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#1 of 25 Old 10-13-2009, 03:46 PM - Thread Starter
 
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My husband and I both work fulltime out of the home. The nature of our jobs does not allow us to be self employed or work from home for another 3 to 5 years. We are away from him 10 hours/day during the week

Under those conditions is it feasible to homeschool our son and have him cared for by a nanny?

Has anyone done this and did it work?

My main reason for wanting to homeschool is that the public schools in my area are very crowded and the teachers apathetic. Even if that were not the case the requirements of the school district amount to a lot of box ticking instead of ensuring that learning takes place.

The private schools try to follow the public school format except for one which is wildly expensive.
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#2 of 25 Old 10-13-2009, 03:56 PM
 
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We may be asking the same question soon. In our case I still want to provide instuction; I just don't want to have to send my child to school simply b/c her dad got a job and we need a nanny.
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#3 of 25 Old 10-13-2009, 04:29 PM
 
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You either get a housekeeper who is willing to do childcare and have a tutor come in some hours of the day (depending on the child ... a couple of hours a day would probably suffice). Or you hire a governess. The situation is extremely traditional ... much more so in many ways than full day school. Or rather than have a tutor come in, you have the housekeeper transport your child to a group study environment, such as to a homeschool mother's home who has agreed to add him to your brood, and to his home school enrichment classes.

Or depending on how old he is -- you may find that the amount of time you'd spend in your parental duties to a school + homework is more than sufficient to complete all his learning goals for the year. In which case the nanny or housekeeper would just need to drive him to the enrichment classes you select and keep him off of the TV (for example).
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#4 of 25 Old 10-13-2009, 04:31 PM
 
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No one says that school has to happen between 9 and 3, Monday through Friday. School can certainly happen after 6:00 in the evening or on the weekends. A nanny could fill in with field trips during the day. I think in most states it does say that the "teacher" must be either a parent or state certified. So I would not trust just anyone to "school" my child. But facilitating field trips would be great.

I think there was another thread about this recently.

Kathi

:::Mom to 5 adult children and 8 year old, Dakota "Why do they call it homeschool, we're never at home?"
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#5 of 25 Old 10-13-2009, 04:33 PM
 
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Well, I know for a fact that you can do this if you go with one of the state-funded virtual academies. When we applied for our 2 oldest to do OHVA (k12 curriculum) there was a place for parents' information and then a spot for the learning coach information. I know one lady locally who uses OHVA also and her mother is the childrens' learning coach so that she can work FT (single parent situation) The downside is that you have to do all the state-mandated testing if you aren't one who likes that stuff. (for us it wasn't an issue, we had decided to do the standardized testing route for our reporting option instead of a teacher assessment/ portfolio review)

I don't know if that option would interest you though, I know a lot of hs'ers tend to shy away from the public virtual schools like we use because it still IS a public school, just in your home. (for us it isn't as invasive as we expected, I talk to the teacher on the phone once a month and I keep track of lessons we do and the time we spend on all lessons, not much else beyond that)

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Melissa 4/03, Lydia 5/04, Kimberly 1/06, and Jordan 9/07

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#6 of 25 Old 10-13-2009, 06:50 PM
 
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I think in most states it does say that the "teacher" must be either a parent or state certified.
Oh, no, I wouldn't think that. In my state if you are employing a tutor for some of your child's 4.5 hour a day, 180 day school year, the tutor needs to have a high school diploma or a GED. That's our law. Think about a private school: they are not restricted to certified teachers.
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#7 of 25 Old 10-13-2009, 06:59 PM
 
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I second the K12 virtual academy option. The curriculum is so user-friendly that any literate person with the level of patience you'd normally require in a nanny anyhow can act as learning coach for the first few years. And non-parents are definitely allowed to act as the learning coach.
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#8 of 25 Old 10-13-2009, 07:22 PM
 
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It's possible We both work FT and we homeschool two children right now. Honestly, it's just a matter of finding a schedule that works and being open-minded about WHEN school occurs. We ustilize daycare/kidsitter instead of a nanny, but same idea.

For us, as an example, school is Saturday-Wednesday with Monday and Wednesday being more of a half-school day each and Thursday/Friday is the weekend from school. We spend about 3 hours a day on Saturday, Sunday and Tuesday and 1.5 hours on Monday and Wednesday.

WOHM to DS11 and DD9, both T1Ds

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#9 of 25 Old 10-13-2009, 07:43 PM
 
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Yes, our school week includes the weekends as well.
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#10 of 25 Old 10-13-2009, 09:57 PM
 
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I used to homeschool children that weren't my own, and I've met several other people who were in the same situation (at least one for very famous parents!).

I think the think that you would really have to take into account is that you would be looking for an educated nanny who is very fluent in English, and depending on your area that can cost a considerable amount of money.

I have seen it work very well, though. I think the important thing is to be on the same page with the nanny, and for there to be A LOT of communication, while allowing the nanny to lead as she finds appropriate. One of the major perks of homeschooling is that the school day never ends, so you want there to be a smooth transition between caretakers (meaning, the nanny and you guys). I used to write a note to the parents every day about what we did.

