Autism rates steady for two decades - Mothering Forums

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Old 08-19-2014, 08:07 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Autism rates steady for two decades

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-0...y-decades.html

"A University of Queensland study has found no evidence of an increase in autism in the past 20 years, countering reports that the rates of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are on the rise.
Dr Baxter said she and her colleagues found that rates had remained steady, despite reports that the prevalence of ASDs was increasing.
"We found that the prevalence of ASDs in 2010 was one in 132 people, which represents no change from 1990," Dr Baxter said.
"We found that better recognition of the disorders and improved diagnostic criteria explain much of the difference in study findings over time."

Here's a link to the abstract http://journals.cambridge.org/action...3329171400172X

So what do you guys think about this?

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Old 08-19-2014, 08:33 AM
 
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Originally Posted by teacozy View Post
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-0...y-decades.html

"A University of Queensland study has found no evidence of an increase in autism in the past 20 years, countering reports that the rates of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are on the rise.
Dr Baxter said she and her colleagues found that rates had remained steady, despite reports that the prevalence of ASDs was increasing.
"We found that the prevalence of ASDs in 2010 was one in 132 people, which represents no change from 1990," Dr Baxter said.
"We found that better recognition of the disorders and improved diagnostic criteria explain much of the difference in study findings over time."

Here's a link to the abstract http://journals.cambridge.org/action...3329171400172X

So what do you guys think about this?
Did you let the CDC know?
You do know they claim different numbers, so you must be saying the CDC is mistaken or wrong?

CDC wrong, misleading... Lying???!!
My, my my!
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Old 08-19-2014, 08:48 AM
 
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Yeah, right. Tell that to the veteran special ed teachers.

Perhaps the author of this 'study' can explain why 43% of US children have a chronic illness, 54% when you figure in obesity? Or were the doctors just not diagnosing these chronically ill and obese children before? http://www.academicpedsjnl.net/artic...ract?cc=y?cc=y

Perhaps the 1 in 5 children in the US with a learning disability is because doctors are so much better at recognizing and diagnosing these days. http://www2.ed.gov/about/reports/ann...b-c/index.html

There were some interesting, intelligent comments on the study in this AoA article. http://www.ageofautism.com/2014/08/m...himerosal.html

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Old 08-19-2014, 10:15 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by Mirzam View Post
Yeah, right. Tell that to the veteran special ed teachers.

Perhaps the author of this 'study' can explain why 43% of US children have a chronic illness, 54% when you figure in obesity? Or were the doctors just not diagnosing these chronically ill and obese children before? http://www.academicpedsjnl.net/artic...ract?cc=y?cc=y

Perhaps the 1 in 5 children in the US with a learning disability is because doctors are so much better at recognizing and diagnosing these days. http://www2.ed.gov/about/reports/ann...b-c/index.html

There were some interesting, intelligent comments on the study in this AoA article. http://www.ageofautism.com/2014/08/m...himerosal.html
??

The study was not about ADD/ADHD/Obesity or other chronic illnesses so I'm not sure why you think the authors should have to "explain" those things that they didn't even mention?

The term ADD/ADHD is relatively new, so of course the number of children diagnosed with those conditions is going to be increasing.

I personally think it's way over diagnosed, but that's a topic for another day

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Old 08-19-2014, 10:18 AM
 
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Yeah, right. Tell that to the veteran special ed teachers.
Exactly.

Everyone I know who works with children knows that the number of autistic children (not just "diagnosis") has risen in the last 20 years. I wonder how long they can sing this tune. So many people call bull.

Maybe they will sing this tune until those who remember a time when huge swaths of children didn't have ASD have passed on. Rewrite history, so to speak, a new reality.

Oh, and just to be pre-emptive: I do not buy the diagnostic substitution thing as a primary factor in the rise in autism rates. There are more people with autism now than there were with the umbrella term " mental retardation" in the past.

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Last edited by kathymuggle; 08-19-2014 at 12:20 PM. Reason: added" as a primary factor" to be clearer.
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Old 08-19-2014, 10:43 AM
 
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Originally Posted by teacozy View Post
??

The study was not about ADD/ADHD/Obesity or other chronic illnesses so I'm not sure why you think the authors should have to "explain" those things that they didn't even mention?

The term ADD/ADHD is relatively new, so of course the number of children diagnosed with those conditions is going to be increasing.

