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#31 of 54 Old 03-30-2010, 05:05 PM
 
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What are other things you would do with such a fantastic child? To help him discover his world and himself and, to teach stuff.

Thank you!
Let him shadow you at home...fold laundry together, wash and dry dishes, sweep the floors, water the plants, vacuum the rugs, dust furniture, garden...etc!

Read to him!

Sing songs!

Do seasonal arts and crafts

Let him play!

Save the flashcards for much much later!
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#32 of 54 Old 03-30-2010, 06:26 PM
 
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Hey, you jest, but here's a great article by David Albert: Phonics in Utero Lillian
Oh, wow! Thanks, Lillian, that's exactly what we've been looking for

*shakes head in disbelief*

Happy and in love with my family!
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#33 of 54 Old 03-31-2010, 11:08 AM
 
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I think there's more to it than this study leads you to believe.
I think this is always the case. Personally, I embrace "research" that makes sense to me, and I am very skeptical of the others. But I'll listen to anyone's opinion and try to keep an open mind.....

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#34 of 54 Old 03-31-2010, 11:56 AM
 
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IMO, any time in front of the tv at such an early age, even watching Sesame Street or another "learning" program, is taking time away from their real job of learning in their environment and with their caregiver.

What are the consequences of this early stimulation of a part of the brain that would not usually awaken naturally until much later? I guess we'll find out when all the YBCR babies are older!

Obviously, I haven't used the program. But is it really even "reading"? On the commercials, it looks like, (from the baby's POV) I recognize a shape on this piece of paper, make a response, and Mom goes wild! The baby is not learning phonics, sight words, and context (because he/she IS developmentally incapable of this as an infant); baby is learning how to get that magic response from the parent when Mom holds up a card.

JMO.
The time my child spends in front of the TV is time I am otherwise engaged. I am usually alone in the house with her when I'm trying to do chores. I know that to me and other single parents, something that will keep my child entertained (and happily and safely confined in her high chair) while I am cooking or doing other chores that would be difficult or dangerous with a child underfoot is a godsend. I learned the hard way--when I sloshed boiling water out of my spaghetti pot while letting my child hang onto my legs and we both barely avoided being seriously burned, that sometimes it's best for a child to not be in constant contact with the caregiver (and I can assure you that this "caregiver" wishes she had a housekeeper and cook so she woudln't have to engage in tasks that might be unsafe for the child to participate in). My 17 month old is at the point now that she can occupy herself for several minutes at a time with duplo blocks, her pegboard, or simply buckling and unbuckling her high chair harness. But I KNOW I can get 20-30 minutes SOLID, uninterrupted time if she's fed, has had plenty of one-on-one time ahead of time, is diapered, rested, and engaged in some sort of children's video program. I don't know what moms did before TV. I know playpens can be handy, but my child was unhappy in hers, and it stressed me out to let her cry. I do sometimes have my older children at home to help, but they are in school or at their father's a lot of the time.

I read online somethere that someone traveling rural Turkey came upon a toddler with a one end of a rope tied around her waist, the other end tied to some stationary object, and no other human being in sight--I guess the parents were otherwise occupied and were trying to keep the child safe, and had no "electronic babysitter". I relied much more on my sling when my child was smaller, lighter, and less active. It doesn't work so well for us now.

Glen Doman's book "How To Teach Your Baby to Read" came out over 40 years ago, and I have seen several parents who were early readers enthusiastically using the same methods on their children. I haven't heard of any "victims" of these programs sharing horror stories of how flashcards ruined their lives, but I'd like to, if they are out there somewhere...

I know the YBCR program has been improved over the years. I am not familiar with the program when it was first being marketed--seems I saw some negative reviews regarding their quality on Amazon or somewhere. I think the current DVDs are GREAT, well-made and are interactive, give context to the words, and even though it is "sight reading"--it's a "good thing" IMO. I have to say that my child is now bored with the DVD's, but was quite engaged with them for several months.

Lydia
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#35 of 54 Old 03-31-2010, 01:46 PM
 
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What evidence is there that learning to read is easiest at an early age? My experience with child-led learning suggests precisely the opposite. I see kids who were taught letter-sounds and sight-words by their parents at age 18-24 months, put in academic preschools at age 3 and by 1st or 2nd grade become solid fluent readers, many well above grade level. To me that translates into *five solid years* of literacy development.

