem to be decreasing.  It is a hard call. 


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#26 of 30 Old 04-04-2013, 06:34 PM
 
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yeah then they're not at risk for shingles, but they're at risk for contracting chicken pox the rest of their lives, including when it will be much more serious.

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#27 of 30 Old 04-04-2013, 06:55 PM
 
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Shingles is worse than chicken pox, though.


There is a battle of two wolves inside us.  One is good and the other is evil.  The wolf that wins is the one you feed.

 

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#28 of 30 Old 04-04-2013, 06:57 PM
 
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Is it? In adults? What about during pregnancy?
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#29 of 30 Old 04-04-2013, 07:03 PM
 
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Complications of shingles:


Postherpetic neuralgia. For some people, shingles pain continues long after the blisters have cleared. This condition is known as postherpetic neuralgia, and it occurs when damaged nerve fibers send confused and exaggerated messages of pain from your skin to your brain.
Vision loss. Shingles in or around an eye (ophthalmic shingles) can cause painful eye infections that may result in vision loss.
Neurological problems. Depending on which nerves are affected, shingles can cause an inflammation of the brain (encephalitis), facial paralysis, or hearing or balance problems.
Skin infections. If shingles blisters aren't properly treated, bacterial skin infections may develop.


Complications of chicken pox:
Bacterial infections of the skin, soft tissues, bones, joints or bloodstream (sepsis)
Pneumonia
Inflammation of the brain (encephalitis)
Toxic shock syndrome
Reye's syndrome for people who take aspirin during chickenpox

Chickenpox and pregnancy
Other complications of chickenpox affect pregnant women. Chickenpox early in pregnancy can result in a variety of problems in a newborn, including low birth weight and birth defects, such as limb abnormalities. A greater threat to a baby occurs when the mother develops chickenpox in the week before birth. Then it can cause a serious, life-threatening infection in a newborn.




Info from mayoclinic.com
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#30 of 30 Old 04-04-2013, 07:06 PM
 
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Yes, shingles is worse than chicken pox in adults.  

 

From http://www.elderparenthelp.com/shingles-painful-preventable

 

"Research puts shingles and postherpetic neuralgia on a par with congestive heart failure, diabetes and depression for disrupting a person’s quality of life. Thus, shingles can have a major impact on morbidity, lost work productivity and quality of life in older adults."

 

Chicken pox can be (rarely) dangerous during pregnancy.  As I consider fertilty issues the domain of adults, my unvaccinated daughter can make the call on whether or not to get vaccinated against chicken pox when/if she wants to start a family.  

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There is a battle of two wolves inside us.  One is good and the other is evil.  The wolf that wins is the one you feed.

 

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