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Old 06-21-2010, 01:53 PM
 
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Originally Posted by sha_lyn View Post
Your efforts to get the government to pay for you to homeschool your own children will likely hurt all homeschoolers in the future. With government $$ comes government regulations.
I don't agree. I live in a BC, Canada. It's a low-regulation jurisdiction. You merely need to register your homeschooler so that they will not accidentally be considered truant. This procedure has not once been threatened since it was first enshrined in the education act almost 30 years ago.

However, for the past 17 years there has been a second option available for homeschoolers, one which pairs reporting and supervision with financial and other support. Many such programs are available in many different flavours and many homeschooling families make use of them happily. Our own family has used three such programs for various children over the years. And yet we're always free to move back to the first option.

You can continue to predict doom and gloom through encroaching regulation, but almost 20 years of experience where I live suggests your worries are ill-founded.

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Old 06-21-2010, 03:17 PM
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I also do not agree with your restrictive definition of homeschooling. There are many people in this community who use K12 and similar programs and consider themselves homeschooling families. And since their children receive their education at home, it's hard for me to see how they could not be considered homeschoolers. Again, this issue is not defined by you and you alone.
It isn't my restrictive definition of homeschooling, it is the legal definition of homeschooling and IMHO the insistence that virtual or "umbrella" chater schools are homeschooling can hurt the rights of those who want to homeschool (per the legal definition).

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You can continue to predict doom and gloom through encroaching regulation, but almost 20 years of experience where I live suggests your worries are ill-founded.
You know I might buy your ill-founded comment had I not just received a letter from our flexible spending account on how the new health care reform laws will change what we can spend our own money on for it to qualify as a tax deductible expense. I will now need a prescription for OTC allergy medications to be able to use our flexible medical spending account to pay for them Therefore it will no longer be worth having the account since the co-op pay for Dr's visits for the mandatory prescriptions would cost more than the tax savings.
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Old 06-21-2010, 03:41 PM
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I also wanted to add that schools here are under funded as it is and school systems are making drastic cutbacks to stay open. Allowing homeschoolers to receive funds would mean an increase in taxes. I would prefer to not have to pay in the money to begin with than to have my taxes increased so that I could receive back a small portion of what I paid in.
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Old 06-21-2010, 03:47 PM
 
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This his gone way off topic and I won't touch on the healthcare issue. I guess it's good for the OP to see how people really feel about the topic, good and bad.

I see the umbrella schools as meeting a supply and demand. Many parents are no longer willing to put their kids in schools full-time. They want more say and they want more independence. Charter schools are giving some parents what they want. It's a perfect middle-ground for a lot of parents. That doesn't mean that they're not homeschooling. There's the legal definition because these charter schools are so new and they do create confusion as to rules and regulations. There are lots of examples of how "legal" definitions do not match reality. Marriage, race and religion are some other examples. You can't use them to tell other people what's real and not real.
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Old 06-21-2010, 04:32 PM
 
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It isn't my restrictive definition of homeschooling, it is the legal definition of homeschooling and IMHO the insistence that virtual or "umbrella" chater schools are homeschooling can hurt the rights of those who want to homeschool (per the legal definition).
I personally think just the opposite. I think that keeping the homeschooling umbrella as wide as possible will only help homeschoolers find acceptance, socially and legally. I've really never understood the animosity towards people who feel more comfortable participating in an umbrella school rather than winging it. When you're already a member of a suspect social minority, why try to make things even more difficult?

Trying to live a simple life in a messy house in a complicated world with : DH, DD (b. 07/07), DS (b. 02/09), and DD (b. 10/10)
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Old 06-21-2010, 09:18 PM
 
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The state of Alaska does not help pay for homeschooling. There are a number of small, rural districts that run distance education programs (much like the charter programs in Washington and California). These programs are available to students statewide and do provide funds for curriculum and activities. This increases funding for the rural districts because what they pay out to students is less than they receive per student. The students are considered to be enrolled in those districts and are officially public school students subject to school regulations and standardized testing.

By and large, this is a mutually beneficial arrangement. The funds help families afford to teach their children at home and the extra funds benefit the rural districts. That said, families who use these programs are subject to a great deal more oversight than they otherwise would be. Alaska's homeschool laws are some of the most relaxed in the nation if a family chooses to homeschool independently.

I'm not sure anyone really cares about this, but I wouldn't want anyone to be confused.
We use this type of program (we also live in Alaska) for 5 of our kids.