If you have any questions, you can PM me.

Trying to live a simple life in a messy house in a complicated world with : DH, DD (b. 07/07), DS (b. 02/09), and DD (b. 10/10)
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#11 of 25 Old 10-13-2009, 10:51 PM
 
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We have one kid in our group who is hs'd by her nanny. The child is older, at least 13, and it seems to work for her.

The nanny is a former elementary school teacher. As far as I know the job is full time and the nanny is completely in charge of the hsing. The mother picks out the curriculum (I believe they use K12 or another all in one curriculum) and gets updates, but the nanny does all of the execution, as well as taking the child on field trips and get togethers with our group.

If dh and I both worked full-time and we had the money to pay someone, I'd do it. It's not ideal for me, personally, but I think it's a great option for others.
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#12 of 25 Old 10-14-2009, 02:18 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FraggleLover View Post
My husband and I both work fulltime out of the home. The nature of our jobs does not allow us to be self employed or work from home for another 3 to 5 years. We are away from him 10 hours/day during the week

Under those conditions is it feasible to homeschool our son and have him cared for by a nanny?

Has anyone done this and did it work?
I know a family who is homeschooling their children and have actually hired a teacher (well, three - they have a lot of $$$) to teach them. A nanny could also work, if she was really motivated. But you might try to find someone who is also very interested in teaching, KWIM? It could be a person who is perhaps going to school PT, getting an elementary education degree, who would view this as a great opportunity to "practice" what she is learning on an actual child.
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#13 of 25 Old 10-14-2009, 03:24 AM
 
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There is a family in our homeschooling group who has their nanny bring their dd to most functions during the day. I know they have various tutors that also come to their house. (Her dd is only 4, but I guess they wanted to get started early.)
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#14 of 25 Old 10-14-2009, 08:48 AM - Thread Starter
 
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DS is only a baby now. He shares a nanny with a little girl at her house. When she starts part time pre-school we will have to find another solution. So I'll be looking for a nanny who is willing to assist with the activities we choose for him.
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#15 of 25 Old 10-14-2009, 10:03 AM
 
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But you are saying in 3-5 years you will be more flexible in where you work? That would be about the time you'd start home schooling. Before that he needs quality care and probably the most educational thing you can do is pick a target second language already and get a nanny who will immerse him. Second is exposure to music. Third is probably reading to him in English, or having books on tape, that are as advanced in vocabulary as he can enjoy.

Also, home schooling for academics in the early elementary years is knocked out really quickly one on one and the bulk of home schooling effort in my home is supervising musical instruument practice, driving to performance arts and sports, and maintaining all the instruments and gear.
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#16 of 25 Old 10-14-2009, 10:33 AM
 
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Start by looking into the laws for your state. As another poster mentioned, in some states homeschooling law specifies the parent or legal guardian must be the one providing instruction. However, if that's the case in your state, I imagine there are ways to get around this, and there must be some provision for professional tutoring as well (ie. for child actors, dancers, etc.).
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#17 of 25 Old 10-14-2009, 01:14 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I am not in the states.

The laws regarding homeschooling here are that the education must be "acceptable to the minister"

Most homeschoolers here are from overseas and not planning to stay here permanently. So the are tolerated by the Ministry of Education. I only know of 2 local families who homeschool and it seems the officials were not quite sure what to do with them. There are not enough homeschoolers to require an official stance.

All of this to say I am not worried about official requirements.

I want feel comfortable in interviewing a nanny (and we plan to have more children) to explain that part of her duties will be to supervise them in part of their studies/activities and that my children will not be disadvantaged this way.

The answer I've gotten so far is yes, I can do this.
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#18 of 25 Old 10-14-2009, 02:38 PM
 
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I live next to a mostly lower income rust-belt type city with a rather nasty school system. I've noticed that there are quite a few families with just one parent (who works) or both parents have to work full time that have hired a nanny/sitter for their kids during traditional work hours. The kids do most of their book work type schooling with their parents in the evening hours or on weekends, and then the Nanny seems to be the one taking them to activities during the day hours, like the homeschool library club and the YMCA program.

So I do think it's doable if you are open to other arrangements. I think the one woman I talked to said that the kids aren't allowed to watch junky-tv or play video games during the daytime while with the nanny, but can read/play/do creative type crafting. You said you are not in the States and so I don't know what sort of oppertunities you might have for the kids during the day, but perhaps you could find things with some digging? Then the nanny could do certain things with the kids and some could be reserved for the parents. And you could hire the nanny with the understanding that this is part of the responsibility (ie- make sure kid X reads this book, maybe you could have workboxes set up ahead of time and kid X has to complete something from it.) Might also make the job more interesting for the nanny as well, especially if you have someone who perhaps thought of education as a career at one point or something.