My kids went from beginning reading to the same level of fluency in the space of 2-12 weeks. I know many other self-directed homeschooled kids who followed a similar trajectory.

Do you have evidence that it is easiest to learn to read early? I've never seen any. I've seen evidence that if a child is in school and doesn't learn "on time" that there are negative emotional and self-esteem repercussions of being subjected to a curriculum that moves relentlessly forward on the assumption that literacy has been attained. But that's a problem with school's assumptions (one not applicable in a homeschooling situation) and not evidence of waning literacy learning ability. In fact, in Scandinavian and eastern European nations where literacy instruction is delayed until age 7 or 8, literacy rates are higher and literacy-related learning disability rates are lower.

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#36 of 54 Old 03-31-2010, 01:51 PM
 
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[QUOTE=Savoir Faire;15236283]

In the long run, I doubt someone knowing how to read earlier than someone else is important.

In my opinion...teaching a "baby to read" is just kind of weird. Childhood is short. There is no need for flashcards.[/QUOTE

MTE on this too

It's not necessary and it's totally weird imo.

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#37 of 54 Old 03-31-2010, 01:58 PM
 
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no time to read every post, but i will just add that in YBCR infomercials are the creepiest things i have ever seen on TV! why cant parents just read to and with your children and let them see you reading for pleasure as a model? not to mention all the studies done about how children under 2 should watch ZERO TV, its that bad for them?

i did things the old fashioned way and both my boys were fluent readers by age 4. if they had been slower to pick up on it, there would have been no pressure and they would simply have been fluent at age 6 or 8 or whatever, but as individuals, they were ready at an early age. and we did it with them on my lap, being snuggled, and it worked for us.

i dont doubt a 2 yo can learn to read, i just wouldnt want it to be at the expense of having to be babysat by the boob tube.

i have several friends who LOVE baby einstein, but i cant say i see how their kids are in any way at an advantage academically.

Bring back the old MDC
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#38 of 54 Old 03-31-2010, 01:59 PM
 
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I always find it really crazy how so many americans are in such a rush to push academics and things on such young children so soon. Yes their brains are like sponges then but that doesn't mean they need to be burnt out. Why does a baby need to read at that age? Seriously? I see no reason why a baby needs to read, it's more of the parents thing...they want the baby to read. I'm thinking most of them want to do it because it gives them bragging rights, to one up another mom on the play ground playing field or something equally bizarre imo. I am not trying to insult anyone here but most of the people I know irl would use it for one uping another parent because there is no logical reason why a baby needs to read at that age honestly. Unless someone can give me an example of factual info that proves it makes a difference in the *very* long run like into teenhood and adulthood...I'll continue to believe its utterly useless.
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#39 of 54 Old 03-31-2010, 02:28 PM
 
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I don't have experience w/ ybcr, though my bias opinion from seeing the ads are it's just a sad product of our super competitive parenting culture.
I just wanted to add my experience to support those feeling like delaying all this is really the way to go.
My sister could sound things out and read but rarely did when she was 5 or 6. She was then unschooled and was read to every day but showed no interest in reading herself until she was maybe 10. I remember her having a period of relearning and then the first book she read was a dense 400 page young adult novel. She has now recently published an essay, she is incredibly creative, has attended art school, won rave reviews on her critical writing at college, knows a great deal about biology and agriculture. Is returning to finish college now in her mid 20s on a scholarship. Everyone's different! If she had attended a regular school she may have been branded with a learning disability when all she needed was time. Give your kids time!
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#40 of 54 Old 03-31-2010, 02:44 PM
 
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why cant parents just read to and with your children and let them see you reading for pleasure as a model?
I remember telling an acquaintance about the delightful time I was having with my son with the Little House books, and she thought for a moment and said, "I think Suzanne read those when she was five." She wasn't even sure - she had little if any personal experience of the books. I actually felt a little sad for her daughter missing out on the incredible fun of sharing those places and people and times with her mom. Our time spent together in books were some of the more wonderful times my son and I spent together. - Lillian
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#41 of 54 Old 03-31-2010, 02:46 PM
 