For our highschoolers, it provides about $2000/year per student. For 4-8th graders, about $1800, and for k-3rd about $1600 per student. My preschooler this year will also get an allotment of $200.

The catch is that 4 times a year we turn in work samples and one-sentence updates on each student's progress in each subject. Different schools have different reporting requirements...we were with one Distance Ed school that required full paragraphs, hours spent learning each subject, total hours per quarter, etc., even for kindy students.

We also do annual testing starting at Grade 3. My kids happen to love tests, so this has never been a problem for us. Some parents I know *hate* testing of any kind. I admit it's not an extremely useful tool, but it's easy.

The money is school district funded, so it's tax money that's already being collected. For every thousand spent per student, my understanding is that about three thousand goes back to the school (or distance ed program).

We pay for sports, music, curriculum, art supplies, etc., this way. We are also allotted one laptop per 4 kids, and a printer as well. There are other perks,such as chess club, Battle of the Books, Academic Decathlon, Close UP, etc.

HTH.

love, p

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Old 06-21-2010, 10:52 PM
 
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We use this type of program (we also live in Alaska) for 5 of our kids.

For our highschoolers, it provides about $2000/year per student. For 4-8th graders, about $1800, and for k-3rd about $1600 per student. My preschooler this year will also get an allotment of $200.

The catch is that 4 times a year we turn in work samples and one-sentence updates on each student's progress in each subject. Different schools have different reporting requirements...we were with one Distance Ed school that required full paragraphs, hours spent learning each subject, total hours per quarter, etc., even for kindy students.

We also do annual testing starting at Grade 3. My kids happen to love tests, so this has never been a problem for us. Some parents I know *hate* testing of any kind. I admit it's not an extremely useful tool, but it's easy.

The money is school district funded, so it's tax money that's already being collected. For every thousand spent per student, my understanding is that about three thousand goes back to the school (or distance ed program).

We pay for sports, music, curriculum, art supplies, etc., this way. We are also allotted one laptop per 4 kids, and a printer as well. There are other perks,such as chess club, Battle of the Books, Academic Decathlon, Close UP, etc.

HTH.

love, p
I was hoping you would chime in!
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Old 06-21-2010, 10:56 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Lauraloo thanks for the Mi regulations update.
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Old 06-21-2010, 11:40 PM
 
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Originally Posted by lach View Post
I personally think just the opposite. I think that keeping the homeschooling umbrella as wide as possible will only help homeschoolers find acceptance, socially and legally. I've really never understood the animosity towards people who feel more comfortable participating in an umbrella school rather than winging it. When you're already a member of a suspect social minority, why try to make things even more difficult?
I'm inclined to agree with this.

Personally, I look at the amount of oversight, record keeping, work samples, and so forth required from people I know using charter schools here in California (or even from DS's more paperwork-intensive independent study school) vs. the amount required of people in more restrictive states, and there's no comparison - the charter school requires WAAAAAY less.

I mean, I see people from restrictive states talking about having to keep ALL work from the past several years, submitting detailed syllabi every year, finding a sympathetic certified teacher to administer state-required standardized tests, and things like that, whereas the charter school may require the parent meeting with the teacher once a month (not necessarily at the family home or with the children in attendance - it's truly a teacher meeting, not a welfare check/home inspection), one work sample per subject per semester, and a yearly standardized test administered by the charter.

No, you can't use the funds to buy religious curriculum... but you're still allowed to use those materials if you choose, so how does that change the situation negatively from if you were homeschooling independently? At the very least, you can use the funds to buy any non-religious curriculum, supplies, or extracurriculars you'd otherwise have had to pay for yourself, and pay for only the religious material out of pocket instead of everything.

It seems to me that this is a step in the right direction in terms of government oversight compared to the more restrictive states. I do agree that it would be bad if the availability of these programs took away from the options for homeschooling independently. However, as with many slippery slope arguments, the hypothetical possibility of a slippery slope doesn't mean that one actually exists... or that there aren't other dangers, such as a previously less restrictive state adopting more restrictive regulations which may be more onerous than the presence of charters.

I also agree that the availability of these programs leads more people to homeschooling, and perhaps eventually to homeschooling independently. Personally, we were on the fence as to whether to enroll DS in kindergarten or not. We chose to go with the independent study school, due to the support, resources, and oversight it provided (I didn't trust we'd get anything at all done without some form of external motivation). Next year we'll be "legally homeschooling" for the first time, as the state we're moving to doesn't offer charter schools that meet our needs. I'm really not at all sure we would have had the confidence for that if we hadn't started out with more of a safety net.