I personally think it's way over diagnosed, but that's a topic for another day
Chronic illness, ADHD, learning disabilities have increased alarmingly as well. Why is that?

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Old 08-19-2014, 10:53 AM
 
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Originally Posted by teacozy View Post
[

So what do you guys think about this?
What do you think, tea? Has the number of people with autism in your community increased, based on your observation?

Please give your age and experience with children.

I will.

I am 42 yrs old. I work in a public library and have for 7 years. Before that I worked in recreation. I have had a fair bit of exposure to children in the community for most of my adult life (certainly the last 15 yrs). I have seen more and more children with autism in my community. Sometimes they are high functioning and in previous years would not have had a diagnosis, but many are more moderate to severe. My daughter works in a camp this summer. It is not geared towards ASD, but it is a high ratio camp with a learning focus. Out of 15 kids, 3 have autism. (Two moderate and one mild). My youngests daughters Girl Guide troupe of 24 girls has two with ASD, and 3 with ADHD. I do not live in an area with great services for those with ASD, for what it is worth. I live in an area where you have to drive an hour for services.

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Old 08-19-2014, 11:15 AM
 
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I spent a minute going over the article and something struck me as fishy.

Are they really trying to say that autism numbers in Australia have not increased since 1990? That certainly does not jibe with what we have seen elsewhere.

It turns out it does not jibe with the Australian bureau of statistic, either:

"The 2012 SDAC showed an estimated 115,400 Australians (0.5%) had autism. This was an 79% increase on the 64,400 people estimated to have the condition in 2009.

http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@....012&num=&view=

It seem people might be rewriting history to suit their own agenda.

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Old 08-19-2014, 11:22 AM
 
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Wow, a 79% increase in only 3 years?
Do you ever hear of someone with an autistic loved one stating that there is no real increase???

 
 
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Old 08-19-2014, 11:42 AM
 
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The abstract said this:

"Burden was calculated in terms of years lived with disability (YLDs) and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs), which are reported here by world region for 1990 and 2010."

So the study is not measuring if autism numbers have increased, the are comparing how many years on average people have lived with ASD in 1990 and 2010. Autism rates did not begin to go up in a way that would affect broad based population studies until perhaps 2000. Moreover, the average age of someone with ASD (as the numbers are climbing) is quite low.

Take a look at this graph, also from Australian bureau of stats:




Do this study agian in 20 years and see how it fairs. It is too soon for this type of study.

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Old 08-19-2014, 11:44 AM - Thread Starter
 
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What do you think, tea? Has the number of people with autism in your community increased, based on your observation?

Please give your age and experience with children.

I will.

I am 42 yrs old. I work in a public library and have for 7 years. Before that I worked in recreation. I have had a fair bit of exposure to children in the community for most of my adult life (certainly the last 15 yrs). I have seen more and more children with autism in my community. Sometimes they are high functioning and in previous years would not have had a diagnosis, but many are more moderate to severe. My daughter works in a camp this summer. It is not geared towards ASD, but it is a high ratio camp with a learning focus. Out of 15 kids, 3 have autism. (Two moderate and one mild). My youngests daughters Girl Guide troupe of 24 girls has two with ASD, and 3 with ADHD. I do not live in an area with great services for those with ASD, for what it is worth. I live in an area where you have to drive an hour for services.
It doesn't matter what you or I think, that's not how science works.

This study was interesting.

"RESULTS. The average administrative prevalence of autism among children increased from 0.6 to 3.1 per 1000 from 1994 to 2003. During the same period, the prevalence of mental retardation and learning disabilities declined by 2.8 and 8.3 per 1000, respectively. Higher autism prevalence was significantly associated with corresponding declines in the prevalence of mental retardation and learning disabilities. The declining prevalence of mental retardation and learning disabilities from 1994 to 2003 represented a significant downward deflection in their preexisting trajectories of prevalence from 1984 to 1993. California was one of a handful of states that did not clearly follow this pattern."

http://pediatrics.aappublications.or.../1028.abstract

So how do you explain the drop in prevalence of mental retardation? Is your theory that vaccines protect against mental retardation?

This study (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1...ubmed_RVDocSum) found that 25% of adults that were diagnosed in 1980 with a developmental language disorder would have met the criteria today to get an autism diagnosis.