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many I see no reason why a baby needs to read, it's more of the parents thing...they want the baby to read. I'm thinking most of them want to do it because it gives them bragging rights, to one up another mom on the play ground playing field or something equally bizarre imo. I am not trying to insult anyone here but most of the people I know irl would use it for one uping another parent because there is no logical reason why a baby needs to read at that age honestly.
To be VERY honest, I think it is a bit of a self-esteem issue for ME. I think I would feel like an utter failure as a mother if my children struggled in school. I keep telling them that if a "C" was the grade they got when they did their best, I'd be proud of them for doing their best work. But I really feel better knowing that my children produce "A"s when they do their best. I expect they do, too. I have other issues and areas where I feel like I have let my family down. It does make me feel good to send my kids to school having a "head start", and I wish the schools were set up differently. I love homeschooling because the child can go at his or her own pace and don't have the same sense of "failure" that they get if they "fall behind" in public school. I just don't want my children to struggle any more than they have to, and God knows that even in the very best of situations, our children will struggle ....

I know that having good grades isn't everything. I also try to teach my children to be kind to others and helpful and honest and all those nice things. I think character development is more important than academics. Some of the most wonderful people I know weren't straight A students. It's not a reflection on their value as a human being.

Having straight As in school is no guarantee of success or even happiness later down the road. But I don't think it hurts.

I have no conscious desire to "one up" other moms, but rather I encourage them, if they are interested, to teach their babies to read. I think it is great that we are all individuals and have the freedom to raise our babies how we want. I am very happy for the children who do well in school, whether they learned to "read" at one year, or six years old. But I'm sad for the ones in 4th, 5th or 6th grade and beyond who are basically illiterate. And there are many such children.

If my children are happy, healthy, and well-adjusted and make good marks in school, it makes me feel like I'm doing something "RIGHT" and hopefully makes up for my faults as a mother (while I'm working to eliminate those faults that I'm so painfully aware of).

I don't think mothers should be "shamed" into teaching or not teaching their babies as they see fit any more than they should be "shamed" into breastfeeding or not, co-sleeping or not, etc. I feel like we should all follow our hearts and observe the effects in our children.

Lydia
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#42 of 54 Old 03-31-2010, 03:02 PM
 
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I remember telling an acquaintance about the delightful time I was having with my son with the Little House books, and she thought for a moment and said, "I think Suzanne read those when she was five." She wasn't even sure - she had little if any personal experience of the books. I actually felt a little sad for her daughter missing out on the incredible fun of sharing those places and people and times with her mom. Our time spent together in books were some of the more wonderful times my son and I spent together. - Lillian
You mean she didn't sit and read aloud with her kids? I can't imagine!! The Little House books are fantastic to read together. My son (now 11) always did and still does like being read to for pleasure, more than reading himself. My daughter was always too impatient and if I was reading out loud, she'd be reading (faster) silently over my shoulder, but she'd still have to wait for me to finish and turn the page. She always has her nose in a book and she's soon to be 13.

We always had a "family altar" experience before bedtime when I was growing up, and in addition to Bible reading and prayers, my Dad would read aloud some secular material. I remember him reading aloud the Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings and the Chronicles of Narnia when I was in high school. Good times.

I guess one of the tremendous advantages to being able to read fluently is so you can read aloud to your kids!!! Wonder if your friend has trouble reading herself?

Lydia
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#43 of 54 Old 03-31-2010, 03:17 PM
 
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One thing I really missed out on with my older son was reading some of the classic books to him. He was my three year old reader, and once he learned, he never looked back and NEVER wanted me to read to him. I've decided that we need to start having a book club (with only 2 members - son and I!) and read books at the same time and discuss them. My daughter was also an early reader (4ish) but at almost 7, she still loves to be read to every day. She could have read Little House and her own, but I'm so glad she let me read it to her.
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#44 of 54 Old 03-31-2010, 03:27 PM
 
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One thing I really missed out on with my older son was reading some of the classic books to him. He was my three year old reader, and once he learned, he never looked back and NEVER wanted me to read to him. I've decided that we need to start having a book club (with only 2 members - son and I!) and read books at the same time and discuss them. My daughter was also an early reader (4ish) but at almost 7, she still loves to be read to every day. She could have read Little House and her own, but I'm so glad she let me read it to her.
Thanks for sharing this! If I have this same "problem" with my little one, I'll be glad to have the "book club" idea.