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Old 06-22-2010, 02:11 AM
 
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We use this type of program (we also live in Alaska) for 5 of our kids.

For our highschoolers, it provides about $2000/year per student. For 4-8th graders, about $1800, and for k-3rd about $1600 per student. My preschooler this year will also get an allotment of $200.

The catch is that 4 times a year we turn in work samples and one-sentence updates on each student's progress in each subject. Different schools have different reporting requirements...we were with one Distance Ed school that required full paragraphs, hours spent learning each subject, total hours per quarter, etc., even for kindy students.

We also do annual testing starting at Grade 3. My kids happen to love tests, so this has never been a problem for us. Some parents I know *hate* testing of any kind. I admit it's not an extremely useful tool, but it's easy.

The money is school district funded, so it's tax money that's already being collected. For every thousand spent per student, my understanding is that about three thousand goes back to the school (or distance ed program).

We pay for sports, music, curriculum, art supplies, etc., this way. We are also allotted one laptop per 4 kids, and a printer as well. There are other perks,such as chess club, Battle of the Books, Academic Decathlon, Close UP, etc.

HTH.

love, p
Ditto and nod.

I check in with a contact teacher (and by "check in" - I mean jot a one-line email, or leave a message on his voicemail saying, "We're doing great! Just checking in!" once a month. I send in a very simple overview of what we've studied, I/we decide what we'll study and determine our coursework independently, I do all quarterly/semester/yearly assessments, except state-mandated testing for 3rd grade and up.

The $$ is WELL worth the little bit of effort and oversight.

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Oh and BTW, Charter schools such as K12 are not homeschooling. They are public school.
You are wrong. Period.
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Old 06-22-2010, 03:07 AM
 
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For those who think signing up with a school like IDEA (in Alaska) is not really homeschooling, well, you're wrong.

We get to make up our curriculum if we want. We don't have to buy boxed anything. We can study whatever we want, as long as our school monies don't go for religious education. (You can still use programs that are religious, and even use them for grades, but the schools themselves can't pay for the religious parts of any curriculum).

We use a HUGE mishmash of stuff to homeschool, just the same as any "freestyle" homeschooler. I don't teach to the tests any more than you do, I promise. Since my kids enjoy testing time, I honestly don't see the issues with yearly testing. Maybe I'll feel different if one of my kids honestly ever hates tests.

We ALREADY pay an exhorbitant amount of money in taxes for schools. THere is absolutely no reason why that money shouldn't come back to us for use in educating our children *as we see fit.*

Edited to say: Work samples for us are: One page of whatever subject they're studying. (Ex., one page of Right STart Math, one of history, etc.). We can mix our work samples...our history sample can be a story about the Romans, and the writing part counts as Language Arts. Our art is a picture I take of all their artwork, then print from the computer (so I don't have to lose any of their paintings ).

It's not like I spend one day every week collecting work samples or something. I pick one page every quarter, and turn it in. Twice a year I write a one-sentence progress report on each subject. My teens do their own grades, and their own record-keeping. Really. It's as easy or as complicated as we, as a family, want it to be.


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Old 06-22-2010, 11:29 AM
 
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The state of Alaska does not help pay for homeschooling. There are a number of small, rural districts that run distance education programs (much like the charter programs in Washington and California). These programs are available to students statewide and do provide funds for curriculum and activities. This increases funding for the rural districts because what they pay out to students is less than they receive per student. The students are considered to be enrolled in those districts and are officially public school students subject to school regulations and standardized testing.

By and large, this is a mutually beneficial arrangement. The funds help families afford to teach their children at home and the extra funds benefit the rural districts. That said, families who use these programs are subject to a great deal more oversight than they otherwise would be. Alaska's homeschool laws are some of the most relaxed in the nation if a family chooses to homeschool independently.

I'm not sure anyone really cares about this, but I wouldn't want anyone to be confused.
Thanks for explaining! We have some friends that were talking about moving to AK in part because they said the state pays you to hs, I thought it seemed too good to be true!

Can I just say how sick to death I am of being told how "privileged" I must be? You know how much money I had in the bank when dh got his UNEMPLOYMENT yesterday? NEGATIVE 129.61 Before he lost his job we never made more than 30K a year. So seriously, spare me the self-righteous pontificating.
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Old 06-22-2010, 12:00 PM
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GA Cyber Acadmey- Full-time, tuition-free online public school option
http://www.k12.com/gca/

Alaska Virtual Academy-Full-time, tuition-free online public school option
http://www.k12.com/akva/

I could post other but you get the point. Are these websites wrong? Are all the parents I know in GA that used K12 Cyber Academy wrong? Are all the parents wrong who pulled their children out of GA Cyber Academy because of all the control that the school had over when and what their kids learned?


