k12/Virtual Academy Winter 2009 - Page 5 - Mothering Forums
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Learning at Home and Beyond > k12/Virtual Academy Winter 2009
zacharysmom's Avatar zacharysmom 01:35 AM 12-18-2009
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ETA:
So, I'm gathering that if you've been given school work/materials for a grade ahead, and it's not completed by the end of the school year, you can continue to access k12 online all summer and keep working on those materials?! I had assumed that unless there was a summer school option that people were signed up for, it wouldn't work that way ....[/QUOTE]

yes that is exactly how it worked for us we just finished last years history you can contine to work we cjppse nopt to but that was our choice.

GinaRae's Avatar GinaRae 06:57 PM 12-18-2009
I'm going to have him keep working on Literature and LA during the break, but that's it. Aside from memorizing multipication tables, that is. We're caught up or ahead in everything, so no rush. But I want to finish Lit/LA/Spelling so the teacher can order 4th grade in.

On that note, If we do happen to finish 3rd grade math, history or science, are those also things she can order in?

And again, on that vein, what happens if he's always ahead and we decide to put him back in school? My hubs is adamant he has to go to high school, but we've also talked about 7th grade. Is he going to be too far ahead and have issues?
eilonwy's Avatar eilonwy 07:25 PM 12-18-2009
Quote:
Originally Posted by GinaRae View Post
And again, on that vein, what happens if he's always ahead and we decide to put him back in school? My hubs is adamant he has to go to high school, but we've also talked about 7th grade. Is he going to be too far ahead and have issues?
In the event that I have to enroll Bean in a traditional school for some reason, I'll be advocating for a skip to his current working level. I have no intention of enrolling him in any school that refuses to make that accommodation for him.
elanorh's Avatar elanorh 08:00 PM 12-18-2009
DH and I have worried about this issue ourselves too .... I'm not a big fan of 'moving' kids into a different grade level because I don't think emotional maturity always matches intellectual capacity. Working on college campuses, I encountered several students who were delightful people, but were in college full-time at 16 years of age, and there was a maturity gap that caused struggles for them.

That said -- I think whether Ina was in k12 or not, she'd probably quickly find herself on a different 'track' at school. I think it can be harmful for kids to not be allowed/encouraged to work at the levels they're capable of -- making a kid who's performing at 8th grade level for reading, mope through 5th grade level reading/spelling, is awful (BTDT) and could easily be a recipe for disaster if the child becomes bored and quits paying attention at school and acting out instead, etc.

If the school system there is large enough to accommodate that, that might solve it. When dh was in high school, he was taking most of his classes at the local community college his junior and senior year (some classes at the high school, but many at the college). His social milieu was still with his classmates, though.

I think even if we homeschool all the way through, and Ina ends up several years 'ahead' then we will have her take courses at the local community college and live at home until she would have 'normally' gone to college, age-wise, before sending her off. Otherwise, if we come to a point where we transition her to public school, then we'll definitely work to make sure she's still being challenged there.

BTW, I met a k12 high school teacher at a k12 meeting a few weeks ago. It sounds to me like the k12 teachers really take the lead with the coursework once they get to the high school level (not the parent). If that's the concern about wanting to have kids in school eventually....
eilonwy's Avatar eilonwy 08:12 PM 12-18-2009
Quote:
Originally Posted by elanorh View Post
DH and I have worried about this issue ourselves too .... I'm not a big fan of 'moving' kids into a different grade level because I don't think emotional maturity always matches intellectual capacity. Working on college campuses, I encountered several students who were delightful people, but were in college full-time at 16 years of age, and there was a maturity gap that caused struggles for them.
That's interesting; The least mature students I knew in college were older (at least three turned 19 during their first semester). I think it has a lot less to do with age than with parenting and personality.
eclipse's Avatar eclipse 08:16 PM 12-18-2009
Like eilonwy, there's no way I could enroll my kids (especially ds1) in a school that wouldn't accomodate him. In fact, if they get to the point where they're starting to take HS classes at k12 (and I'm not sure we would stay for HS), I would insist that CAVA promote them to HS grade level, because CAVA won't let classes taken by middle school students (even HS classes) count for HS credit (or they only count as elective credit, or something).
GinaRae's Avatar GinaRae 10:03 PM 12-18-2009
Quote:
Originally Posted by elanorh View Post
BTW, I met a k12 high school teacher at a k12 meeting a few weeks ago. It sounds to me like the k12 teachers really take the lead with the coursework once they get to the high school level (not the parent). If that's the concern about wanting to have kids in school eventually....
It's a long story about what the HS's offer, but hubs is really on board with them having a HS experience, being a part of the state's largest men's choir, etc.. I see his point, so long as going to HS isn't going to make it harder on him. I know hubs wants him in middle school (we use a charter school) and if he's in advanced math in 8th grade he can take it at the high school. Jack was a rock star personality-wise at his elementary, but middle school is HELL. He's got some fairly high intelligence but a lack of emotional maturity, he's sensitive, and he's got some sadness we're working through. It's just all up in the air right now...but I am not on board with him going to middle school yet.
elanorh's Avatar elanorh 09:38 PM 12-28-2009
We took a break from the 23rd 'til now -- the goal is to have a lighter load this week -- do Phonics, either Science or History, and Art each day (although I'm not sure we'll do that today! ).... I was going to try to blast through Math over break but we got far enough behind on Phonics with traveling to great-grandma's funeral etc., that I just need to be caught up rather than ahead in Math and waaay behind in the others stuff.

