How many of you are (were) teachers? - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 37 Old 11-19-2008, 01:45 AM - Thread Starter
 
koru's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: chicagoland
Posts: 2,426
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
And if you are, did you choose to HS because of what you saw during your years teaching or for reasons totally unrelated? And does anyone homeschool your own while teaching in a school system, at the same time?

It seems that, so many times while browing this forum, I encounter posts that refer to being a teacher & I started wondering why that is. Could be just the odds, I guess.

I'm married to a public school teacher & that fact is often brought up when I mention homeschooling. I just say it's similar to me being a nurse as well as a strong proponent of natural health....and homebirth.

stephanie asl.gif

koru is offline  
#2 of 37 Old 11-19-2008, 02:10 AM
 
MyLittleWonders's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Always learning something new.
Posts: 8,275
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm a former school teacher also married to a current school teacher. Our shared experiences have definitely influenced greatly our decision to homeschool. We both respect the need for schools, but at the same time, do not feel they are a place where our children would best learn and grow. Our own personal experiences in school as students played a part in our decision too. We are not fans of institutionalized schooling, but at the same time, I am very grateful that there are people like my dh and my cousin, who are wonderful teachers, there doing their best for the students that come through their doors.

What I find ironic is the people that point to my years as a teacher (or dh being a teacher) as validating our "ability" to homeschool - the "Oh, you can do that because you used to teach" mentality. I have found that my training and experience teaching has been nothing more than a detriment to my ability to homeschool my children.

 Me + dh = heartbeat.gif ds (7/01), ds (11/03), ds (6/06)
and dd born 11/21/10 - our T21 SuperBaby ribbluyel.gif heartbeat.gif
MyLittleWonders is offline  
#3 of 37 Old 11-19-2008, 02:18 AM
 
sbgrace's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 9,223
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm a former teacher. I think we're all influenced by our experiences so of course my experiences as a teacher influenced me. I'm driven by the benefits for my kids though rather than the problems with education today. I know I can meet their needs better than a classroom. However, I think I would have figured it out even if I hadn't been a teacher.

Rachelle, mommy to 8 year old boys! 

My Blog-free homeschooling finds and my lesson plans and link to the new User Agreement

sbgrace is offline  
#4 of 37 Old 11-19-2008, 02:48 AM
 
Lillian J's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 9,065
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Maybe it's just that more people who were teachers realize that it's not all that daunting to provide a good education outside of school? I didn't like what I saw in the schools when I started out as a substitute, but that wasn't a direct reason for homeschooling. It was, however, the reason I looked for more holistic private schools that used creative methods and thought differently about how things could be presented - but it was in finding that even the private schools couldn't or wouldn't provide for individual needs that made me suddenly think of homeschooling. And it turned out to be much, much more wonderful than I'd even imagined it might be. Lillian
Lillian J is offline  
#5 of 37 Old 11-19-2008, 03:20 AM
 
alegna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 44,408
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I was a teacher.

Teacher related reasons we'll be homeschooling:

teachers don't have any magical knowledge about how to teach or subject matter.
my children are individuals
one size fits none
school is designed to take up their whole lives- I want them to have real lives
I don't want to raise cogs

-Angela
alegna is offline  
#6 of 37 Old 11-19-2008, 04:18 AM
 
lovbeingamommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 1,929
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Yes, I'm a teacher/administrator right now. I see how the public school is run in my state of AZ and how much is spent per child and it's pathetic. I see children having to learn everything within the confins of a four wall classroom - Yuck!! I also see the high stakes and stresses of standardized testing. The majority of teachers that I've seen teach (in their classrooms) teach to one level and basically from the teacher's manual. No creativity or individuality. There's also not much original thinking going on...it's mostly I'm the teacher and I'm going to fill your vessel (mind) with facts and figures. OMG - THat's not what we need for our 21st century learners where collaboration and technology is key and thinking creatively is so important.