BTW: I never addressed programs like IDEA, I said charter schools like K12. IDEA does not claim to be a chater school as far as I can find in the website. Thanks a lot for putting words in my mouth.
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Old 06-22-2010, 12:21 PM
 
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GA Cyber Acadmey- Full-time, tuition-free online public school option
http://www.k12.com/gca/

Alaska Virtual Academy-Full-time, tuition-free online public school option
http://www.k12.com/akva/

I could post other but you get the point. Are these websites wrong? Are all the parents I know in GA that used K12 Cyber Academy wrong? Are all the parents wrong who pulled their children out of GA Cyber Academy because of all the control that the school had over when and what their kids learned?


BTW: I never addressed programs like IDEA, I said charter schools like K12.
No, Sha_lyn, you're not "wrong." Not legally anyway Like I said in earlier, I gave up the parent partnered program near me because of pride. I really don't want the state in my education and I resent having to write a monthly report about what we're doing. When they wanted me to start listing hours and then hours at home vs. hours there...that was it and I left. What we're telling you is that you can't tell someone that they're not "real" homeschoolers just because they use one of these programs. It's not that black and white. It's offensive to parents who give up a lot, just like you, who teach their kids at home, often using curriculum that they put together themselves (just like you) who have made the best decision they can for their child (just like you).

I know some parents who recieve all of the curriculum, arts, science, all of it a box each semester from the school district. To me, it seems like that would be no fun. I like to dig through curriculums and find cool stuff to use. It works for them though and they're still doing it at home.

Using the PP program here really helped me when I thought I couldn't do it anymore. I felt like we weren't making any friends, we were bored, we had no idea what resources were available and couldn't afford what resources we did know about. It really helped to get us through a rough patch that may have meant that I gave up and sent my kids to school.
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Old 06-22-2010, 12:38 PM
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We could go round about this all day and never get anywhere. Yes I probably got too wound up at the privileged comment and should have just kept quiet, however I really don't see why all the animosity toward me pointing out that public charter schools are public schools. IMHO blurring that line can hurt homeschooling. You can call me paranoid if you want, but my experiences over 42 years has told me different.
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Old 06-22-2010, 12:49 PM
 
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GA Cyber Acadmey- Full-time, tuition-free online public school option
http://www.k12.com/gca/

Alaska Virtual Academy-Full-time, tuition-free online public school option
http://www.k12.com/akva/

I could post other but you get the point. Are these websites wrong? Are all the parents I know in GA that used K12 Cyber Academy wrong? Are all the parents wrong who pulled their children out of GA Cyber Academy because of all the control that the school had over when and what their kids learned?


BTW: I never addressed programs like IDEA, I said charter schools like K12. IDEA does not claim to be a chater school as far as I can find in the website. Thanks a lot for putting words in my mouth.
Legally, my kids are public school students. If we did things 100% on our own, legally they'd be private school students. AFAIK, in California there's no legal designation of "homeschooler." That's part of why this discussion is so strange to me.

Socially and academically, we're as much homeschoolers as any other family that learns from home. Seriously, I was able to UNSCHOOL DD last spring with no negative repercussions.

I believe in MORE options, not fewer.
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Old 06-22-2010, 01:06 PM
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Oh and I have never said that other options should not be available (although I can see how it was could be implied when I reacted to the privledge comment). I've said things like the lines should not be blurred, pointed out the legal definitions etc.

I guess it just boils down to semantics. I would say options other than homeschooling, where many of you would say other homeschooling options.
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Old 06-22-2010, 01:55 PM
 
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Legally, my kids are public school students. If we did things 100% on our own, legally they'd be private school students. AFAIK, in California there's no legal designation of "homeschooler." That's part of why this discussion is so strange to me.

Socially and academically, we're as much homeschoolers as any other family that learns from home. Seriously, I was able to UNSCHOOL DD last spring with no negative repercussions.

I believe in MORE options, not fewer.


Basically, all of that.
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Old 06-22-2010, 02:39 PM
 
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When posting, please remember that homeschoolers are very diverse in how we homeschool, and this board is inclusive and there is a place for all. Please do not judge others who homeschool in different ways. It is great to state your opinion, but do so respectfully and do not take issue with others. Thank you for understanding and cooperation.

