Help for teens - literacy - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
Old 01-25-2010, 01:53 PM
 
lach's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: MA
Posts: 1,923
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by savithny View Post
When I was there, there were GCSEs, O-levels, and 16-plus (which were graded in two tiers; lower grades were the GCSE grades, upper ones were O-levels).

To continue with education, you need a certain number of exam results at a certain level. Most kids in the school I was in were signed up for 6 or 8 subjects - a language, English, Maths, and then either a sciency track or a non-sciencey track.

At any rate, I wasn't aware, at the time, that there were many paths *into* education at 16, and the system as I understood it did not have a lot of room for remediation for kids older than 16. However, as I said, my info is pretty old.
I know that they've changed the tests and the way things work. I think they streamlined it and got rid of the two tiers and maybe changed some other stuff? I'm American so never did this, but my husband is English (and tried to come to the US to go to University here with only GCSEs in tow... was really surprised college didn't mean the same thing here and all the US colleges he applied to told him to finish high school first, please), and lived in England as an adult. So I'm a little hazy on most of the details.

Trying to live a simple life in a messy house in a complicated world with : DH, DD (b. 07/07), DS (b. 02/09), and DD (b. 10/10)
lach is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 01-25-2010, 04:17 PM
 
karne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 3,558
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm sort of inserting myself here, so sorry, but as a mom w/a child with dyslexia, *I* think it's very important to find the right kind of assistance. It's very common for kids w/ld's such as dyslexia to look unmotivated, resistant and even, eventually defeated or oppositional. It's incredibly demoralizing to have trouble learning to read or write, esp. in an atmosphere of 'kids will pick it up when they are ready". Not so for dyslexics.

Once kids are the age of the OP's you're running into the actual challenge of learning, along with emotional and behavioral pieces. Are there not specialists who deal with older kids with dyslexia where you are OP? Your kids need the help of specialized remediation, not tips from a book. There are many, many success stories of adults w/dyslexia learning to read and write, so it can absolutely be done. But frankly, it sounds like you need to take yourself out of the mix, recognize that as barely literate young adults your kids are at serious risk, and do some real parenting and organizing to help them. It's unacceptable in this day and age that, when we know so much about how to help, that such help is not sought.

And, I know personally, that it is hard to push your child into an uncomfortable place, esp. when they are happy and complacent where they are, ie busy and happy days. But sometimes this is what we do as parents.
karne is offline  
Old 01-25-2010, 07:30 PM
 
tessie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 1,011
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
For anyone interested, the English & Welsh (Scotland has a different system) education system is as follows:

School year you turn 16 (Year 11) you take GCSEs. Usually you take 8 to 10 subjects including English & Maths. However study commences in the school year you turn 15 (Year 10) and subjects often require extensive coursework so often you can't just rock up and take the exam.

GCSEs replaced the old two tier system of O levels and CSEs a good while back. I took mine in '93 so probably the late eighties?

School year you turn 17 (Year 12) you can commence either a two year A level course or a vocational course. If you want to attend university you will usually need 3 good A levels. (The entrance requirements are usually different for mature students.) However, to be able to take A levels you will need a number of good GCSE passes. The requirements are usually less for vocational courses but a reasonable standard of education will still be required.

There is no equivalent to the GED.

Most job application forms require you to list your GSCEs and A levels. If, an 18 year old, you don't have any qualifications or experience you will be unlikely to get any job outside of a factory or labouring of some kind.
tessie is offline  
Old 01-25-2010, 08:21 PM
 
zinemama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: from the fire roads to the interstate
Posts: 6,298
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm not sure where all this dyslexia talk is coming from. Just because a person has been allowed to watch TV for years instead of getting an education (at home or wherever) doesn't mean he or she has a learning disability. Although it is true that these kids are going to work very hard, very fast to achieve the goal of college (finishing HS) that the OP says they want.
zinemama is offline  
Old 01-25-2010, 08:28 PM
 
karne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 3,558
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by zinemama View Post
I'm not sure where all this dyslexia talk is coming from. Just because a person has been allowed to watch TV for years instead of getting an education (at home or wherever) doesn't mean he or she has a learning disability. Although it is true that these kids are going to work very hard, very fast to achieve the goal of college (finishing HS) that the OP says they want.
Post #10, by the OP, in which she states that she thinks her two oldest may have dyslexia.
karne is offline  
Old 01-25-2010, 08:45 PM
 
zinemama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: from the fire roads to the interstate
Posts: 6,298
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Yeah...but what I'm saying is, I'm not sure why she would think that, given that by her own admission she hasn't really tried to teach them anything.

For example, back in 2005 the OP stated:

For me I unschool because I never thought about having to provide an education - I didn't want to hand my kids over to someone else to raise. I just carried on having my kids with me, living with them, doing stuff together, having fun

And that same year, about her daughter:

She blames me for not having "taught" her.
So I do feel guilty. Maybe if I had home-schooled instead of unschooled, she wouldn't feel so bad about herself.


So the idea that her kids are this way because they're dsylexic sounds a bit thin to me. Although, who knows, they could be.
zinemama is offline  
Old 01-25-2010, 08:50 PM
 
karne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 3,558
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Yes, I get it, I think. How does she know what's actually going on? I'm not up on the history, so just going from the OP's comments in this thread..
karne is offline  
 
User Tag List

Thread Tools


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off