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#31 of 54 Old 01-03-2009, 06:18 AM
 
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First i taught her to recognize the ABC's, and then 100 lessons. We read two lessons a day, starting with reviewing the previous day's lesson and going on to the next. There were a couple of times when she got frustrated, but we just pressed on. She's reading on a second grade level now she is on lesson 87 in 100 lessons.

I was at a complete loss how to to teach reading but with the 100 lessons it's worked better than I could have ever hoped.:

 

 

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#32 of 54 Old 01-03-2009, 10:08 AM
 
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Originally Posted by meemee View Post
yes yes mama v. true. v. true.

another reason could also be vision issues. tracking problems.
Maybe some children truly have vision issues, but it is important to know that vision therapy will not cure dyslexia. See this list from http://www.bartonreading.com/research2.html#wont :


What Won't Work

Most parents have tried one or more of the following products or treatments, and know they do NOT work for children with dyslexia.

• Hooked on Phonics or The Phonics Game
• Reading Recovery
• Vision Therapy
• Fast ForWord
• Brain Gym or other neurodevelopmental exercises
• Special glasses
• Medicine
• Special diets
• Accelerated Reader
• Most commercial learning center chains, such as Sylvan, Kuman and Score

For research proving these methods don't work, buy the Summer 2001 issue of Perspectives, from the International Dyslexia Association by calling 800-ABCD-123
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#33 of 54 Old 01-03-2009, 02:17 PM
 
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Originally Posted by meemee View Post
just a word of warning.

totally depends on the age.

just because they learn the alphabets early - say by 2 - 2 1/2 AND show signs of being ready to read - dont expect it to happen right away. something about their brain needing time to process.
I want to second (third, fourth and fifth by this point, I think ) this. My oldest daughter -almost five years old - knew her letters by 18 months. We'd be waiting at a light and I'd hear her spell out WalMart or 'couch' and turn to see a huge truck with those letters on the side of it. She was just reading the letters one by one as they were parked by us. I was sure I'd have a very early reader. She's just now (within the last two months) showing TONS of interest in not only reading, but writing. I encourage all letter play since they tie together so well.

I was sure that I was going to have very early readers. My mom had all ten of us reading by three years old. It wasn't fun, it wasn't pretty, but she got 'er done. It was very important to her. Books and the knowledge and escape you could get from them were very important in our family, so all of us children read voraciously.

When I had my daughter, one of the first books I bought was '100 Lessons'. It's still sitting on my shelf. I have let go of the need to prove I have a very intelligent child who is reading by age three and am following her lead. As I said, books are very important to me, but my husband would rather watch The Simpsons. My daughters, both of them, so far are taking after me and are constantly asking me to read books to them. There are very few things I won't put down immediately when asked to read a book, so that has encouraged their interest.

With my daughter's current interest level, she could very well be reading by age five. Or she could absorb the information she needs right now and let it sit for some months or years to process and come back to it later. I have a large window of time before I get worried about learning to read now. It's such a normal part of life to my children that it will happen and they have the opportunity to do it when they are ready.

Ramblings, ramblings.

Homesteading, unschooling mama of three.
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#34 of 54 Old 01-04-2009, 02:05 AM
 
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We use The Ordinary Parents' Guide to Teaching Reading, the Pathway Before We Read workbook and the Explode the Code workbooks. Along with lots of lots of reading together and learning words in the books by sight and sounding some out.

Midwife (CPM, LDM) and homeschooling mama to:
13yo ds   10yo dd  8yo ds and 6yo ds and 1yo ds  
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#35 of 54 Old 01-04-2009, 07:10 PM
 
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We read to them and answered questions. Pretty early on I explained that the symbols correspond to sounds, and they asked how to write their names and then (much later) other words. Questions mostly took the form of, "What does that sign say?" or "What do these letters spell?" They play video games and read comic books and graphic novels where words correspond to actions, so they were picking it up there too. It's been a very life-relevant organic process. We tried to do formal instruction (phonics-based) and prompting with our first child and it was a disaster -- he just wasn't ready and it made him extremely frustrated and angry. For a few years he'd get interested for a while and work on reading for several hours, then show no interest for the next several months. It wasn't until he was 10 that he started reading on a regular basis, and he became fluent very quickly, which is in line with a lot of what I've read about how learning happens when the child is truly ready, i.e. quickly and easily. His first book that he finished (in about three days) was Ender's Game, which is adult-level fiction. My younger son started reading this year at nine years of age (though I know that he was making connections for a long time before that.) He's currently whipping through Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone.
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#36 of 54 Old 01-04-2009, 07:37 PM
 
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It is currently a work in progress here. DS1 is 5.5.