Another thing that really bothers me with P.S. is the fact that a child's interests are rarely taken into account when it come sto teaching the curriculum. It's generally this worksheet-driven cr@p that has no application to real live and genuine learning - mostly facts and figures - the lower level thinking skills How will our children compete in a global society with this type of education? That's what I wonder and that's why I will homeschool/unschool or start my own private school with like-minded teachers in the next few years. Americans can't afford to fall any farther behind when it comes to the areas of math and science. Changes need to be made and it's sad to see countries not even as well off as the U.S. far exceeding us in so many areas. I've taught in Europe so I say this with first-hand experience. We're in trouble unless changes are made and soon...IMO!!

Kate, Wife to DH and Mommy to a 5yo lovin' DS; three angels 4/08 9/08 3/10 in Heaven,
waitin' for my baby

lovbeingamommy is offline  
#7 of 37 Old 11-19-2008, 07:59 AM
 
Marsupialmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: St. Louis MO
Posts: 9,500
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We have done traditional mom does and directed all to now a state funded cyber school....

It is amazing with this cyberschool at how many of the teachers were:

1. Homeschooled themselves
2. Homeschooling a family member
3. Have this job so they can juggle homeschooling and actually pay the bills.
4. There spouce is homeschooling/cyber schooling their child.
Marsupialmom is offline  
#8 of 37 Old 11-19-2008, 09:38 AM
 
mommy68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 6,599
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by alegna View Post
I was a teacher.

Teacher related reasons we'll be homeschooling:

teachers don't have any magical knowledge about how to teach or subject matter.
my children are individuals
one size fits none
school is designed to take up their whole lives- I want them to have real lives
I don't want to raise cogs

-Angela
I love this.

Single (divorced), self-employed working, college student MOM to:

 

17 yr old

11 yr old 

 4 yr old

mommy68 is offline  
#9 of 37 Old 11-19-2008, 10:46 AM
 
earthmama369's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 6,989
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Another teacher here.

I loved my school kids and I loved teaching them and learning with them, and I always learned a ton from them. But I look at my kids and their individual needs, and especially I look at what No Child Left Behind has done to our schools since I stopped teaching in-system, and I don't want to put them in that learning situation. I think they'd be ok, but we can do better teaching them within a community setting.
earthmama369 is offline  
#10 of 37 Old 11-19-2008, 11:54 AM
 
pinky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 1,828
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I was a teacher.

I taught at a couple of pretty great schools and honestly didn't plan to homeschool. As the time approached for kindergarten, though, it just felt like the right thing to do. So here we are.

Sometimes that I think being a teacher is actually a hindrance as a homeschooling mom. While I do think that it gives me confidence, I think I have a lot more deschooling/unlearning to do as I take this very different path.
pinky is offline  
#11 of 37 Old 11-19-2008, 04:09 PM
 
Lillian J's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 9,065
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by pinky View Post
Sometimes that I think being a teacher is actually a hindrance as a homeschooling mom. While I do think that it gives me confidence, I think I have a lot more deschooling/unlearning to do as I take this very different path.
Absolutely! Very common.

I used to occasionally get calls for the local homeschool support group I volunteered for from people wanting to run ads in the newsletter about classes they taught. They'd think it was an advantage to mention that they were credentialed teachers, but I advised them that it would actually make their ad less attractive to the majority of readers. It's hard to understand that until you've been on this side of the fence - but there's a huge difference between teaching school and helping a child learn things in a home setting or small homeschool group. - Lillian
Lillian J is offline  
#12 of 37 Old 11-19-2008, 04:22 PM
 
karemore's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Hudson Valley NY
Posts: 739
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My husband was a teacher and it was his idea to hs our daughter.

I think what he saw in the schools influenced his decision, and we're in a much worse school district than where he was teaching.

Also I think because he taught, he knows we can do it at home. It adds to his confidence.

He also had friends who hsed their kids all the way through, so that also helped with his decision.

If DH is laid off from his corporate job, he will go back to teaching in the public schools.