How's everyone else doing over "Break"? We officially start back the Monday after New Years (I think the 4th). We do have two days off in the month of January just randomly (well, one for MLK day , the other for a teacher inservice - I don't think we'll take both off, although MLK day might be a good day to kind of use as a "Unit Study."

I'm reading Nurture Shock right now - not homeschooling per se, but lots about child development research. Pretty interesting. They talk about the importance of talking about race with kids, since otherwise they are making assumptions and categorizing anyway so it's best to be explicit and open about it if we want our children to grow up open to diversity. (Extreme thumbnail version of the chapter I just completed).
lovinlife1219's Avatar lovinlife1219 12:10 PM 12-29-2009
A unit study on MLK sounds like a great idea. We might do that as well.

We had all last week off and don't "officially" go back until the 4th but we are doing our full load this week. Didn't see any reason to wait, all of our company is gone, DH is back to work and E was wanting to get back into lessons. Also, we are taking an extended vacation around Easter so I figured we'd make up for it now

It's going good, we are having lots of fun with science!
kittie313's Avatar kittie313 03:30 PM 12-29-2009
We took most of last week off, and then picked up again yesterday with lessons. Melissa has just shy of 16 hours to make up before we're on target again with our hours we are required, so I'm going to be getting them in this week. We won't get to 50% on all subjects by the end of the quarter next friday, but we'll at least be at 40% or more in everything if I do it right. I'm hoping that I can schedule things just right so that we can get all our materials covered by the end of March, we'll see what happens though. I'm really enjoying k12 more now since we're in a time when I need the structure, I've come to really appreciate being able to just pull activity pages and gather up what to use, and then read straight off the screen while I'm dealing with stuff here. It has been a big relief to me not to have to think about what to teach or how to do it.

And the kids are enjoying lessons too, they are getting a lot of great stuff and we're spending more time together one on one just as I was hoping we would. I can't wait until I get all 4 kids going now.
elanorh's Avatar elanorh 06:26 PM 12-29-2009
I wish our virtual teacher hadn't told us to just relax and not do school over break.

Because even with my very good intentions, I didn't do school yesterday and doubt we'll do any today (maybe an hour or so but probably not). Cousin coming over to play, friends in town from far away and it looks like they will be stopping by to visit us (ACK BAWK cleaning alert!!!!)....

So maybe I'll just pile it on bigtime a couple days this week. We'll see.... I am enjoying the break though!
mykdsmomy's Avatar mykdsmomy 07:27 PM 12-29-2009
Can anyone give me tips on how/if they use K12 curriculum differently than it is laid out?

We have been using K12 (CAVA) on and off for 4 years now and I swear I still feel like we've not found a groove. I simply am not good at sitting down a week in advance and seeing what we'll need for Science, etc. I am a sit down first thing in the morning and see what subjects the kids can do on their own today and then help them as needed with Math (usually the toughest subject around here).

Two of my kiddos are SN so they do things a little bit different anyway....but honestly I'm always overwhelmed. Has anyone found a way to simplify and yet still meet objectives and have enough samples to turn in? TIA
elanorh's Avatar elanorh 04:40 AM 12-30-2009
Well I'm on just kindergarten -- so we haven't had to do too many samples etc. I think I'm coming up on some work sample submissions in my next few math units.