We started with The Reading Lesson but he lost interest quickly and we dropped it for about six months. During that time he watched all of the Leapfrog DVDs. Now he is using Click n Read Phonics online and doing really well with it. I also have all the Bob Books but he doesn't want to use them yet.

DS1 March 2003DS2 Sept 2005,
and 3 , in our happy secular
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#37 of 54 Old 01-04-2009, 07:58 PM
 
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I used HOP---my son is dyslexic but-- I didn't use it completely as instructed. My son was memorizing tapes. Not looking at the words or letters. One of the issues he was having in school. He could recite pages and pages of words but couldn't point out simple words.

I didn't realize it until later testing did how I modified it was very much like Orthogillian. I had a speech teacher accidental teach me to read. Guess what her "made" up speech lessons were like?

I used Phonics Pathways. I encourage you to learn the rules so you can pass them on.

With my HOH dd It was Phonics Pathways and hop readers (I didn't have money for any other readers). And some creativity since she doesn't hear all the sounds.

My youngest learned by osmosis. LOL But she did have Explode the Code work books because she wanted workbooks.

I really hated people that told me just read they will learn. My first two didn't, wouldn't, couldn't. I had kids that wanted to read. Ask me to teach them and were frustrated things didn't go easy. My son would cry tears because he couldn't read a book.

I do think some people push reading to soon but some times waiting isn't good either. Learning signs of reading/developmental issues helps.
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#38 of 54 Old 01-04-2009, 08:29 PM
 
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Originally Posted by meemee View Post
just a word of warning.

totally depends on the age.

just because they learn the alphabets early - say by 2 - 2 1/2 AND show signs of being ready to read - dont expect it to happen right away. something about their brain needing time to process. there may be a waiting time of one to two years if not more before they read. it took my dd 4 1/2 years between knowing the alphabets and seriously reading both of which she taught herself.

seriously i would not teach reading - unless your child shows any interest. interest enough to sit down and willing to go through books. some may show interest in reading but its not really there yet. so they may throw the book down in frustration. you might be right and know they CAN do it. but dont force it.

seriously reading is like magic. once they really want to learn they can make HUGE progress in a month. its almost they understand things in superfast speed what they previously might have spent days over.

imho - children should not be taught to read unless they are hounding you - whether that is at 4, 7 or 10 years old.

in fact i think reading is one of those things that dont need to be taught. neither for that matter addition or subtraction. they just figure out the basics on their own.


IMO, kids learn to read just like they learned how to speak: by being exposed/immersed in it, and having it correctly modeled for them. When their *brains* are ready biologically, it happens (assuming they are exposed to it and there are no development issues). There is scientific research that says when parents push reading and force kids to memorize sounds and words (which is what most extreme early readers are doing, instead of organically reading words), they are actually hurting the child's brain development and sacrificing comprehension ability down the line. Meaning: a "coached", memorization-reader might not be able to readily understand the meaning a simple paragraph when in 3rd grade.

I've since learned (through observation) that if I have to try to force or work diligently for my child to learn something, that its too soon developmentally for the brain (even if not to soon for their maturity level, personality, etc). When you see this in action, it really hits home. When I don't push things whatsoever, just expose casually and expand on what DD expresses interest in, and then it just magically occurs at some point, its amazingly easy and simply: amazing. The way it should be. Trust the brain!