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#45 of 54 Old 03-31-2010, 03:45 PM
 
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You mean she didn't sit and read aloud with her kids? I can't imagine!!
That's unfortunately actually quite common. I used to give beautiful books to children for birthdays sometimes, knowing that the parents, although not enthused at first, would have to start reading to them - and I'll confess to taking an impish pleasure in knowing it was going to force that scenario and that the children and parents would all enjoy it (which they reported later that the did). Lillian
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#46 of 54 Old 03-31-2010, 03:56 PM
 
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Lillian is an evil genius
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#47 of 54 Old 03-31-2010, 04:19 PM
 
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Lillian is an evil genius
Well, that's sorta' the way even I looked at it the time. Lillian
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#48 of 54 Old 03-31-2010, 04:22 PM
 
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The commercial for this product just makes me every time when I hear the mother describe her five year old as "incredibly well-rounded". He's 5! F-I-V-E!

DD1 7/13/05 DD2 9/20/10
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#49 of 54 Old 03-31-2010, 05:06 PM
 
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It does make me wonder sometimes how I can get cheap "used" books at goodwill or the used bookstore and they are inscribed to a child from "grandma" or whoever, but they look like they've never been cracked open! I just hope that the child gets lots of books read aloud at day care or elsewhere!

Lyda
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#50 of 54 Old 03-31-2010, 06:33 PM
 
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I actually felt a little sad for her daughter missing out on the incredible fun of sharing those places and people and times with her mom. Our time spent together in books were some of the more wonderful times my son and I spent together. - Lillian
As the mom to a bunch of early spontaneous readers, I just wanted to point out that independent reading shouldn't mean that you don't read aloud to your children. I still read aloud to all my kids even though they've been reading on their own for ages. My eldest has been reading independently for 12 years and I still read aloud to her, though admittedly not so much these days. But at ages 5-10, we always had at least two books that I was reading aloud to her every day.

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#51 of 54 Old 04-05-2011, 12:24 PM
 
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I used Your Baby Can Read and thought it was alright. I was not in love with the program, and neither was my baby. It did not capture my baby's attention and make him excited to learn. I did find a different program that we are currently using and I am very happy with it. It has more of an entertaining spin on it that Your Baby Can Read. My baby has really enjoyed using this program and so far we are noticing some great results. My baby is recognizing his body barts and basic shapes and colors. I would definitely  reccomend this program to other parents. If perhapes you already own Your Baby Can Read, together the two program can really complement each other. I hope this helps. winky.gif

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#52 of 54 Old 05-13-2011, 08:49 AM
 
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Edited.

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#53 of 54 Old 05-14-2011, 09:15 PM
 
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I used Your Baby Can Read and thought it was alright. I was not in love with the program, and neither was my baby. It did not capture my baby's attention and make him excited to learn. I did find a different program that we are currently using and I am very happy with it. It has more of an entertaining spin on it that Your Baby Can Read. My baby has really enjoyed using this program and so far we are noticing some great results. My baby is recognizing his body barts and basic shapes and colors. I would definitely  reccomend this program to other parents. If perhapes you already own Your Baby Can Read, together the two program can really complement each other. I hope this helps. winky.gif

I did something similar in helping my baby learn shapes, colors, and body parts. I called it "talking to her about things in her life".  Body parts she got from playing "where is baby's X? here's baby's X? where's Mommy's X? here's Mommy's X?", colors from the 10-pack crayola set of paints and cars in parking lots, and shapes from a shape sorter, because those were times when her attention and interest were on those particular concepts.

 

She's also learned a lot from YouTube videos because she can point to ask for the ones on topics that interest her.

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#54 of 54 Old 05-15-2011, 07:21 PM
 
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We used it, SOOOOOO boring!   And ds didnt learn a thing from it.   

 

He is learning to read from 100 easy lessons, and lots and lots of reading books to him!   We aren't going as fast as one lesson a day (sense he is only 3), but he is sounding out words already and can read actual books if he is in the right mood to sit there. 

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