This post written by Steven Novella goes over both of these studies, and is really interesting. http://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/...wo-hypotheses/

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Old 08-19-2014, 11:59 AM
 
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It doesn't matter what you or I think, that's not how science works.
Of course it matters what you think. If it doesn't, then why are you here? If it is just to share information, that is fine, although analysis and experience make what we share deeper. Even the articles we cherry-pick to share, and how we view them are informed by our beliefs. Beliefs are very important.

….and you did not answer the question

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Old 08-19-2014, 12:05 PM
 
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It doesn't matter what you or I think, that's not how science works.
kathymuggle,

when are you going to learn that science is not about observation????

Quote:
sci·ence
ˈsīəns/Submit
noun
the intellectual and practical activity encompassing the systematic study of the structure and behavior of the physical and natural world through observation and experiment.
pop up when you google "science-definition"

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Old 08-19-2014, 12:05 PM
 
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So how do you explain the drop in prevalence of mental retardation? Is your theory that vaccines protect against mental retardation?

[/url]
Smart-aleck. Words in mouths and all that.

In any event, you got it backwards.

I believe that autism rates have risen faster than mental retardation rates have dropped.

1/2 of all those with ASD are cognitively impaired (MR), and I believe vaccines may account for an unknown amount of this, ergo, vaccines have contributed to MR.

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Old 08-19-2014, 12:12 PM
 
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It doesn't matter what you or I think, that's not how science works.
LOL! See my signature, most people believe the person that wrote those words was one of the greatest minds ever to grace this earth.

I think it is also worthwhile to repost Liam Scheff's excellent short video entitled, "Science Says".

"Science is an interpretation of data. The data is usually crap."

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Old 08-19-2014, 12:18 PM
 
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On diagnostic substitution:

"Our findings are consistent with a recent study using data from California by Hertz-Picciotto and Delwiche which found that changes in diagnostic criteria may account for as much as one-third of the increased autism prevalence.

We have estimated that one in four children who are diagnosed with autism today would not have been diagnosed with autism in 1993. This finding does not rule out the possible contributions of other etiological factors, including environmental toxins, genetics or their interaction to the increased prevalence of autism. In fact, it helps us to recognize that such factors surely play an important role in increasing prevalence. There is no reason to believe that any of these frameworks are wrong and many reasons to believe that the increase in autism prevalence is in fact the outcome of multiple self-reinforcing processes. However, this study demonstrates that subsequent explanations for the increased prevalence of autism must take into account the effect of diagnostic change."

I did not say diagnostic substitution did not exist, I sad it did not account for the entire rise - and according to the above, it doesn't. It only account for 1/4-1/3.

http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/content/38/5/1224.full

ETA: Autism Speaks also comes down in the 1/4-1/3 range:


There is a battle of two wolves inside us.  One is good and the other is evil.  The wolf that wins is the one you feed.

 

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Old 08-19-2014, 12:58 PM
 
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I think I would reserve judgment until Dr. Brian Hooker, no doubt through several FOI requests, can access the raw data.

I wouldn't be surprised to learn that they aren't including the autism numbers from the Aboriginal people (if Aboriginal people have access to autism services to begin with); much like the CDC fudging of the African American numbers covered in the other thread.

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Old 08-19-2014, 01:13 PM
 
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This study was interesting.
I saw what you quoted but still have no idea what you found iinteresting about it. What exactly is it? You don't feel autism rates have increased (and that contradicts what the CDC says) and you find no connected EVER with vaccines (regardless about the MMR whistleblower), besides this, what is it about the study that is "interesting"?

And how do you square it with what the US health depts are (CDC, govt in general here in the US) is saying? Who here is wrong?

All these children are just over diagnosed and the rates here is the US are not correct, the rates the US govt lists are ALL wrong?

Please explain.


http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/autism/data.html

 

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Old 08-20-2014, 07:13 PM
 
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Wow, a 79% increase in only 3 years?
Do you ever hear of someone with an autistic loved one stating that there is no real increase???
I have 2 autistic sons and do not feel that there is an increase. My son's special education teacher (my son is in an inclusive special education class) has been in special ed for 30 years, and says she is not seeing an increase in autism. She is seeing an increase in CP, though. Probably because babies and preemies who used to die are now able to be kept alive. Many of the kids in my son's class are former preemies.

And please do not attack me or my sons. You asked, and I answered.
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Old 08-20-2014, 08:43 PM
 
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I have 2 autistic sons and do not feel that there is an increase. My son's special education teacher (my son is in an inclusive special education class) has been in special ed for 30 years, and says she is not seeing an increase in autism. She is seeing an increase in CP, though. Probably because babies and preemies who used to die are now able to be kept alive. Many of the kids in my son's class are former preemies.

