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Old 03-15-2004, 08:24 PM
 
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Back to the OP... No one mentioned the Little House on the Prairie books.. Loved those in the third grade, and the first few aren't too 'girly'... In fact, I think Farmer Boy is the third one, and it's all about Almanzo Wilder's boyhood in I think upstate NY. And I LOVED Roald Dalh too.. James and Giant Peach and Willy Wonka and Chocolate Factory in addition to the titles already mentioned.

My parents were fairly strict when I was a kid about what I read.. I had Laura Ingalls Wilder and all kinds of Louisa May Alcott, and some Christian book series. Those were all pretty girly, but Louisa May Alcott has some that might appeal to little boys.. I know when I ran out of options I raided my older brother's and dad's hunting/safari/boy and his dog type books and loved them, so maybe your boy might not dig the more 'gentle' titles?

My point about my parents being restrictive... I fell madly in love with Vampires when I was 13 and The Lost Boys came out.. maybe madly in love with Kiefer Sutherland would be more accurate.. anywho.. due to this love of horror-minded stuff/the restrictions my parents placed on me/my being a punk kid really, I started ripping off (aka stealing) trash novels. Some of them turned out to be very well written, some were crap, but by then I could recognize it, you know? And when I got busted with one of my favorite horror/sci-fi books.. my mom just sort of tossed her hands in the air. (mind you, she had no idea I'd stolen it!!) You do what you can, while you can. I lost interest after indulging for awhile. But I'll still curl up with a Danielle Steele when my brain longs for a good serving of cotton candy over spinach. Talk about your formulas!

I wasn't homeschooled, and it would appear that I didn't learn a whole lot about morality - no, I learned ALL *about* it from the classics I read as a child.. I just didn't learn to *practice* it from my family. I think the key theme throughout this thread is that YOU ALL CARE, and that, in the end, is going to make the difference. You're actively involved with your children's literary lives and they know your opinions about what they read. They'll hear those voices in their heads for the rest of their lives!

lizzie

It's such a relief to finally trust yourself.
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Old 03-15-2004, 11:33 PM
 
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I'm new here. Posted a couple of times in the vax thread.

We've been homeschooling for four years now. We do restrict what the kids read because of religious beliefs. However , there are thousands of books that fall into the 'safe' category. My children do not have a library card. They used to , but the library called and was harrassing my daughter. My then six year old daughter. It's a really long story there. Condensed version: mistaken identity...I thought the Brenda on the phone was her Sunday School teacher , I had no clue it was really the librarian bugging her about a book we didn't even have. All that time I was tickled the Sunday School teacher was calling to check on her during the week.

So to end
Yes we restrict what the kids read and what the check out from the library. Not mean restrict , just a simple explanation that some books blantantly go against our belief system and we won't be reading them.
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Old 03-16-2004, 12:12 AM
 
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I was an early and constant reader. My mother always restricted my books, saying "I don't think this is appropriate for you, why don't you read this instead." When I was 7 years old, I picked up a book at GoodWill called "Will the Real Gertrude Hollings Please Stand Up" and mom bought it, on the provision that she could read it first. This wasn't a problem for me because I was in the middle of a Ramona book (I adored those!) and she was a fast reader.

When she finished it she said she didn't think that it was quite appropriate for me. I read the back cover again and decided that I wanted to read it anyway. I did, and I understood what mom was saying but I still enjoyed the book. It was about a little girl who felt extremely guilty because when she was a toddler she had set the house on fire playing with matches; She hid and her mother died trying to find her, but because of where she was hidden her mother couldn't find her and she survived. A bit of a heavy plot for a 7 year old, but it certainly didn't go over my head and I really enjoyed having something complex to think about. After I discussed it with my mother, we agreed that she wouldn't have to restrict my reading anymore.

The next time the idea even came into her head was when the extended version of "Stranger in a Strange Land" came out; I was 11 and definately wanted to read it (I was a big Hienlien fan by then), but my mother felt that it was a bit too much sex. She didn't stop me, she just told me what she thought about it before I read the book.

I certainly plan to restrict my own childrens' reading. As an earlier poster said: I restrict what they watch on television, why wouldn't I pay attention to what they read? I can see how it would be a big problem for parents who didn't read as much, because they might not have an idea of what to give a child when they take a book away, but I have loads of alternatives in my head (as my mother did; she was also an early and prolific reader).