We're not anti-schools, just pro-Susie (DD)
karemore is offline  
#13 of 37 Old 11-19-2008, 05:29 PM
 
lovbeingamommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 1,929
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lillian J View Post


Absolutely! Very common.

I used to occasionally get calls for the local homeschool support group I volunteered for from people wanting to run ads in the newsletter about classes they taught. They'd think it was an advantage to mention that they were credentialed teachers, but I advised them that it would actually make their ad less attractive to the majority of readers. It's hard to understand that until you've been on this side of the fence - but there's a huge difference between teaching school and helping a child learn things in a home setting or small homeschool group. - Lillian
I'm very interested in your point of view as to why you think being a qualified teacher would be a hinderance to hs'ing? Would it be possible to give some specific examples Thanks, Kate

Kate, Wife to DH and Mommy to a 5yo lovin' DS; three angels 4/08 9/08 3/10 in Heaven,
waitin' for my baby

lovbeingamommy is offline  
#14 of 37 Old 11-19-2008, 05:32 PM
 
lovbeingamommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 1,929
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by pinky View Post
I was a teacher.

I taught at a couple of pretty great schools and honestly didn't plan to homeschool. As the time approached for kindergarten, though, it just felt like the right thing to do. So here we are.

Sometimes that I think being a teacher is actually a hindrance as a homeschooling mom. While I do think that it gives me confidence, I think I have a lot more deschooling/unlearning to do as I take this very different path.
Just as in my above post, I'm interested in specific examples from your point of view also as to why it's a hinderance to be a qualified teacher and homeschooling?

Kate, Wife to DH and Mommy to a 5yo lovin' DS; three angels 4/08 9/08 3/10 in Heaven,
waitin' for my baby

lovbeingamommy is offline  
#15 of 37 Old 11-19-2008, 05:45 PM
 
Lillian J's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 9,065
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovbeingamommy View Post
I'm very interested in your point of view as to why you think being a qualified teacher would be a hinderance to hs'ing? Would it be possible to give some specific examples Thanks, Kate
Ah! But I didn't say "qualified" - I said "certified." There's a difference. You can be highly qualified without being certified.

It's almost an apples and bananas kind of thing. Learning how to handle the teaching of subjects in a classroom situation by way of certification involves a more complex structure and usually the learning of traditional school methodology and philosophy. But homeschoolers hiring someone to teach a class generally expect a much more casual and personal experience more up close and personal, informal and individualized - the way parents would teach something to their own children.

But if you're asking about it in the sense of a parent beginning to homeschool her own children, the problem is a little different. It means unlearning emphasis on teaching and learning emphasis on the learner learning. This is something I went through myself, and it's something I've seen many people speak about on bulletin boards and in email lists over the years.

This example is a bit different, but the only one that comes to mind right off - it has to do with the way some docents/guides have a tendency to be with children at various exhibits. I wrote about this for one of Linda Dobson's books, but that might be one in which they gave us all pseudonyms, so I might have been identified as "Lorraine" or "Renee." I'm just mentioning that so I don't sound as if I'm lifting someone else's story ... Here's what I wrote in a recent thread about field trips:
I also thought of a homeschool support group outing to see a Monet exhibit in San Francisco. The docent assigned to our group was trying to make it into a school-like experience, and it just wasn't working. Our children were fascinated by the paintings, and they were quiet and attentive, but that wasn't enough for her. She'd be telling them something interesting while they were standing there thinking and daydreaming about what she was saying, clearly enjoying it, and she'd suddenly break the spell by asking them some inane and needless question to make them demonstrate that they were getting the lesson she was trying to present. At first they'd just stare, because it was so strange - such an abrupt interruption in what had been a productive thinking process - and finally someone would have to give her an answer, just because it was obvious that she had no intention of continuing until she got one. Then they could get back to enjoying hearing about the paintings until the next time she felt she needed to quiz them. So the idea is that trained teachers often have the tendency to feel they need to be "teaching" when actually they'd be better off letting the children learn in their own way - just the way adults are allowed the respect of learning in their own ways.