I do think it's doable with a bit of thinking.

nature and art loving homeschooling mom to a half-dozen little treasures.
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#19 of 25 Old 10-14-2009, 08:17 PM
 
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The answer I've gotten so far is yes, I can do this.
Absolutely!
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#20 of 25 Old 10-21-2009, 03:26 PM
 
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I actually read an article recently that talked about how the trend lately (with hiring Nannies) is parents that are looking for Nannies are requiring that they are able to homeschool the children.

I'll try to find the article and post the link.

loveeyes.gif Loving homeschoolin' mama to CherryPie modifiedartist.gif and KiwiBoy eat.gif::: wife-y to my high school sweetheart partners.gif
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#21 of 25 Old 10-21-2009, 03:33 PM
 
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Here it is:

The Modern Nanny Must Be Able to Homeschool

loveeyes.gif Loving homeschoolin' mama to CherryPie modifiedartist.gif and KiwiBoy eat.gif::: wife-y to my high school sweetheart partners.gif
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#22 of 25 Old 10-21-2009, 06:07 PM
 
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There are a lot of nannies, myself included, who would jump at this chance. and any nanny worth her salt should be already doing enough with PreK kids to be doing HS preschool. I always did, and all my kids were way ahead when they went to preK. I should think you will have no trouble finding someone, I would suggest not hiring someone just starting out, but someone with some experience, and that you are very clear about what you want them to do, and make sure that they are willing to do it. I hope it all works out for you!
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#23 of 25 Old 07-07-2012, 07:58 PM
 
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do you know of any websites that list such services?  My email is [email protected]

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#24 of 25 Old 07-09-2012, 12:22 PM
 
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I want to start by saying anything is possible and I'm not discouraging you but here are a few of my random thoughts ... 

 

I don't think your situation should matter much until your child is school aged. A lot of children go to daycares, babysitters or stay with grandparents during those first five years or so with no "schooling" at all. It's fine and some would say preferable for children that age to just play without a lot of formal academics.

 

For later on ... 

Is there any way you can work alternate shifts at least part of the time with your dh so one of you can be with your child for more of the day? 

It is recommended that children up to age twelve, get between 10 and 11 hours of sleep every night. Accounting for that, you are left with fourteen hours your child is awake. Your child may be different but I don't know any kids who can do "work" the first hour or last hour of the day. That leaves twelve hours. If you are gone ten of those twelve hours that leaves you with two hours a day you can do schooling or really anything else with your child. 

This is to say the responsibility for homeschooling will definitely fall on the nanny ... 

A nanny that more than likely will cost a fortune. In my area it is waaaaaay more to pay for a private nanny than an elite private school. Anywhere/anyone that is not a drop off center with multiple kids is very pricy. If you want someone who will come to your home without watching any other children, who will spend the day teaching and bringing your child to activities - you are going to have to pay the big bucks. 


mama to three little ladies
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#25 of 25 Old 07-09-2012, 03:04 PM
 
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I have a few thoughts on this too- first, let me start off by saying good for you and your husband for trying to figure out a way to make this work for your family! I think that is really cool smile.gif I love discussions like this because homeschooling our children means SO much to DH and me, and i wish it were an option for every single family.

I strongly agree with the pp who listed some realistic considerations. Children really DO need 11-12 hours per night of quality sleep to really focus well on learning. I thought my children would require less as they grew, but that isn't the case here. Now that they are no longer napping, and they are so active, they need their rest more than ever, and my oldest is almost 9.

My boys have always been homeschooled, but there have been instances when my oldest really wanted to go to school. The only reason was so he could be with friends. We did not send him, but I did step up his social activities during the day. I also point out to him that he is not inside doing homework while the neighborhood kids are home from school playing, and that he never has school work over the weekends, or has to go to tutoring, like many of his public school friends. This is a BIG consideration for him, and the main reason he now embraces homeschooling. He thinks it is awful that some of his friends have to stay inside and do school work over the weekends or late afternoon when he can be outside playing.

So, my point is I don't know if you are in a neighborhood with other schooled kids, but the option of homeschooling in the evenings and weekends would be torture for my son. It would not work for him at all.

And, like the pp said, hiring a nanny all day during the week will likely cost more than an alternative, independent private school (Waldorf, democratic, community learning, all come to mind here...have you explored private school options that offer an interesting, non-standardized testing form of education)?

One last thought...if you do decide to go the nanny route, have you considered hiring someone who is a native speaker of a different language? Personally, that would be a big benefit to me. I currently pay for my children to take Spanish homeschool classes with a native speaker but since it is only 1x per week, it is slow going and I don't expect my children to become fluent. Many schools now offer language immersion programs where children spend much of the day learning in a foreign language. I think that would be awesome! Personally, I would go for that and consider it far more valuable as a homeschooler than hiring a nanny with a teaching degree. Credential programs focus on teaching a large mass of children using standardized methods...not as useful to me as someone who could offer my two children individualized, creative instruction geared towards their own interests, and also not as useful to me as someone who could expose my children all day to a foreign language naturally.

Just my two cents!!
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