And please do not attack me or my sons. You asked, and I answered.
Are you disagreeing with the CDC that there is a rise?

I thought I had previously read you had one son with autism, but you have two? Sorry to hear that.

Personally the schools in our area went from zero classes to one for the district in the mid 90's and now we have several, several in each school, just for autistic alone.
Other special need students classes have not risen.

Our district gives reports so I do know the need for teachers and aids has also increased vastly in the past 30 years along with my taxes.


ETA-if you have 2 children both autistic, is that not an increase over what past trends have shown? Again, even the CDC says that now your chances are greatly increased if you already have one child with autism, so two is increasing the numbers, is it not?

http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/autism/facts.html#ref

Children who have a sibling with ASD are at a higher risk of also having ASD. 5-10

 

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Old 08-20-2014, 09:08 PM
 
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I have worked in schools, - public, private, religious, rural, urban, suburban - since 1970 and I can assure you that the autism rate has gone from 0 to at least three in each classroom in my part of the world. That is an astronomical rise.

Has anyone read the book, SonRise, about the Kaufman family? It was about a family whose son had autism and were told to institutionize him. However they worked with him themselves and helped him overcome it. Raun Kaufman runs the center in Portland, OR to help autistics today with what helped him. He is 41 years old. He claims the autistic tendencies may have come from an antibiotic regiment for an ear infection early in life which caused severe dehydration. He was soon diagnosed as severely autistic. Just guessing, but I am sure it upset his gut balance.

All medical interventions early in life should be suspect for changes in behavior.


http://www.autismtreatmentcenter.org/
Amazon Amazon
published in 1976 when he was 3 yrs old.

When I read stories like this, I know that the answer is outside of medicine - yes the people who supposedly are specially trained and spend their entire lives studying medicine and behavior.

Why people keep turning to the "experts" who hurt them in the first place is beyond me.

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Old 08-21-2014, 07:34 AM
 
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I thought I had previously read you had one son with autism, but you have two? Sorry to hear that.
I thought that as well.

"From Anti-Vax to Pro-Vax: Natural Parenting Perspective"

"I don't tend to bring it up, either. But when they find out my son has autism, it's the first question." Post 7.

Please clarify.

There is a battle of two wolves inside us.  One is good and the other is evil.  The wolf that wins is the one you feed.

 

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Old 08-21-2014, 09:49 AM
 
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The school is one of the few of its kind in Utah and the nation — a free public school serving kids with autism. The school first opened in North Salt Lake in 2006 and has since seen huge demand. This year, school leaders opened the Pleasant Grove campus to about 430 pupils in grades K-8, hoping to ease some pressure in North Salt Lake.
But demand has surged. The North Salt Lake campus has a waiting list of about 675 students, and the new Pleasant Grove school already has about 150 on its waiting list, said Brad Nelson, Spectrum director of development and finance. http://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/news/58...utism.html.csp
my bold

If the numbers have been the same, wouldn't this school (and these types of schools) have existed previous to 2006?

Quote:
We're announcing today that we have been able to secure $4 million of state funding directed toward Western Michigan University so we can increase the capacity to train professionals, and so that, hopefully throughout this state, we will no longer have families waiting up to two years to get services.http://wmich.edu/news/2014/06/16702"
If the numbers have been the same, why the need for more money to train more professionals and why is there a wait period of two years to get services? The need for therapies such as speech & OT doesn't increase because the labels have changed.

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Old 08-21-2014, 11:55 AM
 
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"RESULTS. The average administrative prevalence of autism among children increased from 0.6 to 3.1 per 1000 from 1994 to 2003. During the same period, the prevalence of mental retardation and learning disabilities declined by 2.8 and 8.3 per 1000, respectively. Higher autism prevalence was significantly associated with corresponding declines in the prevalence of mental retardation and learning disabilities. The declining prevalence of mental retardation and learning disabilities from 1994 to 2003 represented a significant downward deflection in their preexisting trajectories of prevalence from 1984 to 1993. California was one of a handful of states that did not clearly follow this pattern."