I hope that helps. - Lillian
Lillian J is offline  
#16 of 37 Old 11-19-2008, 06:30 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Lost in a good book (in San Diego)
Posts: 4,819
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We're considering HSing and I am a teacher. I get what people are saying; I feel like I will bring some benefits from my teaching experiences but I will also have to unlearn a lot of things, too. Like, I can tell I'm doing a good job giving DD experiences right in her zone of proximal development and letting her go crazy exploring things... but I also worry that when we get into more school-aged years that I'll have to break habits formed while keeping the "show" going teaching classes of 40 students for two hours a day... even though the best educators stress learning goals and not just activities, when you're dealing with the overwheling realities of teaching in a public school (especially with kids who buy into the system heavily, as mine did), sometimes it's easiest to just do things that look like school, that your kids will accept and resepct you for, and your administrators and parents will approve of.

However, just helping my lil bro edit his papers lately has made me very excited about homeschooling. It's like all of the drag of trying to corrall all these skills and topics and students all together fell away, and it was him and me and I could talk to him about what he was writing and how he might change it and why... I think HSing will be humbling as I get out of the way of my daughter's learning but also madly satisfying as I finally can just BE with my student(s) and really know that they are learning, without artificial and unreliable assessments.
St. Margaret is offline  
#17 of 37 Old 11-19-2008, 06:36 PM
 
Lillian J's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 9,065
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by St. Margaret View Post
I think HSing will be humbling as I get out of the way of my daughter's learning but also madly satisfying as I finally can just BE with my student(s) and really know that they are learning, without artificial and unreliable assessments.
You hit that right on the head! Humbling it is, for sure - and with a deep and growing satisfaction that makes up for the initial shock(s). - Lillian
Lillian J is offline  
#18 of 37 Old 11-19-2008, 06:41 PM
 
sbgrace's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 9,223
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lillian J View Post


So the idea is that trained teachers often have the tendency to feel they need to be "teaching" when actually they'd be better off letting the children learn in their own way - just the way adults are allowed the respect of learning in their own ways.

I hope that helps. - Lillian
I'm not sure there is a corner on this market with former teachers--or even that it is more likely in former teachers. I think that is how must of us were taught. So people think that's how learning is conducted because it's how they experienced "school". As a teacher I know better..I know how learning happens through experience and internal reflection. And it's partially why No Child Left Behind has made school less than it was before. That the majority of school isn't done the way I know a student learns best is one of the reasons I know I can do better.

I guess I'm saying in my experience I've found that most (non-teacher profession) people try to teach in the way you describe when they are placed in teaching situations. The average experienced homeschool mom would do a much better job I'm sure. I'm talking about the secretary who is teaching Sunday School--she teachers the way she remembers school. And I've watched many non-teacher parents try to "teach" their young kids in this way.

Rachelle, mommy to 8 year old boys! 

My Blog-free homeschooling finds and my lesson plans and link to the new User Agreement

sbgrace is offline  
#19 of 37 Old 11-19-2008, 06:42 PM
 
birdie22's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: NJ
Posts: 1,308
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
You can count me among those who are certified but not qualified. I have a teaching degree, but I never followed through and worked in a school.

For me, deschooling myself meant re-examining my whole framework of knowledge. For example, why have an area of knowledge called "social studies?" So much falls under that category that could easily overlap into other fields. In a homeschool setting, it may make more sense for a child to learn "social studies" as it is encountered naturally in life, interwoven among various areas of study.

How about "grammar?" What is grammar but a way to evaluate whether a person is speaking/writing according to accepted usage? If my son knows how to use adverbs correctly, does it matter that he doesn't know it's called an adverb? The point here is that if I know he understands something, I can let go of the constant evaluation that is necessary in a class.

