Average length of homeschooling? - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
Old 01-18-2004, 10:46 PM - Thread Starter
 
Fieryfly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: N. CA
Posts: 727
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
At a homeschool conference that I attended this past summer, one of the speakers mentioned that on average a family will homeschool for 2-3 years. It really surprised me when I first heard it, but now it is starting to make sense.

From your experience what do you think the average length of homeschooling may be?
Do you think there would be a difference in the length of time in families who homeschool from the start than those who homeschool after their kids have been in school?
Maybe there is a difference in how a family homeschooled(school-at-home vs relaxed)?
Or perhaps its just too hard for some families to have a parent at home to homeschool?

In my experience, the families that I have known that return to school have usually homeschooled for 3-5 years. Middle school seems to be the time when the kids go back to school due to wanting to be with friends, or parents wanting the upper level academics.

Any thoughts?
Fieryfly is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 01-19-2004, 12:09 AM
Dar
 
Dar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: St. Louis, MO
Posts: 11,249
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I would think school-at-homers would be more likely to school for a shorter period, while unschoolers are generally in it for the long haul. All of Rain's unschooling friends have been at it at least 5 years, most have never been to school, and they're 10-15 yrs old now (unless you count community college classes).

There is a school-at-home homeschooling mom with three boys in our big local group, two who are maybe 12 and 14 and a 3 yr old, and she's already said that the 3 yr old will go to school because homeschooling is too much work. To me, it doesn't seem like work at all... school seems like work!

I also think people who start out hsing are more likely to do it for longer periods, because it's a chosen path, not a reaction to an unsatisfactory school experience.

Dar

 
fambedsingle1.gifSingle mom to Rain (1/93) , grad student, and world traveler earth.gif


  

Dar is offline  
Old 01-19-2004, 04:54 PM
 
TiredX2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: it appears to be a handbasket
Posts: 20,029
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm guessing that the "average" is really thrown off by what you consider homeschooling. It seems to be quite popular, currently, to say you are homeschooling for preschool & a lot of DDs friends will probably homeschool kinder but then go to 1st grade at public school (our school district has "choice" schools beginning at 1st grade). IF all these people are identifying as homeschoolers, then you are really going to pull the average down. I'd be interested in a median and mode

Kay

 

 

TiredX2 is offline  
Old 01-19-2004, 04:57 PM
 
momto l&a's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Idaho
Posts: 13,100
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
From the hs'ers I know and from having been hs'ed myself I say about 10-12 years for our area.
momto l&a is offline  
Old 01-19-2004, 05:40 PM
 
lilyka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Sioux Falls, SD
Posts: 17,896
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
I have been homeschooling for three years and am beginning to see people with children dds age dropping like flies.

One got a divorce (unschooling) (4th, 1st, preschool)

Ones dd is way ahead of the curve (2nd grader working on a middle shcool level) and her son is on the low side of the curve) and she had no idea how ot homeschool him so she sent him to preschool to more or less get rid of him, dd complained because she has been pining away for school so her mom sent her : She did mostely school at home (3rd, preschool)

one had child #8 and sent her oldest to school only to be seduced by the ease of letting someone else parent and now sends off all of her kids 3 and up. (pre- 12, school at home)


I think the way and the reasons you homeschool have a lot to do with how long you homeschool. I do think school at homers are much more likely to accept public school because that is what they were emulating anyway. Where as people who seek different ways to learn and different time tables, thier children probably wouldn't adjust as well and the parents wouldn't be as likely to accept a way of learning that they considered a step down.

I can see 3-4 years as a likely average. Mom send her baby to kindergarten, by the end of the year she relizes she doesn't like it so much and starts thinking about homeschooling. By the end of 1s tgrade she has convinced her husband and ordered the fancy cirriculum. She home schools 2, 3, 4th grades. By 5th grade this is wearing thin on her nerves, her money is running out, all of the children are school aged and it makes sence to start Sally in middle schools because "kids that age need peer relationships more than they did in elementry school." or they start right from the beginning homeschooling for religous reasons and by 3rd or 4th grade they think they children are old enough to hold thier own morally and are less impresionable etc. . . .

The truest answer to violence is love. The truest answer to death is life. The only prevention for violence is for the heart to have no violence within it.  We cannot prevent evil through any system devised by mankind. But we can grapple with evil and defeat it, but only with love—real love.

lilyka is offline  
Old 01-19-2004, 11:21 PM
 
anythingelse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 1,879
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
interesting, the people I know well that hs have hsed for years and will always hs -- I'm with momto l&a

I am curious about where the speaker got his stats

I have met more people recently that hsed for about 3 semesters, pulled a child out at half yr mark and then hsed the next yr and then put them back in school, not because they wanted to but because of it being like free daycare - or the child had a behavioral problem the parent could no longer deal with on their own or resolve and that was about enough time for the parents to decide back to ps.
anythingelse is offline  
Old 01-20-2004, 12:48 AM
 
Marsupialmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: St. Louis MO
Posts: 9,039
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I agree I would like to know were and how the stat’s were obtained.

How many of the old, long term homeschoolers are still in hiding?

Does it take into account the new people entering homeschooling just in there first few years?