BUT - my big awesome tweak has been to do Christmas music instead of the k-12 music. I read what the objectives are for the lessons; then I sort through my Christmas CDs and find songs that fit those objectives. Ina learns Christmas carols rather than the songs on k12 that I don't know, anyway. There's a slightly higher chance that I'm singing in-tune since they are songs that I know. I just started this in December, but am going to continue it for quite awhile I think. As long as Ina will let me.

I too don't usually look ahead too far for tasks. I ought to, and mean to. But our schedule is changeable enough with travel etc. that I just don't. If there's a task that I haven't prepared for and can't put together quickly, and it is integral to the lesson - then I will sometimes put the lesson off and work on some other stuff (either subsequent lessons, or sub history for science that day or whatever), until I have things prepared for it.

And, for a break update - I got two art lessons done today! But nothing else. Cousin thought it would be fun to do art with Ina. Maybe tomorrow Ina will get some science and history done (or Phonics, I'm not partial) before Cousin arrives for another playdate, and two more art lessons.
eclipse's Avatar eclipse 05:02 PM 01-04-2010
So, who else is back at work today? We meant to do more over break than we did, but my kids aren't behind, so I don't care. DS1 did finish up Science 4 over break and Science 5 is on the way. He has about 5 lessons left in history 4, which we had planned to finish over break and never made it to - so he's going to do that in place of science until Science 5 materials arrive.

The kids haven't been giving me too much trouble getting back into it today. DD and DS2 (4 yo) are sick and losing their voices, which is keeping things mellow (less yelling, less running around, more sitting quietly playing).

Does anyone else here have a first or second grader? How are they doing with writing? DD is a 1st grader (6 and a half) in second grade LA, and she's really struggling with writing and spelling. She can read amazingly well - both decoding and comprehending. Not as well as DS1 could at her age, but he's a bit of a special case when it comes to reading. Anyhow, she completely blanks out when it comes to spelling things beyond c-v-c words and stuggles a lot with handwriting (mostly word spacing, letter size, capitalization, etc) when she's not directly copying from the line above (and even then, she has a hard time getting the letters to stay a reasonable and consistent size). I admit that we're not great about handwriting practice, because she hates it so much. DS1 has gawdawful handwriting, too, but it's a different sort of gawdawful . Anyhow, I'm wondering how your 6 and seven year olds are doing with writing. I'm wondering if I'm just noticing it more because she's a year ahead in LA (and every other subject but Art), and her writing might be right on par for your average first grader. Spelling is another issue I'm not sure whether I should push. Part of me feels like it will just come with time. She feels so defeated when she can't pass the assessments - and then we have to move on because, unlike 3rd and up, 2nd grade spelling is integrated with literature. So I have to pass her on the assessments, or we'll be stuck in every other part of LA indefinitely. DS1 is an excellent speller and never even looks at any of the spelling materials - just takes the assessments. He absorbed spelling rules by osmosis during all his early reading adventures - if he had any formal spelling training, he could be one of those national spelling bee kids - so it's hard to gauge where a more average 6 year old should be.
kittie313's Avatar kittie313 05:10 PM 01-04-2010
Melissa is a 1st grader. Her spelling and writing are horrible imo, but I've always chalked it up to her dyslexia. She's in phonics and lang. arts K right now and is doing really well with that, I can't wait til we get into phonics 1 with her (hopefully by the end of March she'll be there) She spells terribly even with cvc words, and has trouble with how legible her printing is. We're working on it though, and hopefully it improves over the next few years.