So how do you explain the drop in prevalence of mental retardation? Is your theory that vaccines protect against mental retardation?
A big part of the reason that rates of intellectual disability has dropped is because of the use of adaptive behavior as a qualifying criteria in addition to IQ scores. With IQ scores alone, a disproportionate level of low SES and minority children where labeled as intellectually disabled who were completely functional outside of schools. The inclusion of adaptive behavior is the biggest reason for the drop.

Another reason for the drop is prenatal testing and abortion. In 85% of cases where a pregnant woman learns that her baby has Down's (which is the leading chromosomal cause of intellectual disability) she aborts.

The rates of PKU, Rh, and neural tubes defects (all of which are associated with intellectual disabilities) have also gone down due to medical intervention.

Fetal alcohol syndrome is the leading cause of preventable intellectual disability, and I can't find stats on whether it is increasing or decreasing. However, since the surgeon general only added their warnings in the 80's, one would hope that rates of intellectual disability caused by drinking have dropped since then.

But to look at rates of intellectual disability and think that the ONLY reason they are going down is increase identification of autism is just ignorant, in the true sense of the word. There are many, many factors at play.

The prevelence of LDs is very, very complicated because we keep switching how we define and test for it. It is a completely social defined disability (as opposed to being blind or deaf that is the same across cultures and time). But in the period referenced in this study, response to intervention (RTI) was added to the federal definition. So children who would have been required to be labeled as LD to recieve assisteance before this change are now given assistance without any label through RTI. For many of these students, this is enough and they are never labeled. This is a massive shift. It is also possible that some kids were IDed with LD during the whole language movement who really just needed explicit instruction.

Back to autism.

One of the ways they decide prevalence statistics is how many kids received services at school based on certain diagnosis. This is easily tracked. IDEA defines which categories can receive services under.
Autism was only added as a category in IDEA n 1990. Before that, children with autism frequently had other labels in school, such as intellectually disability, other health impaired, speech or language impairment, or emotionally disabled. The reason that it was added as a category is because the rates had already gone up. It used to be very rare, and now it isn't.

Of course creating an actual category in IDEA switched kids from other categories. But that doesn't account the rapid increase, the actual changes in demographics that made creating that category make sense.

In special ed, autism is the fastest growing category. If this were ONLY a matter of switching how kids are categorized, then we would have seen a huge jump in the first few years after the category was created, but then it would have taped off to whatever the "real" level is. It's been 24 years and there isn't a tapering off -- instead the rates continue to rise.

And no body really knows why.


NOTES:

A lot of the information in the post came from "Mental Retardation: An Introduction to Intellectual Disabilities" by Beirne-Smith and from "Exceptional Children: An Introduction to Special Education" by Heward.

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Old 08-21-2014, 01:17 PM - Thread Starter
 
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@Linda

The study was only looking at a 9 year gap from 1994-2003.

Screening for Down syndrome, PKU, RH etc and warnings about fetal alcohol syndrome were routine long before then.

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Old 08-21-2014, 01:44 PM
 
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@Linda

The study was only looking at a 9 year gap from 1994-2003.

Screening for Down syndrome, PKU, RH etc and warnings about fetal alcohol syndrome were routine long before then.
And your point is what? Are you saying the CDC is lying?

As I asked you prior you must be saying those posters here & the CDC are ALL incorrect - is that the case?
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Old 08-21-2014, 05:21 PM
 
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Screening for Down syndrome, PKU, RH etc and warnings about fetal alcohol syndrome were routine long before then.
the dates for all of these things vary, but, with the exception of RH, they all require action on the part of parents (or expectant parents) and so their impact has increased over time. PKU for example requires a very precise diet, and I suspect that motivation to follow through with that increased over time.

Fetal alcohol syndrome is still a leading cause of mental retardation, so the notion that the warnings that started by issued in the 90s had made their entire impact prior to 1994 doesn't follow. Changing social norms takes times.

Is your argument really that there are no other reasons that intellectual disability rates are declining other than more accurate labeling of autism? A tremendous amount of research and public awareness has gone into reducing intellectually disabilities, and the rates have gone down. But you are arguing that none of it has made a difference.

Do you know that an intellectually disability that comes about at any point during childhood counts, so decreasing traumatic brain injuries because of increasing bike helmets and car restraints both effect this statistic. Again, these are social changes that have taken time.

I agree that more accurate labeling is a factor, just not the only one, and most likely not the primary one.

