"Baby's gaze May Signal Autism, a Study Finds" - Page 3 - Mothering Forums

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#61 of 65 Old 03-07-2014, 10:23 AM
 
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Originally Posted by ss834 View Post
 

I think there is a big difference between withholding concerns about milestones and introducing a premature diagnosis into the discussion.

 

This  statement sounds a bit like a false dichotomy.  There is so much grey zone between witholding concerns and a premature diagnosis.  Most primary care physicians  don't diagnose autism anyways - they are sent to a neurologist.  There is very, very little harm  (and a lot of benefit!) in having a specialist take a look if there are concerns.  

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#62 of 65 Old 03-07-2014, 10:40 AM
 
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The bottom line for me is that I am not overly concerned with worrying parents needlessly.  If I worry 5 needlessly (and to a large degree how much they worry is on them) but one child is diagnosed early and gets early treatment - then I am A-ok.  

 

I just googoled it and wait time in Canada for an autism screening is often over a year.  Then there are wait times for ABA.  My oldest nephew (with severe autism) was diagnosed with ASD at 3.5 years after being on the wait list for 18 months.  He was then on a waitlist for ABA for another 18 months - and got less that one year of ABA before being cut off because ABA in the province of Quebec is only funded until age 6.  

 

Autism is very prevalent.  Wait times for screenings and therapy can be very long and early diagnosis and therapy can make a huge difference.  Autism screening is not invasive.  To me it makes sense to take early warning signs seriously and to get on waitlist for screening sooner rather than later.

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There is a battle of two wolves inside us.  One is good and the other is evil.  The wolf that wins is the one you feed.

 

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#63 of 65 Old 03-07-2014, 10:57 AM
 
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Originally Posted by teacozy View Post
 

 

Again, you are using that quote out of context.  It's all in one paragraph whose first sentence is "If the PCP feels fairly certain that the child has a developmental disorder that falls somewhere in the autism spectrum..." and then follows with those recommendations. 

 

"Fairly certain" is not the same thing as a hunch or a suspicion. 

no I am not :)

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by teacozy View Post
 

 

 

The examples I gave earlier like toe walking, being picky about food etc are the headache in the brain tumor analogy.   Now those things combined with other very alarming symptoms like absolutely no babbling, spinning in circles for hours on end, not being interested in any human interaction etc would be like the different size pupils in your  brain tumor analogy. 

 

I know you seem quite fixated with toe walking and food but actually they are not looking at that in very young children.

 

http://www.helpguide.org/mental/autism_signs_symptoms.htm

Early signs of autism in babies and toddlers

  • Doesn’t make eye contact (e.g. look at you when being fed).
  • Doesn't smile when smiled at.
  • Doesn't respond to his or her name or to the sound of a familiar voice.
  • Doesn’t follow objects visually.
  • Doesn't point or wave goodbye or use other gestures to communicate.
  • Doesn’t follow the gesture when you point things out.
  • Doesn’t make noises to get your attention.
  • Doesn’t initiate or respond to cuddling.
  • Doesn’t imitate your movements and facial expressions.
  • Doesn’t reach out to be picked up.
  • Doesn’t play with other people or share interest and enjoyment.
  • Doesn’t ask for help or make other basic requests.

 

 

ETA- I don't know why the one part does not copy, it can be seen at the link I provided, I can see it when I posted and now when I got to edit it but it somehow does not stay the same??? - the part starts at age 6 months  

Quote:
Originally Posted by teacozy View Post
 

The question is does it do more harm than good to tell parents that she sees possible signs of autism at 12 months.  What could a parent do with this information? A lot! A child would have be incredibly severe to ever get a diagnosis that young.  A parent that brought their 12 month old to get evaluated for autism would likely be told to come back in 6 months to a year to be evaluated.   Nothing has changed, nothing can really be done.  Again, all it does it cause unnecessary parental anxiety. 

 

Now if a parent specifically asked her if she saw any possible signs and she lied, that would be unethical.  

You seem to be under the impression that only when parent specifically asks, that is not correct. 