So we never really took an official winter break, we still did lessons here. Melissa's a couple hours ahead now instead of being 35hrs behind (we hit a rough spot around thanksgiving) and Lydia's about 80 hours ahead LOL So I'm relaxing a bit and enjoying all this. I'm still trying to push extra science, art, and history to try and get them finished as fast as possible to order the next level of each for the kids, but that's not a big deal really since the kids love doing their lessons and seeing what they get to learn about each day. Melissa's in heaven right now with history 1, she's loving ancient history. Speaking of, I need to get to our lessons so that we can say we've gotten something done today before the toddler wakes up from her nap LOL
eilonwy's Avatar eilonwy 06:03 PM 01-04-2010
Quote:
Originally Posted by eclipse View Post
Anyhow, I'm wondering how your 6 and seven year olds are doing with writing. I'm wondering if I'm just noticing it more because she's a year ahead in LA (and every other subject but Art), and her writing might be right on par for your average first grader.
Bean's handwriting is atrocious. He's recently had an OT evaluation and will probably be receiving services by the end of the month. Yeah, you'll notice it more when they're working ahead of age/grade level, but illegible is illegible. Bean also HATES to write, in part due to perfectionism and in part because it's just so much work for him. I can't really think of a single aspect of handwriting that has any appeal to him. We actually did the practice, and he did all right with it... but if he's got to write outside of the gray boxes (which are largely abandoned at the end of the first book of HWT) he's miserable. Lined, unlined, double-ruled, triple-ruled... it really doesn't matter, he hates all of it and while he's improved he's pretty bad with all of it. His handwriting is definitely not typical of his age. His sign-in is among the least legible in his Cub Scout den, and the only child I know personally with similar handwriting is Bean's cousin, who is autistic and is currently receiving OT services because (you guessed it!) her handwriting is atrocious.

Bean also has problems with other fine-motor tasks. He can't button a pair of jeans, for example, nor can he tie his shoes or pull small zippers. He's got a lot of trouble with anything that involves a pincer grip, really. It's really a pervasive issue with him. Boobah's handwriting, by the way, is more legible at 5 than Bean's is at 7. She has a weird grip these days (I don't know where it came from, she used to hold her pencils correctly) but she rather enjoys writing and is always happy to do it. She also enjoys art (Bean can't STAND art), and loves coloring and painting (she's not huge on drawing, but give her some paint and she'll go nuts). Bella and Bear are even more inclined to write than is Boobah. Bella's taken to signing her name wherever she can manage, like a little tiny tagger. Bear is my little artist, and will spend hours with a pencil and paper drawing people, monsters, machines, and most of all circles. So yeah... the more experience I gain with my kids, the more concerned I become about Bean's handwriting and really his fine-motor skills in general.


Quote:
Spelling is another issue I'm not sure whether I should push. Part of me feels like it will just come with time. She feels so defeated when she can't pass the assessments - and then we have to move on because, unlike 3rd and up, 2nd grade spelling is integrated with literature. So I have to pass her on the assessments, or we'll be stuck in every other part of LA indefinitely. DS1 is an excellent speller and never even looks at any of the spelling materials - just takes the assessments. He absorbed spelling rules by osmosis during all his early reading adventures - if he had any formal spelling training, he could be one of those national spelling bee kids - so it's hard to gauge where a more average 6 year old should be.
Bean's also a terrible speller. He absolutely, unequivocally refused to use "invented spellings" from day one. He would write something, say, "That doesn't spell _____!" and throw the pencil across the room before accepting that "sngset" might spell "swingset" or what have you. I skipped a lot of the second grade spelling and went back to it later-- just click "skipped" instead of "completed" on the assessment so the OLS won't get stuck. Then you can go back to it later. As you know, it's easier to put those things off in third grade, where it's all separated. If I ever get my act together, I'll visit spellingcity.com or some such and find some games for Bean to play there... but I'm terribly lazy and obscenely busy, which is a bad combination for getting anything "extra" done. In any case, Bean's teachers have been very understanding of his spelling and handwriting issues. "Some people just aren't going to be great spellers," the ALP adviser told me. "So do the best you can." I think it helps everyone dealing with him remember that he is, in fact, a very small boy (which is very easy to forget when you're largely dealing with Bean on paper) and they kind of like having that reminder. Never mind that I get it every night that I suggest he might like to sleep in his own bedroom.
kittie313's Avatar kittie313 08:26 PM 01-04-2010
OK why am I irritated right now? I'm not exactly in love with k12 history at the moment, there is just a little too much religion in it. I was under the impression that k12 was a secular program.......................... At least, that's the impression that I got from OHVA when we contacted them initially last school year before enrolling. Don't get me wrong, I'm a bible-believing, old testament loving, testimony-sharing honest to goodness Christian but it just feels a little stifling to me about how much of the Old Testament we've covered so far. Melissa is reading a story bible as part of her phonics enrichment (by her own choosing, not mine) and its rather annoying lately because the last couple stories she said "hey we learned about this in history lessons mom!" after reading a story to me. Am I just being too sensitive here or is this something that others are noticing too? We prefer to keep religion and homeschool lessons separate as much as possible, and I do realize that there is a lot of historical truth to the Old Testament, but it just feels TOO much is incorporated right now. (we obviously are not homeschooling for religious reasons here)