Does it include people that stepped out of the school district because of temporary illnesses, pregnancy, suspensions, and/or expulsions?
Marsupialmom is offline  
Old 01-20-2004, 12:52 AM
 
mythreebees's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 374
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I don't know how that parameter could be measured. For one thing how do you define the "average" homeschooling family? Is there really such a thing? We've been homeschooling for 7 years now but we did institutional school for 4 years before that. I've certainly seen families come and go and come again because they've all made school choices (for either home or public or private) for their own personal reasons.

It's been interesting to me over the years to hear the differing numbers given for the total of homeschoolers nationally. There is usually a wide variety of "estimates." This is another reason that it seems improbable to me that you could get an accurate "average" on this.
mythreebees is offline  
Old 01-20-2004, 11:30 AM
 
SagMom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Posts: 4,939
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally posted by Dar

I also think people who start out hsing are more likely to do it for longer periods, because it's a chosen path, not a reaction to an unsatisfactory school experience.

Dar
Oh, I don't know. Sometimes a reaction to an unsatisfactory school experience is the trigger for questioning the status quo. Many of us started out with ps because we were ignorant of the choices available. (Kind of like moms who have their first babies at hospitals and then all the rest at home, yk?)

I generally agree with you, that those with a philosophical reason behind their homeschooling will probably hs longer than those who believe in schools, just not their particular school at that particular time. But then...people sometimes send their kids back to school due to hardships, or the kids themselves want to go back...I don't know...it's probably a way to individual thing for any "averages" to be meaningful. And, like "mythreebees" said--we don't even know how many homeschoolers there are!

I'd love to know where those stats came from.

Single Mom to 3 (12, 17 & 21)  luxlove.gif and dog2.gif.

SagMom is offline  
Old 01-20-2004, 01:29 PM
 
barbara's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 2,027
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
In my experinece, it is about 50/50. I see lots of families that "try" homeschooling and decide it either isn't for them or they move on to a different lifestyle.

We have been unschooling since the 80's and I'm always sad to hear it when people that I've known for years are now putting their kids in school, or using the ever popular School of Tomorrow computer classes. Some of these people have been relaxed homeschoolers for years and then suddenly feel they aren't doing a good enough job. I guess they felt it was easier to follow a self-directed learning model when the kids were young.

I have found few true unschoolers that put their kids in school, but I do have one friend that let her children choose when they got highschool age. Her ds went for a year and then came back home until college. Her oldest dd choose to go to highschool for the excellent art program and continued for 4 years, going on to college and earning a degree in photo journalism. Her next dd choose to continue learning at home, and we shall see what the younger ones do. This worked well for her family, but I see it as different then the family who suddenly decides to put all the kids in school.
barbara is offline  
Old 01-20-2004, 01:53 PM
 
Mom4tot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Pemberley
Posts: 15,236
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally posted by Vanna's Mom
interesting, the people I know well that hs have hsed for years and will always hs -- I'm with momto l&a

I am curious about where the speaker got his stats

I have met more people recently that hsed for about 3 semesters, pulled a child out at half yr mark and then hsed the next yr and then put them back in school, not because they wanted to but because of it being like free daycare - or the child had a behavioral problem the parent could no longer deal with on their own or resolve and that was about enough time for the parents to decide back to ps.
I have seen this too. Many of the famillies I see sending the kids BACK to school, after a brief period of homeschooling do so for behavioral or family issues (ie. new baby, too many young ones at home). One exception is a well- loved family in our group, radical unschoolers, who chose a small parochial school for their two boys...1st and 4th grades. We miss them and it surprised us all. They said it was to give the mom some time to herelf and allow the boys to "differentiate"...the mom was in counseling at the time.
We have always homeschooled, yet I still get questions re: when I will send ds, 3, to preschool ..."just to play". Cracks me up!

~Joan, Happy mom to 2 beautiful kiddos, one new puppy and 2 lovely felines
Mom4tot is offline  
Old 01-21-2004, 06:32 PM - Thread Starter
 
Fieryfly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: N. CA
Posts: 727
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
The speaker that I heard this from works for one of the national homeschooling organizations, and it was at a talk about support groups. It was just something she briefly mentioned, and I doubt that it was according to any type of research other than anecdotal.

It is interesting to see how it would be hard to see any type of trend since homeschooling is just a label for so many different types of family educational situations. I, myself, can only base my opinion on the families I know in our homeschool group or come into contact with.

This is our 4th year with our homeschool group, and it is very interesting to see families come and go, along with who continues to stick around after all these years.
Fieryfly is offline  
Old 01-22-2004, 05:15 PM
 
eilonwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Lost
Posts: 15,067
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I went to college with a a guy who had been homeschooled. He was the third of 7 or 8 children, 2.5 years apart on average. The kids had been in public and private schools until the oldest was (I believe) getting ready to enter junior high school. In other words, the younger three or four children never had any public schooling at all, but the older kids had had some. My friend had been pulled out after second or third grade. He said that because it was not legal, they never discussed it outside of the house. The family was sort of 'in hiding' in plain sight, even later on when it was definately legal to homeschool, because of those early days.

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
eilonwy is offline  
 
User Tag List

Thread Tools


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off