 

Early intervention in MANY areas does occur as early as 12 months, not all of it turns out to be autism but autism is complex and involves many things, perhaps you were unaware of that?

 

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by teacozy View Post
 

 

As far as my pediatrician goes,  I don't know for sure whether she was talking about childhood disintegrative disorder or late-onset autism but she essentially stated the same thing that the other pediatrician I quoted said.   As a first time mom of course it's something I worred about (especially having a boy) and she helped reassure me that she saw absolutely zero symptoms or warning signs in my son. She said that she often notices things but doesn't necessarily worry parents by mentioning them because children all develop differently and many of them turn out completely normal.  She said she has never been surprised by an autism diagnoses in all her years of being a pediatrician, and had noticed warning signs well before the diagnosis.  I think her exact words were along the lines of "I've never had a completely normal child that I had no concerns about leave my office at their 12 month well visit and come back with an autism diagnosis at the next one. Thats never happened to me or any of my colleagues." 

 

IMO- this really seems to sum up your understanding on this 

 

You trust a physician that tells you she often notices things but doesn't worry parents by mentioning, them yet she reassured your she saw absolutely zero symptoms.

 

Personally I would Bolt.gifI consider it not only HIGHLY unprofessional but down right dishonest, I would/could never have a relationship based on honestly or trust with some like that.

 

My child's health means I must have trust and I need to feel honesty is at the upmost from my physician. 

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#64 of 65 Old 03-07-2014, 03:16 PM
 
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http://autism.lovetoknow.com/Early_Signs_of_Autism

 

Especially if you're a first-time parent, it's natural to have concerns about your child's development. However, you should trust your parental instincts and consult a doctor about any developmental concerns you may have. Early intervention is an essential part of ensuring your child's future success, and it's always better to err on the side of caution.

If you're concerned about your child's development, keep the following tips in mind:

  • Don't wait to follow up on your concerns. The earlier you get help for your child, the better his or her chances of success will be.
  • Be prepared for mixed reactions from other people. While some people will support your decision to pursue your concerns, others, possibly even your spouse or parents, may actively argue with you about your worry. Don't let this stop you from talking to a doctor.
  • Your school district is another great resource if you're concerned about your child's development. Call a local school and ask for the number of the early intervention special education coordinator. This person will set up an appointment to assess your baby's development.

 

According to the CDC, about one third of parents of children on the spectrum saw signs of autism in their child before he or she was one year old

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#65 of 65 Old 03-13-2014, 06:29 PM
 
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I think the thread got a little sidetracked by this pedi comment.

The gaze study could give some really good info re triggers of autism in susceptible babies, perhaps. Maybe without later immunizations they wouldn't have gone on to develop it? if babies have documented gaze issues, it allows for better data collection going forward, in more of a prospective vs retrospective way. If we could know who was more or less likely to have a vaccine related injury, we could protect more kids (at least from the post-natal, post-2-6 month exposures) while giving some degree of reassurance to those who want to vax.

I will make a wild guess here that any mainstream pedi is thinking things in her head that are not going into the chart, don't add up to anything concrete, but just give them an off-feeling about a child. Ever heard the phrase FLK? It is an incredibly cruel but universally known thing medically- funny looking kid. No obvious syndromes, but something just seems off beyond a usual "not a cute baby" kind of way. No pedi is going to tell you nor document that you have a "FLK." If they could say something concrete like "your child has an appearance that is concerning for this specific chromosomal abnormality" they totally do- but often it's more vague. Otherwise they will not bring it up. Decide on the ethics of that yourself but I think that's the reality. If you ask your pedi what FLK means they may claim ignorance but if you had a friend or family member who works with babies they will likely match my sentiment. But I have no published research or AAP statements to back this up, so I'm curious to hear if I'm wrong. I think this is more the sentiment expressed by the pedi, but considering it is a comment that was made a year ago, perhaps casually, and reported to us here 2nd hand, I'm surprised how enraged it is making people (if for example, bold and red and exclamation points signifies enraged? Always hard to tell online).
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