OK gripe session over, I'm contemplating sending a K-mail to our teacher about it and see what she says.
eclipse's Avatar eclipse 09:10 PM 01-04-2010
Well, I think it's important to learn about the formation of religions and the basis of beliefs in order to understand the reasons for a lot of things happening in history. However, I think that sometimes the K12 curriculum is not as clear as they should be about the dinstinctions between what people of religions believe to have happened and what actually happened, particularly when looking and Judaism and Christianity. We just started the history of the rise of Islam in dd's 2nd grade history, and I'm finding a lot less of a need to interject "Muslims believe. . ." than I did "Christians believe. . ." and "Jews believe. . ." in the Jewish and Christian sections. There will be more Bible Stories coming up, too, in Literature. I think every year from 1st or 2nd grade on there is a lit unit about stories from the Bible. I don't have a problem with this, because it's easier to present as a story, and because as a Lit major I'm keenly aware that there's a lot of Literature in the Western World that's impossible to understand without a firm base in Biblical stories and imagery. People in my lit program who had to learn these things as they went really struggled in certain classes. Art history would be another area that biblical knowledge is important - and of course History/Political Science as well.
eclipse's Avatar eclipse 09:15 PM 01-04-2010
Rynna, Liam's handwriting is awful, too. He's great at typing, so we sort of just go with that. He could probably use OT for it, too, to be honest. His is just sort of a scrawl that's mostly illegible in a mad scientist sort of way. I would say that dd's writing is more legible than his is, TBH, and she's two and a half years younger. I know his writing isn't normal for his age, and it never has been. That's why I'm not sure what to make of dd's - I've never really seen "normal" 6 yo writing to compare it to. Hers looks sort of like what I would think of a preschooler writing, although she's been writing this way since she was three. We've seen some improvement, but it's been slow.
eilonwy's Avatar eilonwy 01:20 AM 01-05-2010
How well does she handle other fine-motor tasks?
mizmerricat's Avatar mizmerricat 05:10 PM 01-05-2010
Hi all!
My oldest is soon to be 5 and we're just starting to consider K12/VA for her.
DD has been in a wonderful preschool with a special needs inclusion program, while getting therapy (OT, PT, SLP) from the county school system.
She's very bright academically, but has hemiplegia (from a prenatal stroke), and with motor and speech delays, she needs a lot of extra attention and modifications. She's also super independent. It's a trait that serves her very well with her challenges, but she also needs lots of leeway to choose her own tasks and move at her own pace.
Her amazing preschool has given her all that. They have no more than 12 students per class, with a teacher and at least two assistant teachers at all times, and every teacher there is a gem.
Even with an IEP in place, I'm really doubting the public schools classrooms ability to do the same for her.
I've been giving our school options a lot of thought lately, and came to MDC to check out homeschool resources, and found this thread.
I'ld really love to hear more about how the virtual academy works with special needs/IEPs, etc.
I've also got a very busy, high needs toddler running around, I'm a LLL leader, and DH and I would like to have another little bundle of joy in a couple of years. How does the VA course work and schedule work for you with other little ones and generally busy lives?? I only want to do what's best for my little ones, but as an overwhelmed, sleep deprived mother, I have to admit it's been tempting to at least try kindergarten and the public school system to give myself a break.
Thanks so much for all the great info!!
elanorh's Avatar elanorh 10:52 PM 01-05-2010
Welcome!

My eldest is in K right now, and I have a very active 3 year old -- adjusting to teaching dd1 at home is a continuing challenge. There are times that I think it would be a lot easier if I were bundling dd1 off to school and just focusing on dd2 (and maybe getting some things DONE instead of treading water with housework, sewing, gardening, whatever).

That said - it has become much more manageable. We have some educational 'toys' that SJ is supposed to only use during school (FUNtastic frogs with activity cards, phonics cards, etc.) that she can play with while her sister does school, and I actually ordered the PreK Handwriting Without Tears workbook for SJ to work with during Handwriting, too. I've kind of surrendered in terms of Phonics - SJ LOVES the magnetic board and all the stuff that came in the Phonics box. So Phonics is a bit of a monkey-wrangle - I just let her play with the magnets etc. while we're doing Phonics, anymore. That's the biggest challenge for me - SJ wants to do what we're doing. And she wants her OWN attention from me. So it's a bit of a tug-of-war. I wait 'til she's napping to do science and history, most of the time, because she loves them too but can't work at that level; with art, music, and language, she just joins in on what Ina's doing (modified for abilities at times). I do suspect that she is going to be pretty much done with K before she even starts, in terms of already having picked it all up from her sister's school.