Also, for anyone concerned about late reading (again, assuming there are no developmental challenges such as dyslexia and the like), take a look at some of the Waldorf threads about late readers. Might surprise you. Some of these kids don't read until age 9 or 10 but then just explode into reading coherently & cohesively, and many have the comprehension and reading ability FAR beyond their contemporaries who learned to read at ages 4-6. Fascinating!
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#39 of 54 Old 01-04-2009, 11:04 PM
 
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How do I know if my late reader is dyslexic? I'm currently using the "wait for interest" method of teaching reading, but according to some people, I'm missing the boat if he turns out to be dyslexic. Any words of wisdom?
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#40 of 54 Old 01-05-2009, 12:29 AM
 
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I wanted to throw another book in the ring-- I can't believe I forgot it! It's called "Teach a Child to Read with Children's Books".
This is what I have used with both of my older two, and we adore it. I blogged about it - http://www.hippiemommy.com/2007/07/0...ildrens-books/

We tried 100 Easy Lessons with my oldest, and found it so B-O-R-I-N-G. My second has actually enjoyed it, but we're using it as a supplement to Teach a Child to Read with Children's Books rather than as the spine of our curriculum.

-Amanda
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#41 of 54 Old 01-05-2009, 12:35 AM
 
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I read to my children. Alot.

I used the MacMillan Phonics program.

It seems to me to be a maturation point at which children can "crack" the code and begin to read. All of my children began to read at age seven. Some start earlier, others later. It seems to me that children begin to read when they ask you to read the same book over and over. That was the clue for me.

Remember in the Colfax book, Homeschooling For Excellence, the oldest child did not begin to read until he was nine, and then only when he found a subject (arrowheads) he was really interested in learning about.

"The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie, deliberate, contrived and dishonest, but the myth, persistent, persuasive and unrealistic."
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#42 of 54 Old 01-05-2009, 01:01 AM
 
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Originally Posted by alisonbr View Post
How do I know if my late reader is dyslexic? I'm currently using the "wait for interest" method of teaching reading, but according to some people, I'm missing the boat if he turns out to be dyslexic. Any words of wisdom?
This was posted earlier....
http://www.dys-add.com/symptoms.html#sum
http://school.familyeducation.com/le...ing/42204.html

My dyslexic child wasn't rhyming. He got left and right confused. He also couldn't cross the mid-line. He still doesn't have a dominate hand at 14. I hate to admit it he still have to "think"about the oder of days and months. Even though he has an excellent memory and can remorize and recite pages of information....his "rote" memorization skill is definantly less than my non-dyslexic children.

If there a family member that has dyslexia or suspected. My sister, dad, and I all dyslexic.
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#43 of 54 Old 01-05-2009, 01:12 AM
 
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True dyslexia is found in switching words as saw and was.

Dyslexia as a term for reading and learning difficulties is tossed around too much.

Some parents panic when they see their child printing and confuse the s with a z and b with a d or even g, p and q. This should resolve itself when the child learns to do handwriting or teach your child handwriting first. Unless your child has a motor problem or hand/eye coordination problem, handwriting should not be a problem for a five year old or older. Handwriting was taught first in this country up to WWII.

And, ...for the record, I still cannot tell right from left. It is considered a learning disability.

"The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie, deliberate, contrived and dishonest, but the myth, persistent, persuasive and unrealistic."
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#44 of 54 Old 01-05-2009, 11:52 PM
 
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Oldest DD (almost 7): No program. These are things we would do:
-read
-write (in front of her-- then she started wanting to do it)
-teach sounds, not letter names, but only in moderation and in context
-read
-read
-read

Middle DD (almost 4): She is not reading yet. She's started, but her emphasis is more on writing. We've done the same thing with her that we did with older DD, but with much less reading to her.

I understand the need for wanting a program, though. I would say-- no matter what, follow your child's lead, even with a program. I am not a math person, so we got a program-- RightStart. My DD does not always use it the way it is intended, however. Her penmanship leaves much to be desired, so I had her trace numbers on a short worksheet. (Don't worry, this is a minute part of the program.) Instead, she decided she was going to multiply the numbers in each row. Oh well, at least it's math!

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#45 of 54 Old 01-09-2009, 03:33 AM
 
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We've had kind of a rough road with reading. I started formal teaching a bit too early I think. At 4 my dd seemed mechanically ready. She'd learned from Starfall and leapfrog the letter sounds and she understood the concept of blending sounds to make letters BUT she was soo not emotionally ready to accept the burden of practice and repetition that so many reading programs seem to require.