Grades and grade levels are another area that caught me. I always assumed that school curricula were written by experts who knew what was best for children at each age. I felt that if I homeschooled, I would need to ensure that my child stayed "at grade level." Now I've come to see that every curriculum is arbitrary at some level, and no child fits the model perfectly. Even among school districts, children will be taught different skills at different ages, and some children will inevitably be promoted without mastering all the skills taught.

Please don't interpret this to mean I have anything against social studies or grammar, or those who choose to specifically teach them. These are just a few examples of ways MY mind has changed since I've been reading about homeschooling.


Dawn - Mom to : Jack 11/04 and David 5/08
birdie22 is offline  
#20 of 37 Old 11-19-2008, 06:47 PM
 
Lillian J's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 9,065
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by birdie22 View Post
Please don't interpret this to mean I have anything against social studies or grammar, or those who choose to specifically teach them. These are just a few examples of ways MY mind has changed since I've been reading about homeschooling.

Well, you're way ahead of the game - I think the majority of people don't get there till they've gone through a lot of experience and seen it with their own eyes. Lillian
Lillian J is offline  
#21 of 37 Old 11-19-2008, 06:48 PM
 
Lillian J's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 9,065
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by sbgrace View Post
I'm not sure there is a corner on this market with former teachers--or even that it is more likely in former teachers.
I think it's just that former teachers might come into it with a little more oomph in their confidence. Lillian
Lillian J is offline  
#22 of 37 Old 11-22-2008, 01:52 AM
 
camprunner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 1,610
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
  1. Dh doesn't like he way that public school children behave (he is also a teacher)
  2. DD has abilities that vary wildly. High reading and math, writing ability is developing late.
  3. Three hours was too much homework in public K
  4. Children honestly learn to behave better IMO when they are only listening to one set of expectations.

On the last one...my child did not behave well at all before we began homeschooling. DH and I had different ideas on how to raise children and no one was giving in. She had a teacher at school who had even different ways of handling discipline. She had a Sunday School teacher who couldn't mind her own business and was always butting in. We had a set of grandparents who weren't backing us. She didn't see any of us enough to care while she was in public K and did things her own way.

Now that she is with me almost all day. She has one set of expectations (dh has almost no choice but to back me when he gets home) and understands that things at our house are consistant and the rules are not going to change. She has become a very well behaved angel (not over night but quicker than one would think).

Anyway, I was an advocate of homeschooling before we started. I just realized that when she went to K I had to make it a priority the next year.
camprunner is offline  
#23 of 37 Old 11-22-2008, 04:01 AM
 
Satori's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Earth, I think, kids say Cybertron
Posts: 7,901
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by koru View Post
And if you are, did you choose to HS because of what you saw during your years teaching or for reasons totally unrelated? And does anyone homeschool your own while teaching in a school system, at the same time?

It seems that, so many times while browing this forum, I encounter posts that refer to being a teacher & I started wondering why that is. Could be just the odds, I guess.

I'm married to a public school teacher & that fact is often brought up when I mention homeschooling. I just say it's similar to me being a nurse as well as a strong proponent of natural health....and homebirth.

I'm not a former teacher but I always found it amusing that our superintendent home schooled his kids rather then send them to schools he worked for It was a fact he kept rather private, we only found out because we ran into him at a bookstore an hour from us and he had his kids with him and they fessed up

Seriously?
Satori is offline  
#24 of 37 Old 11-22-2008, 04:34 AM
 
lovbeingamommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 1,929
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Ok, I've thought long and hard about this and as a certified, highly-qualified teacher for almost 20 years I am at an advantage of hs'ing my DS when the time comes. The reason why I know this is because I've always considered myself as a facilitator of my students' learning. I let their interest drive the learning environment that I set up. The majority of my "facilitating" is done through differentiation (meaning that each child gets what they need, when and how they need it - with their interests always taken into account) No two children learn in the same way and this is why the concept of differentiation has been so important to me throughout my teaching career. I have been extremely lucky to have been at public schools that allow for this type of learning to occur. However, I've noticed within the past 4-5 yrs the p.s. system is becoming more regimented everyday and everything is driven by those test scores

So because of this I will most likely not teach in the regular classroom again in a p.s

Kate, Wife to DH and Mommy to a 5yo lovin' DS; three angels 4/08 9/08 3/10 in Heaven,
waitin' for my baby

lovbeingamommy is offline  
#25 of 37 Old 11-22-2008, 12:16 PM
 
UUMom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 9,777
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I've also noticed that these days the people who go into teaching like and care about children. (Rather than it being the only job they can get besides being a nurse).