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Old 06-22-2010, 08:32 PM
 
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"I feel like we just had this conversation, and it came out that not all homeschoolers are against more regulation. Please keep in mind that homeschoolers are not all of one mindset about all things, including issues relating to homeschooling, including government oversight. Saying "I don't care what you want, I only care about what I want" and also insisting that others also only care about what you want seems not terribly conducive to having a conversation.

I also do not agree with your restrictive definition of homeschooling. There are many people in this community who use K12 and similar programs and consider themselves homeschooling families. And since their children receive their education at home, it's hard for me to see how they could not be considered homeschoolers. Again, this issue is not defined by you and you alone."

OK, that was everything I was going to say this year, only nicer.

K12, in my state, is in REALITY homeschooling with a mediocre boxed curriculum plus 5 hours per week of parent-selected complementary curriculum (in our case, read-alouds, classes I paid for, notebooking and prehistory documentaries). The sole involvement of the "teacher" was to give my child two DIEBLES assessments, which my child easily aced. I don't know what to tell you. The kid was homeschooled.

THAT SAID, the only reason I got within 5 miles of the K12 boxed curriculum that the charter school offered was that my child needed occupational therapy and I could not afford it. If I had had access to an umbrella school like they have in CA and several other states, then I would have gotten some help with at least one of my three academic expenses (curriculum, extracurrics, therapy) that would have helped me to be able to manage the others.

I'm in favor of more options, not of an umbrella school requirement for all someschoolers. And I am sick to death of being treated like some kid of traitor or fake because I think it's unjust for families to have to undertake something as demanding and value-producing as the education of the next generation without being able to receive government assistance if they choose to accept it. Homeschooling, in addition to all its other benefits, is economically efficient. It wouldn't be out of line for the governments of other states to follow CA's lead and recognize that fact.
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Old 06-22-2010, 09:31 PM
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Oh and I have never said that other options should not be available (although I can see how it was could be implied when I reacted to the privledge comment). I've said things like the lines should not be blurred, pointed out the legal definitions etc.

I guess it just boils down to semantics. I would say options other than homeschooling, where many of you would say other homeschooling options.
I agree with this, and it has nothing to do with animosity towards those who use charter schools and the like. I just think that homeschooling is one thing, and a government school-at-home program is something else.

No matter what the issue, the government uses checks and controls when it hands out money. If some of you don't mind that....that's great for you. I mind it very much. Once again, the lines should not be blurred between you and me.
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Old 06-22-2010, 09:37 PM
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....I think it's unjust for families to have to undertake something as demanding and value-producing as the education of the next generation without being able to receive government assistance if they choose to accept it.
As long as the "government assistance" remains a choice, I don't have a problem with it.
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Old 06-22-2010, 09:46 PM
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I'm in favor of more options, not of an umbrella school requirement for all someschoolers. And I am sick to death of being treated like some kid of traitor or fake because I think it's unjust for families to have to undertake something as demanding and value-producing as the education of the next generation without being able to receive government assistance if they choose to accept it. Homeschooling, in addition to all its other benefits, is economically efficient. It wouldn't be out of line for the governments of other states to follow CA's lead and recognize that fact.

I don't think you realize that CA educational laws do not mention homeschooling at all. I hope no state follows CA lead in that.

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THAT SAID, the only reason I got within 5 miles of the K12 boxed curriculum that the charter school offered was that my child needed occupational therapy and I could not afford it.
I don't know what state you are in, but in most states your child would still be eligible for therapy through the school system no matter what. In fact I believe it is federal law that they can not deny such services.
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Old 06-22-2010, 09:47 PM
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I agree with this, and it has nothing to do with animosity towards those who use charter schools and the like. I just think that homeschooling is one thing, and a government school-at-home program is something else.

No matter what the issue, the government uses checks and controls when it hands out money. If some of you don't mind that....that's great for you. I mind it very much. Once again, the lines should not be blurred between you and me.
Exactly
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Old 06-22-2010, 10:05 PM
 
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I agree with this, and it has nothing to do with animosity towards those who use charter schools and the like. I just think that homeschooling is one thing, and a government school-at-home program is something else.

No matter what the issue, the government uses checks and controls when it hands out money. If some of you don't mind that....that's great for you. I mind it very much. Once again, the lines should not be blurred between you and me.
"School-at-home" Wouldn't that be kind of like....home-school? I'm really not seeing the clear-cut line there. Seems pretty blurry to me.

As an independant homeschooler this year, I'm still going to be doing exactly the same things as last year under the umbrella.