Dd1 doesn't have special needs, but I have a friend in FL who knows a family who use their k12 program for their autistic son, and rave about how wonderful the program has been for them and for him.
kittie313's Avatar kittie313 10:25 AM 01-06-2010
Hi Heather! My second girl is doing K with OHVA, and my oldest is doing 1st grade. DD1 has multiple learning disabilities while DD2 is "gifted" (by our local ps standards at least) and I've found that our school is really great to work with these things. DD1 was moved back to phonics and lang. arts K after our teacher spent 20 minutes or so in an elluminate session with her (that's an online classroom session, with a white board and a microphone and its totally interactive) and a few minutes talking to me and hearing my concerns. We found out last month that dd1 is most likely dyslexic, and she also has ADHD, auditory processing disorder, and sensory integration dysfunction (can you say FUN TIMES teaching her lol) along with being nearsighted and in glasses for that (ruled out all other visual problems already, its just standard myopia like mine) I've found it really easy to work a little slower at times and faster at other times with her whenever the need arises, like right now we've been working on money in math and in the last 2 weeks (we did school over winter break) we've not made really any progress, we are just working on it daily and practicing. We are at the third lesson now in that unit of math after 2 weeks, but I know when we get to the clock reading she'll fly through it. Same with history and science, right now we are doing lessons in both of those daily instead of just 2 lessons a week because she's really interested in the topics and can't get enough (and is retaining it well) Art we hate so we get through the lesson part as fast as possible, then she draws in her sketchbook or at the easel for a while.

And at the same time, dd2 is going through some subjects faster than scheduled (particularly math lol) and slower in others (she's struggling with phonics for some reason) The teacher has given me enrichment suggstions for her to help her slow down a bit if we want to in the areas she's flying through, and to help build her confidence where she struggles. She's not much for coloring, so she's really not too hip on the amount of coloring in the phonics and history K (don't know about science K as our VA does 1/2 day K so we get math, phonics, lang. arts, and history only for her while dd1 also has art, science, and would have music too if I hadn't gotten that switched to just attendance so she could do violin lessons instead because the music program reeks, coming from a professional classical musician here) She has motor delays though, so that explains the coloring issue. We accomodate that by putting off the coloring in a lesson to the tail end of it, then either dd1 or I will sit and color with her (meaning she does about 1/4 of the coloring while dd1 or I do the other 3/4 of it lol)

As far as working with younger siblings, well my other 2 girls are 2yo and almost 4yo (next week yay!) and I do lessons while the 2yo is napping (yes she still takes a 3 hour nap lol) with dd1 and then dd1 plays with the little sisters while I do lessons with dd2. The school says that we need to spend 3hrs a day with dd2 and 5 hours a day with dd1 on schoolwork, but in reality I can get both girls done completely in about 4 hours with bookwork so we do other stuff to fulfill our hours (like watching Myth Busters lol the kids LOVE that show) On days that we just get our routines off and don't do lessons during dd4's nap, I usually have her in my lap during that time.

And honestly, I do have my days when I think how much easier it would be for me to just bundle the two of them up and send them off to public school. But our district cut all funding for SN services and the gifted program, so they would ship dd1 off to a different district instead (and they won't even acknowledge her LDs until she's in 3rd grade and at least 2 grade levels behind in at least 1 subject, which is total BS and a large part of why we pulled her out, we got her tested on our own dime) and dd2 would be bored as heck in the classroom. And with 2 littles to care for also, I'd be dragging those two around just to get dd1 and dd2 to and from school (where the bus stop is here, they aren't allowed to walk that far alone because we live on a busy street by a college so I'd be driving them to and from school) and I'd have to rearrange dd4's nap time so that its early enough in the day that she's not being awakened to go get her sisters from school................ yeah too much hassle for me, so we homeschool instead. lol