One reason more teachers than research scientists or MDs might homeschool, for instance, is that teachers are able to support and nurture and facilitate (the reasons they became teachers) children anywhere, and once a mother, they can still do what they love, but at home with their own kids, and with more freedom and without the red tape of testing etc.

A doctor or scientist or midwife who loves her work, fi, can't exactly do surgery or DNA research, or help deliver babies in her own home etc.
UUMom is offline  
#26 of 37 Old 11-23-2008, 02:17 AM
 
Mizelenius's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: In Lalaland
Posts: 7,046
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by koru View Post
And if you are, did you choose to HS because of what you saw during your years teaching or for reasons totally unrelated? And does anyone homeschool your own while teaching in a school system, at the same time?

I'm married to a public school teacher & that fact is often brought up when I mention homeschooling. I just say it's similar to me being a nurse as well as a strong proponent of natural health....and homebirth.
On DD's last day, her teacher announced that DD was going to be homeschooled . . .because I was a teacher.

My mom started a school with her friend, so I always assumed that would be the school my children would attend. We moved, so it was no longer an option. I only seriously started considering HSing a few months ago. DD spent the last school year hating KG (even with a caring teacher and lovely friends), and then again this year. So, I would say my reason for doing it is due to DD's dislike of school and my fear of her losing her love of learning, though I can certainly find a million reasons why HSing is my preference anyway.

RE: the nurse who homebirths . . .I had one when I was in the hospital. I LOVED that she had homebirths, because I knew I could trust that she was going to help me make my hospital experience as close to the ideal, which I think is a homebirth (a hospital birth with a MW was the compromise DH and I made). If I knew a teacher homeschooled his/her children (without trying to "do school" at home), and taught my child, I'd be thrilled, because I'd know we would have the same goals.

 2/02, 4/05, 2/07, 11/09, and EDD 12/25/11 wave.gif

 

 

Mizelenius is offline  
#27 of 37 Old 11-23-2008, 11:01 AM
 
petra_william's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: england or away in a dreamland
Posts: 236
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Im not a teacher as such - I went to school in AUstria myself and somehow if I would still be living in Austria I don't think I would be so opposed to the PS system. I studied to be a Kindergarten Teacher for 5 years and had about 3 or 4 months of placements in Kindergartens in Austria. I think I would be pretty ok to send my child to Kindergarten in Austria as all apart from one (due to the teacher who has now "resigned") have been lovely environments and had nothing to fault them really. (well... i could probably find something to fault them like children crying in the mornings not wanting to be left but parents having to go to work and some older children "bullying" or generally not "behaving" and being "difficult"...)
Anyways... I came to live in ENgland after I successfully passed my A - levels (graduated in other words) I worked hear as a Nanny for just over a year before i fell pregnant myself.
I suppose I owe it partly to my mum that i have decided to homeschool my child because before i started nannying she encouraged me to buy baby books and magazines to get an idea of how to look after babies (as my education had focused on the age group 3 - 6 year olds)
i started reading all the mainstream parenting advice and I have to admit that i followed quite a lot of it - even working on a sleeping routine / controlled crying technique with the childs parents...
but then i found the more crunchy websites and books and took to them like a duck to water
But even then working as a nanny confirmed my beliefs that children should stay with their parents until they are at LEAST 3 years old. I grew to hate the idea that kids started school at 4 or 5 here in england. when i fell pregnant I decided to HS my child until he was at least 6 years old at which point i felt it would be mroe appropriate to send him to school.
well... when i looked into it a bit more and examined all the options i knew i wanted to homeschool him completely.
I do think that having an education which involved psychology and mental and physical development of children etc helped me in confirming my beliefs in homeschooling. Although I never faulted the way Kindergartens were / are run in Austria I dont like the idea of them here in England. Every single one I have looked at has been kind of sad looking. Knowing how bright and warm and "gemuetlich" Kindergartens are in Austria I just couldnt bring myself to send ds to a nursery here in england.
petra_william is offline  
#28 of 37 Old 11-23-2008, 04:47 PM
 