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Old 08-21-2014, 05:41 PM
 
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the dates for all of these things vary, but, with the exception of RH, they all require action on the part of parents (or expectant parents) and so their impact has increased over time. PKU for example requires a very precise diet, and I suspect that motivation to follow through with that increased over time.

Fetal alcohol syndrome is still a leading cause of mental retardation, so the notion that the warnings that started by issued in the 90s had made their entire impact prior to 1994 doesn't follow. Changing social norms takes times.

Is your argument really that there are no other reasons that intellectual disability rates are declining other than more accurate labeling of autism? A tremendous amount of research and public awareness has gone into reducing intellectually disabilities, and the rates have gone down. But you are arguing that none of it has made a difference.

Do you know that an intellectually disability that comes about at any point during childhood counts, so decreasing traumatic brain injuries because of increasing bike helmets and car restraints both effect this statistic. Again, these are social changes that have taken time.

I agree that more accurate labeling is a factor, just not the only one, and most likely not the primary one.
Unless Teacozy clarifies something different, apparently Australia found NO increase in autism. The CDC says THERE is an increase and Teacozy has been arguing there has been NO increase and agreeing with the Australia study.

Tea are you still saying the CDC, the members on here and all the information provided is still all wrong and that there is NO increase in those affected by autism?

 

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Old 08-21-2014, 06:04 PM - Thread Starter
 
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the dates for all of these things vary, but, with the exception of RH, they all require action on the part of parents (or expectant parents) and so their impact has increased over time. PKU for example requires a very precise diet, and I suspect that motivation to follow through with that increased over time.

Fetal alcohol syndrome is still a leading cause of mental retardation, so the notion that the warnings that started by issued in the 90s had made their entire impact prior to 1994 doesn't follow. Changing social norms takes times.

Is your argument really that there are no other reasons that intellectual disability rates are declining other than more accurate labeling of autism? A tremendous amount of research and public awareness has gone into reducing intellectually disabilities, and the rates have gone down. But you are arguing that none of it has made a difference.

Do you know that an intellectually disability that comes about at any point during childhood counts, so decreasing traumatic brain injuries because of increasing bike helmets and car restraints both effect this statistic. Again, these are social changes that have taken time.

I agree that more accurate labeling is a factor, just not the only one, and most likely not the primary one.
PKU screening was mandatory for all newborns in nearly all 50 states by 1975, well before 1994. (http://biotech.law.lsu.edu/research/.../appendix5.htm)

Down syndrome has actually been increasing in prevalence due to mothers having children later in age, not decreasing. "Reporting in the Nov. 30 issue of Pediatrics, scientists say the prevalence of live born infants with Down syndrome increased by 31% between 1979 and 2003, from 9 to 11.8 per 10,000 live births in the 10 U.S. regions studied."

Even combining the three most common causes of mental retardation (Down syndrome, Fragile X and FAS) that still only accounts for 30% of all cases of mental retardation. http://www.minddisorders.com/Kau-Nu/...tardation.html

This is what the study I linked said "During the same period, the prevalence of mental retardation and learning disabilities declined by 2.8 and 8.3 per 1000, respectively. "

If you have evidence that a reduction in fetal alcohol syndrome was that dramatic during that time period to account for that reduction in diagnoses, then provide it. You are the one making the claim, it is not on me to me to disprove it.

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Old 08-21-2014, 06:56 PM
 
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PKU screening was mandatory for all newborns in nearly all 50 states by 1975, well before 1994. (http://biotech.law.lsu.edu/research/.../appendix5.htm)

Down syndrome has actually been increasing in prevalence due to mothers having children later in age, not decreasing. "Reporting in the Nov. 30 issue of Pediatrics, scientists say the prevalence of live born infants with Down syndrome increased by 31% between 1979 and 2003, from 9 to 11.8 per 10,000 live births in the 10 U.S. regions studied."

Even combining the three most common causes of mental retardation (Down syndrome, Fragile X and FAS) that still only accounts for 30% of all cases of mental retardation. http://www.minddisorders.com/Kau-Nu/...tardation.html

This is what the study I linked said "During the same period, the prevalence of mental retardation and learning disabilities declined by 2.8 and 8.3 per 1000, respectively. "

If you have evidence that a reduction in fetal alcohol syndrome was that dramatic during that time period to account for that reduction in diagnoses, then provide it. You are the one making the claim, it is not on me to me to disprove it.

Are you still claiming the CDC is lying about autism?

Are you still clamping there is NO increase in autism?

 

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