But I really like how easy it is for us to work in OHVA with lessons and how easy the k12 materials are to adjust for dd1's challenges and dd2's ability to catch on things quickly (she is the child that learned how to add and subtract in 5 minutes one day with dh and a box of cheese crackers, she just has one of those brains that soak up information almost instantly and retains it forever it seems like, really bugs her big sister and I'm dreading that dd2 just entered a money skills unit in math also now while her big sister's been in one for 2 weeks and still struggling, this is not going to be pretty)
eclipse's Avatar eclipse 02:48 AM 01-07-2010
So, ds' 5th grade History was uploaded today. I hadn't realized that it would be such a big change from the previous history courses. It's all book based rather than OLS based. Although he loves to read, he's always really enjoyed the K12 OLS history, and I don't know if he's going to enjoy this as much. I haven't seen the books yet, so I don't know what they're like, but I'm not sure how this will go with him. Frankly, he hates change and I think I might have a fight on my hands with this.
EXOLAX's Avatar EXOLAX 01:26 AM 01-08-2010
I feel fortunate that things have continued to go pretty well for us with k12. YDD is really enjoying the work and it really feels like a great fit for our family. ODD still plans to give it a try next year and we are all really excited for the opportunity. We just need to find a way to get through the rest of 3rd grade at her B&M school. She's fine with it, it's dh and I who are ready to make the switch now.

Is there anyone here with a k-2nd grader in ALP? There's a k12 class coming up next week and it will be our first national class. I thought it might be kind of fun to see if there was anyone else here would be attending.
EXOLAX's Avatar EXOLAX 01:30 AM 01-08-2010
I forgot to mention that I recently heard that our VA will be switching to the new math curriculum next year. I have not heard much about it except that is still a mastery based curriculum and it has a character who grows with the student and stays with them each curriculum year. I did hear that if a child advances to the next grade in math and does not complete it by the end of the school year they will stay with the old math program in the fall until they finish. I'd really like some more info on it as math is the primary reason our now 3rd grader wants to make the switch.
Smithie's Avatar Smithie 01:41 AM 01-08-2010
"...and would have music too if I hadn't gotten that switched to just attendance so she could do violin lessons instead because the music program reeks, coming from a professional classical musician here."

I'm no professional musician, but I LOVE music and I RESPECT music and thus, the K12 kindy music program makes me want to claw my eyes out.

We're doing well overall, though. James is going to do the end-of-year tests in Math K and Phonics K tomorrow in his elluminate conference, and then we'll get the 1st grade materials for Math, Phonics and LA. I am really looking forward to striking out on my own next year for 1st grade, but at the same time, I am learning a lot form the K12 curriculum that will help me make better choices in my own curriculum design for the early years.

If our VCS had offered a half-day program, they might well be keeping me as a participant next year. Logging six hours for a K5 student is just a daily reminder of how much I don't want a bureacracy in charge of my children's learning...
kittie313's Avatar kittie313 09:52 AM 01-08-2010
lol Smithie, its nice to know that i'm not the only one who has the same feelings about k12 music. I can tell you 1st grade music is horrible, I survived it for maybe 4 weeks before the teacher switched us to attendance-only and saved my sanity. Granted my 6yo can barely play on one string at a time on her violin right now, forget about fingering for different notes, but she's making steady slow progress and I still want to throttle her over music lessons (I'm teaching her myself and trying to find a way to afford to send her to private violin lessons now)

Melissa took iniative today, yesterday her little sister started the money unit in math K and so now she' humping it to get through the money unit in her math 1 so that her sister doesn't show her up. We haven't even had breakfast yet, and have only been awake about an hour so far, and she just finished a math lesson and assessment. I can barely see straight yet today, and yet I just did a lesson on counting on by nickels. 6am is too early for this stuff........................ But she aced the assessment, so we'll do a second math lesson during our normally scheduled math time.
kittie313's Avatar kittie313 09:54 AM 01-08-2010
Oh, how does everyone handle snow days with your local ps district? Our ps has closed today for the 4th day this week (they were in session yesterday only this week) and I haven't told the kids about a single closing because I don't want them thinking that means they don't have school either. I'm tempted to push as much through this morning as I can with schoolwork instead of doing our normal school routine and time so that the kids can go play out in the powdery piles of snow in the back yard this afternoon (if I can find all our snow gear that is)
eilonwy's Avatar eilonwy 10:13 AM 01-08-2010
ADO is canceled today because of snow; Most local districts have a 2-hr delay. My kids will have school in the morning, playtime, and then they'll head to their grandparents' house for the weekend as usual. We can't really take time off right now, as my recent/current illness lost us a lot of time and progress.
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