Smirkin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Central NJ
Posts: 165
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovbeingamommy View Post
I've always considered myself as a facilitator of my students' learning. I let their interest drive the learning environment that I set up. The majority of my "facilitating" is done through differentiation (meaning that each child gets what they need, when and how they need it - with their interests always taken into account) No two children learn in the same way and this is why the concept of differentiation has been so important to me throughout my teaching career. However, I've noticed within the past 4-5 yrs the p.s. system is becoming more regimented everyday and everything is driven by those test scores

So because of this I will most likely not teach in the regular classroom again in a p.s
I agree with this very much, and I want to add to it. This idea of "differentiation" in the classroom is very much alive and well in the public school system; in fact, I would go so far as to argue that a teacher or administrator who is doing her/his job would in my view have many of the same goals for students as a homeschooling parent would. (The exception to this would be unschoolers of course, and those who homeschool for religious purposes.)

This idea that public school teachers have to "unlearn" in order to homeschool doesn't quite take with me. I am debating homeschooling my own child (not born yet), and the main reason this appeals to me is because I will finally get an opportunity to truly and simply teach. To me, this is the problem with public school - the teachers just want to teach, and the system adds in so many supplementals to teaching that we teachers are left exhausted, frustrated, and with very little time or energy left to do what it is we are supposed to be there for.

Every single education class I took, along with every single professional development workshop I have been required to participate in by my school district (those inservice days) has focused completely on how to BREAK OUT of what is seen as traditional and outdated modes of teaching. Today's teachers are constantly barraged with the idea that a child sitting in a desk repeating what the teacher said and circling the "right answer" on the test is not learning. We are told over and over again that learning, and especially assessment, must be authentic and individualized. We are taught multiple strategies for doing this. That is what our job is supposed to be, and those of us (and there are a lot of us) who know and practice this fully support the idea of homeschooling because we realize that it is an environment perfectly designed for exactly what we are trying to do within the public school system. We look at homeschooling parents with envy because they get to do what we want to be able to do, what we were taught to do, and what we know is right.

Just like in any profession, there are teachers out there who still conform to the "old ways", and the example by a previous poster about the museum "quizzer" is a perfect example of this type of old-school (ha - no pun intended) view of teaching in which the student is expected to be a simple receptacle for information - I tell it you, you tell it back to me, therefore you have learned. This is not authentic learning or authentic assessment, and every teacher I know would agree with me. In a perfect world, if that was my "lesson," I would have students walk around the gallery, immerse themselves, maybe jot down names of pieces they particularly liked just to remember them for later, and enjoy just looking and thinking. When we returned to the classroom, I would have students create a response of their own choosing to what they saw in the museum. I would give them options (a poem, a sketch, a literal description, find info about an artist you liked, add to or think of another angle on one of the pieces you saw, make a list of questions to ask the artist, paint your own picture, etc.) but these would only be to help give them ideas - they would be able to respond in any way they saw fit. This would not be an assessment of "what they learned at the art museum" but more a mark of the occasion, and a way to gather and focus some of their earlier reflection in a way that might generate even more meaning for them individually. This to me would be a perfect lesson, and unless I'm wrong in my views of homeschooling, I think a lot of homeschooling parents could see themselves doing a "lesson" such as this.