Someone asked for book suggestions; if you pm me with the age and approximate reading level, I can certainly come up with a fun, appropriate list for just about any child. I read *constantly* as a child, and while there was a fair bit of stuff that I wouldn't particularly recommend (several Star Trek titles come to mind, and I wasn't a big fan of Charles Dickens short stories) there was lots of good stuff. "Harriet the Spy", for example, is an excellent book; don't discount it just because you've seen the movie, it was a book long before then. :LOL

I was a very strange child; I read "Dune" when I was 10 and absolutely loved it. I also read "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" at 11 on my younger brother's reccomendation and loved that, as well as "Ender's Game" and "The Secret Books of Paradys" (when he was 10, my brother joined a science fiction book club and got all kinds of interesting things in the mail, which he then passed on to me). I would not reccomend the Paradys books to most kids under the age of about 16; they are *very* dark, heavy, and the sex is downright violent most of the time. (I can only think of one instance of consentual intercourse in the entire series of four books). Then again, I can't be the only 12 year old who found (would find) them interesting/appealing.

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
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Old 03-16-2004, 12:33 AM
 
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I suggest getting good book catalogues and then letting your child choose titles to select books at the library, that way he is picking from your selections.

the sonlight curriculum catalog has an extensive 'good' book list, the books in the rainbow resource , timberdoodle, chinaberry, also check out the Jim trealease book lists and the one in honey for a child's heart


i do not restrict my childrens reading, but I will *redirect* them into a dif series if I see a few choices in a row I think are not appropriate in content or in level Mary
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Old 03-16-2004, 02:34 AM
 
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We partially use Five in a Row for homeschool related stuff. They have an incredible list of wonderful books for ages 3-14. Wonderful fun family oriented books.

www.fiveinarow.com

Our new favorite is Homer Price. Really funny stories about the days of yesteryear.
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Old 04-09-2004, 07:33 PM
 
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T

I don't usually post in this forum (so Hi we're unschoolers!), but


Quote:
K$0iginally posted by Dar [/i]
I really have issues with edited classics, but that might be a different thread. If you want to read fluff, read fluff, but reading dumbed-down classics seems pointless - you don't get to read the actual classic book, but edited classics generally don't work well as fluff-reading, either. I mean, the author out that many words in there because he thought they needed to be there, how dare some editor second guess him and take them out? Just MHO...
this phenomenon makes me go ballistic. I wrote about an essay about it and it got published last week--

http://www.salon.com/books/feature/2...ows/index.html

Just thought I'd share that incase anyone wants to read a rant about "adapted" classics.
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Old 04-09-2004, 09:02 PM
 
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NoraJadesMama: Hey, read it last week... loved the article. I've seen those books at B&N and never realized they were bowdlerized. Glad I didn't waste $5 or $6 bucks to find out the hard way. Ignoring the removal of "objectionable" content (grrr), I never fail to be amazed by the philosophy that children should somehow only be exposed to books containing words they already know. How the heck are kids supposed to learn new words? Granted, it can be frustrating reading books with too advanced a vocabulary, but those are often great candidates for read aloud.

I agree about reading (or hearing) classics intact with one general exception, I do think that adapted works have a place when knowledge of stories from the original work are as important as, or even transcends, the literary quality of the work itself... i.e. the "classic" classics. DD is only 2, but in preparation for homeschooling we're collecting different versions of works like the Iliad and Odyssey, Beowulf and Gilgamesh. Everything from picture books to easy readers through middle readers.
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Old 04-09-2004, 09:30 PM
 
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I never fail to be amazed by the philosophy that children should somehow only be exposed to books containing words they already know. How the heck are kids supposed to learn new words? Granted, it can be frustrating reading books with too advanced a vocabulary, but those are often great candidates for read aloud.
exactly. Or sophisticated syntax. You learn new words by having them used, by needing them, hearing them. These writers were going for the write WORD, not writing for a marketing group--and kids can flex those language muscles more than some folks seem to give them credit for.

Quote:

I agree about reading (or hearing) classics intact with one general exception, I do think that adapted works have a place when knowledge of stories from the original work are as important as, or even transcends, the literary quality of the work itself... i.e. the "classic" classics. DD is only 2, but in preparation for homeschooling we're collecting different versions of works like the Iliad and Odyssey, Beowulf and Gilgamesh. Everything from picture books to easy readers through middle readers.
Yeah, I'm with you here, too.

Nice to meet a kindred spirit!!
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Old 04-10-2004, 03:40 AM
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Looks like a cool article, although I only got to read the first bit because I don't subscribe...