Things we tried that didn't work and my dd's age when we tried:

*Hooked on phonics (too much repetition, dd got bored and frustrated by all the punctuation in the readers, and it turned out that she was not able distinguish between b,p,d when these letters were adjacent to other letters ) age - 4 1/2

*Headsprout Dd played the games successfully but could recall nothing after the lessons were complete, age 4 1/2

*Dick and Jane Readers We had some success with this but the sight word memorization really exhausted dd, age 5

* BOB books, we worked on these after completing Books 1 and 2 of Explode the Code, dd could read them but didn't like the stories. 6 yo

Things that worked:
Explode the code This was our first successful approach, these readers are designed such that kids can work work through the lessons independently. This was a huge pro for us because dd didn't like me to see her work through the learning process. 6 yo

100 Words Kids Need To Read by 1st Grade this one is working and seems effective but it requires lots of parent help to work through the lessons, which my dd doesn't appreciate. 6 yo

Dr. Fry's Instant Word Practice Book This rather homely book is quite a bit like Explode the Code in that the kids can work independently through the lessons. My dd's always so proud to show me her completed work that she did all by herself. 6 yo

Pathway Readers
These look seriously lame and old fashioned but these are first books that my dd has gotten excited about reading independently. We discovered these coincidentally when working on a Social studies unit about the Amish way of life. Since we live in a rural area, dd can really relate to characters and lifestyle and I really appreciate that the books reinforce our family's values about cooperation and participating in household chores. The link above makes it seem like these stories have a strong religious message but they actually could be used in any secular program. I started with the first grade readers but I'll from the beginning with dd2. Age 6
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#46 of 54 Old 01-09-2009, 03:35 AM
 
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And, ...for the record, I still cannot tell right from left. It is considered a learning disability.
Do you have vision problems in one of your eyes? I can't do this either and my optometrist says it's a common trait of folks with folks who have unbalanced eyes.
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#47 of 54 Old 01-09-2009, 04:03 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I understand the need for wanting a program, though. I would say-- no matter what, follow your child's lead, even with a program.
Yes, it's true - the program is more for me I have decided against any 'program' for now. My son saw me looking at this the other night and begged me to play.

So I downloaded the free trial and he did the sample lesson and part of the first lesson. Well, for the last two days he has been obsessed with the program! So he is moving thru the levels rapidly, but I question his retention and TBH I don't know if I like the way they 'teach' reading. The word building and blends start at lesson five and they seem so advanced (he is just working on letters and sounds).

It has been a great eye opener in terms of what *I* need and what he needs.

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Originally Posted by natashaccat View Post
We've had kind of a rough road with reading. I started formal teaching a bit too early I think. At 4 my dd seemed mechanically ready. She'd learned from Starfall and leapfrog the letter sounds and she understood the concept of blending sounds to make letters BUT she was soo not emotionally ready to accept the burden of practice and repetition that so many reading programs seem to require.

Things we tried that didn't work and my dd's age when we tried:

*Hooked on phonics (too much repetition, dd got bored and frustrated by all the punctuation in the readers, and it turned out that she was not able distinguish between b,p,d when these letters were adjacent to other letters ) age - 4 1/2

*Headsprout Dd played the games successfully but could recall nothing after the lessons were complete, age 4 1/2

*Dick and Jane Readers We had some success with this but the sight word memorization really exhausted dd, age 5

* BOB books, we worked on these after completing Books 1 and 2 of Explode the Code, dd could read them but didn't like the stories. 6 yo

Things that worked:
Explode the code This was our first successful approach, these readers are designed such that kids can work work through the lessons independently. This was a huge pro for us because dd didn't like me to see her work through the learning process. 6 yo

100 Words Kids Need To Read by 1st Grade this one is working and seems effective but it requires lots of parent help to work through the lessons, which my dd doesn't appreciate. 6 yo

Dr. Fry's Instant Word Practice Book This rather homely book is quite a bit like Explode the Code in that the kids can work independently through the lessons. My dd's always so proud to show me her completed work that she did all by herself. 6 yo
*my bolded quote*
Yes, after watching my son this week learn and practice letters and sounds I question how ready he is for repetition. He has loads of time to learn to read and so right now I just want to focus on the fun games - not repetition and practice.

thanks so much for the links - I found your post very helpful!
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#48 of 54 Old 01-09-2009, 04:04 AM
 
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I'm using the starfall website and reading to them a lot.

We also have magnetic letters they play with.

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#49 of 54 Old 01-09-2009, 04:06 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I'm using the starfall website and reading to them a lot.