I have tried to do authentic lessons like this in the public school system, and my main obstacles have been parents and politicians. Parents who demand a grade, and who write me nasty emails demanding to know why their child is "wasting his time with markers instead of learning," and politicians who see nothing but numbers and create programs like NCLB which effectively suffocate authenticity and individualization in favor of the almighty test score, which is right back to the child-as-receptacle view that teachers and schools have been struggling to get away from.

So I give this looooooong post to argue that to me, it is actually those who are less educated and experienced in teaching (i.e., the aforementioned parents and politicians) who push public schools to be less authentic and less individualized. Obviously when I say "parents" I mean those who buy into the traditional ways of school, the ones they recognize from their own childhoods. In my experience, the amount of parents out there who view school as a place to "sit in your seat and repeat what the teacher said" far, far outnumbers the amount of teachers who believe this.

I think those who homeschool would make great public school teachers, and I think those who are teachers would make great homeschoolers. But I don't think most of the certified teachers I have worked with would necessarily have anything to "unlearn."

Now there is the fact that I have not homeschooled. I did, however, share my hypothetical museum lesson, which is the kind of activity I would see myself doing as a homeschooler, so perhaps you can judge my understanding of homeschooling from that example.

Thanks to whoever made it to the end of this post! I am obviously very interested in this topic, and would really enjoy continuing this conversation.
Smirkin is offline  
#29 of 37 Old 11-23-2008, 05:05 PM
 
Lillian J's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 9,065
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smirkin View Post
In a perfect world, if that was my "lesson," I would have students walk around the gallery, immerse themselves, maybe jot down names of pieces they particularly liked just to remember them for later, and enjoy just looking and thinking. When we returned to the classroom, I would have students create a response of their own choosing to what they saw in the museum. I would give them options (a poem, a sketch, a literal description, find info about an artist you liked, add to or think of another angle on one of the pieces you saw, make a list of questions to ask the artist, paint your own picture, etc.) but these would only be to help give them ideas - they would be able to respond in any way they saw fit. This would not be an assessment of "what they learned at the art museum" but more a mark of the occasion, and a way to gather and focus some of their earlier reflection in a way that might generate even more meaning for them individually. This to me would be a perfect lesson, and unless I'm wrong in my views of homeschooling, I think a lot of homeschooling parents could see themselves doing a "lesson" such as this.
I think that's nice for a classroom approach, but a lot of us homeschoolers would not see ourselves doing such a lesson at all - we'd let the museum experience stand totally on its own the way it does for an adult. If I go to a museum, I don't go home and do any of those things for myself - I just go home - and I respected my son to also be able to get what he got and leave it at that. We'd have natural conversations the way people do during and after such a visit, but that's it. This is the kind of thing some of us are thinking about when we speak of things a teacher needs to unlearn. The comments I mentioned earlier about the docent weren't so much about her trying to get feedback that what she'd said had been learned as about her trying to keep a handle on the learning process, trying to make sure the children were actively listening and getting a lesson out of it - and those are the kinds of things I and other homeschooling friends let go of once we'd had some experience in experiencing our children as natural learners like ourselves rather than as our students needing oversight on things like that. It's a subtle or not so subtle shift, depending on your viewpoint.

I should add that I'm not saying we wouldn't bring in books, films, or other things that might be interesting extensions of things the museum trip had introduced or interest it sparked - we might - just that a lot of us would see no reason to think in terms of making a lesson of it.

Lillian

Lillian J is offline  
#30 of 37 Old 11-23-2008, 06:11 PM
 
Smirkin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Central NJ
Posts: 165
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thanks for responding Lillian - I see your point.

However, wouldn't yours be an unschooling approach? I guess I had it in my head that there were those who considered themselves "homeschoolers" and those who considered themselves "unschoolers" - and that they would each view themselves as different from the other. Am I wrong about that?

I realize labeling is annoying and restrictive, and maybe there's another place I should be asking that question because I did sort of just jump into this forum without much thought.
Smirkin is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off