And yeah, I make exceptions for things like The Odyssey - I mean, the original is in Greek, for one thing. I read a bunch of translations to Rain, some longer, some shorter... and some were definitely "condensed".

OTOH, what good is a summary of a Shakespearean play? I guess you can sound smart in conversation, except when someone actually starts quoting the words from the play and you go clueless because you never heard the actual words...

Dar

 
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Old 04-10-2004, 10:43 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally posted by Dar
Looks like a cool article, although I only got to read the first bit because I don't subscribe...


Oops--I meant to say you can read it for free, you just have to click through a brief ad. I don't subscribe either but I read there all the time...

Quote:
And yeah, I make exceptions for things like The Odyssey - I mean, the original is in Greek, for one thing. I read a bunch of translations to Rain, some longer, some shorter... and some were definitely "condensed".

OTOH, what good is a summary of a Shakespearean play? I guess you can sound smart in conversation, except when someone actually starts quoting the words from the play and you go clueless because you never heard the actual words...

Dar
Re-tellings of Shakespeare (the original Bowlderizings) amuse me especially. So many of his plays were based on stories that were already circulating--what he added was his genius with language, his way of weaving characters and themes. Take that out and we've recycled right back to compost!:LOL

My first "ah-ha" moment with Shakespeare was watching a royal shakespeare company production in high school--that was when I realized what he was up to. It's worth waiting for.
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Old 04-10-2004, 01:13 PM
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Old 04-10-2004, 03:22 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally posted by Dar
OTOH, what good is a summary of a Shakespearean play? I guess you can sound smart in conversation, except when someone actually starts quoting the words from the play and you go clueless because you never heard the actual words...
I would have agreed 100% until very recently! I found a book of Shakespeare plays for children which explains the story and has lots of actual dialogue from the plays. I'll try to find it online to show you, but I think it's a lovely introduction to Shakespeare for K-3rd graders and will get them ready to actually watch the plays and perhaps get more out of them than they might otherwise. It's a very cool book!

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
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Old 04-10-2004, 06:26 PM
 
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A great introduction to Shakepeare can be found HERE . Granted it's just insults , but it's a ton of fun. I'm just touching on Shakespeare . Just another name among other famous authors for now.

Take that! Thou tottering plume-plucked blume bailey! What a hoot.
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Old 04-12-2004, 06:26 AM
 
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Not a homeschooler, but this really caught my attention so I hope it's ok for me to post here. I am a voracious reader. I LOVE books. When I was 11 I swiped a copy of Stephen King's Pet Semetary from my older brother. My teacher found it in my desk and called my mom because it was "inappropriate". My mom got the book back for me and told me not to take it to school anymore. She let us read whatever we wanted and I swore I'd do the same.

My 4th grader reads on an 8th grade level. Unfortunately she hates to read. The only thing that really grabs her interest are scary stories. I'm just glad there is something that does. She loves the Goosebumps series. Every Sunday we lay in the hammock and read together. We've read Frankenstein, Dracula, The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, etc... But now she's decided she wants to read Pet Semetary and all of a sudden I'm not so sure. To me the classics are scary but King is scary AND very gory and I don't think she's ready for it. Which I'm really having trouble with since I was only a year older than her when I started reading King. As much as I said I wouldn't, it looks like I will be restricting her reading choices. Oh and if anybody can recommend any other good scary kid books I'd appreciate it.
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Old 04-14-2004, 02:06 PM
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I dont restrict either. But Austyn only wants to read Yu-Gi-Oh cards and comics and he has a few Magic Treehouse books that he enjoyed. I just dont restrict much of anything, including TV and Movies (Within Reason, we wouldnt have a sex filled R movie playing for him to watch, but a non-sex filled R movie would be OK)

Wendy
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Old 04-14-2004, 02:56 PM
 
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So a nonsex movie filled with blood, gore and cussing is ok as long as there is no nudity?
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Old 04-14-2004, 03:07 PM
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No No, I was going to come back to that and make it clear, but I went and did the dishes instead! Sorry.

Some R movies are not that bad. To us. Its up to the parents to decide whats OK for their own child to watch. We hardly ever rent movies or get PPV, and we dont have HBO or SHOWTIME. But on the chance that we do get a movie, its a Family-Type Movie and IF its R rated, its only rated that way because of a few cuss words. He knows not to repeat those words.

I personally dont like Blood and Gore, so thats never in the house. It just makes me feel sick and thats just my own personal choice to not watch those.

We watch scarey movies SOMETIMES, on TV, and they usually cut the gore part anyways because its on TV.

Wendy
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