We also have magnetic letters they play with.
I need to look at this website more. The only thing I saw was when you clicked on a letter and it made the sound. My DS was bored. Are there games to play?
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#50 of 54 Old 01-09-2009, 09:26 AM
 
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Pathway Readers
These look seriously lame and old fashioned but these are first books that my dd has gotten excited about reading independently.
My ds also enjoyed these--at least, the 2nd grade readers. The stories often have a moral or ethical lesson, but they are not evangelical in tone. (Amish and Mennonites tend to be simple or "plain" spoken, honest, and not forceful with their faith. They let their deeds show their faith.) Someone who specializes in reading told me the readers are about a year ahead, however (2nd grade is 3rd).

ETA: You can get these at a discount (and many other HSing items as well) at Book Peddlar.com. BTW, we did not like the primer in this series--too boring.

Anything published by EPS is generally very well researched, no frills, and good, also. They teach all the sounds that certain letters make (e.g., U makes three basic sounds, as in the words cute, cut, and put). So unlike most phonics programs, their materials are complete, cover spelling and phonics rules comprehensively, and are thus less confusing to kids.

At least one of my children seemed ready to read at one point then experienced a period of stasis, after which she just exploded in her development and reading ability. It seems not to be slow and steady for many kids, but more like jumps and starts.
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#51 of 54 Old 01-09-2009, 09:51 AM
 
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I have had INCREDIBLE success teaching my LO to read that I just had to share it with you, she is only 3.5 and this morning she was reading this sentence:

'the bug on the nut on the bun in the tin'

She has only began 'proper' reading about 8 weeks ago.

So this is how I did it:

From about three years old (Of course you can start this anytime) she learnt her sounds phonetically with these amazing books:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Finger-Phoni...1504573&sr=8-1

They are beautiful books and my DD adores them. These books went hand in hand with the matching jingle CD to help them learn there sounds. Great to listen to in the home on car trips etc:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Jolly-Songs-...ref=pd_sim_b_3

This really cemented her learning of her sounds and again she had so much fun with the songs, she knows all of them and will often sing them simply for the pure pleasure of it. This took her about 6 months but I have heard the learning can be alot quicker than that! So after she knew most of her sounds she was ready to move on to these high quality decodable books:

http://www.jellyandbean.co.uk/

These books are seriously incredible, I am a Primary school Teacher and this is the best reading scheme I have seen IMO. Basically your child will be able to work out what each word says through phonics (the sounds) and the books also contain 100 high frequency words which cannot be read via phonics. The web site may look a little confusing but basically to give your child an amazing start you would only need to buy 'The A series' and 'The B series' which are 20 books in all. There are way more you can buy, and I will be in the future b/c I am amazed by what this reading scheme has done for my DD.

Hope this helps.

A UK Waldorf blogging mama!
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#52 of 54 Old 01-09-2009, 10:01 AM
 
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I don't think I am going to follow a program per se - more so I want a program for me so that I understand what comes next. I am already running into 'difficulties' when explaining some letter sounds b/c I don't 'know' the rules (or how to explain them).

Just read what you had written here and wanted to add, that even though I am teacher ( well was, I am a SAHM now) I was confused about the best way to teach my LO to read, I think it is such an amazing gift you can give to your LO that I wanted to do it to the best of my ability. I wanted a scheme to 'hold my hand' LOL and explain everything to me, the links I posted will do just that and on the Jelly and Bean website there are teacher/parent tips with details about EACH book that you do with your child (They just point a few simple things out about how to explain stuff to your child and what they might get stuck on in the book) So I don't feel alone now, and she has learnt to read sentences in 8 weeks and that is with 5 minutes reading together a day on the scheme. She literally does one or two sentence and then I will read her stories.

A UK Waldorf blogging mama!
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#53 of 54 Old 01-09-2009, 12:38 PM - Thread Starter
 
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mamaUK - they look great - thanks

I am going to see if I can find them in the US or Canada.
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#54 of 54 Old 01-09-2009, 03:31 PM
 
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Just had a look and the Jelly and Bean website and it looks like they definately ship internationally. You should be able to find the jolly phonics books on amazon.com. Let me know if you decide to get any or if you have any questions!

A UK Waldorf blogging mama!
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