There are gov't checks and controls either way. Even independents have rules to follow prescribed by the gov't. Some states legally define homeschooling and some don't. Does that make a Washington homeschooler (gov't funded or not) any different from an Alaskan or Californian one? Can you really tell someone else that they're not "real" homeschoolers?

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Old 06-22-2010, 10:25 PM
 
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i thought this conversation was more-so in reference to gov't giving money to spend on curriculum you want, activities you want, etc. i'm all for that honestly. my state is already highly regulated, so keeping a portfolio and having accountability already exist for us. my state offers k12, connections academy, and calvert for *free*, but that's not appealing to me. i just want the money, lol. i don't want that kind of oversight, but i do agree that having it as an option for learning at home is great for the families that choose it. i consider those that enroll in such programs to be part of the homeschool community, regardless of their legal status. imho, it's totally irrelevant to the friendships that form, as we all school at home in our own unique ways.

i sooooo wish our state had the option to get some sort of financial assistance though. it would help us so much in getting to participate in the extra curricular things that we seem to never be able to afford. i also wish our state allowed homeschool students to take public school classes if desired. oh well.

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Old 06-22-2010, 10:57 PM
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"School-at-home" Wouldn't that be kind of like....home-school? I'm really not seeing the clear-cut line there. Seems pretty blurry to me.
She did not say school-at-home...She said government school-at-home program.
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Old 06-23-2010, 11:10 AM
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"School-at-home" Wouldn't that be kind of like....home-school? I'm really not seeing the clear-cut line there. Seems pretty blurry to me.
I suppose I left out a hyphen. Government-school-at-home is clearer, no?

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As an independant homeschooler this year, I'm still going to be doing exactly the same things as last year under the umbrella.

There are gov't checks and controls either way. Even independents have rules to follow prescribed by the gov't.
And in some states, the people have been actively fighting against and trying to change the rules for years. Some progress has been made.

In other states, there are no rules, no accountability, no requirements. It's not likely those states will start handing out vouchers willy-nilly, with no strings. In places where music, art, and phys. ed have been cut in the public schools, the state is not likely to give a homeschooler money to spend on karate lessons.

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Some states legally define homeschooling and some don't. Does that make a Washington homeschooler (gov't funded or not) any different from an Alaskan or Californian one? Can you really tell someone else that they're not "real" homeschoolers?
I'm concerned with my rights not being trampled by your wants.
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Old 06-23-2010, 11:37 AM
 
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I suppose I left out a hyphen. Government-school-at-home is clearer, no?
Sorry, still homeschooling so far as I'm concerned. Yeah yeah, you don't agree. We know. But you really can't continue to disagree with other people's opinions, as you've been doing in this thread. You're welcome to your opinions, but please stop telling other people that our opinions are wrong. It's not like this is a new issue to the homeschooling world, and arguing that there is some huge difference when you add the ebil gubermint into the official description of exactly the homeschooling method you're following doesn't actually change the fact that the children go to school at home, taught by their parents, with considerable flexibility in all aspects of curriculum and social life. Which, to me and to many others, could not possibly be considered anything except homeschooling.

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I'm concerned with my rights not being trampled by your wants.
Again, something that you keep saying. A few people have rebutted saying that options for government funding and lack of government oversight are not mutually exclusive, and have given examples of cases where dual systems already exist. You have ignored those comments, and just keep insisting that government funded homeschooling options would mean all sorts of awful things to your and your family. You haven't said what those things are, but they're obviously clear in your mind and you obviously feel very strongly about this. Which is fine. But not everyone agrees on exactly what your "rights" are here. What you consider to be your rights, others are perfectly justified in considering to be your wants. The SCOTUS has been pretty tight-lipped on homeschooling, and they're the final arbiters in the US of what exactly is a fundamental right, and what is not. They've already decreed that everyone has a fundamental right to a public school education.

I'd also like to point out that I'm not aware of any CA "homeschoolers" (air quotes, since technically, of course, there aren't any) who are unhappy with their current situation. The major complaint I've heard from the CA group is the pressure of having to come up with a school name that is cool, pertinent, and witty. I'm sure that there are some out there who whine about the online paperwork they have to fill out once a year, but nothing that I've read indicates that it is in any way burdensome.

And I'd like to repeat what I said earlier, that a recent conversation has shown that some people in this community actually support greater oversight for homeschoolers. Another something that you don't have to agree with, but this is an OPINION, and everyone is entitled to theirs.

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Old 06-23-2010, 03:04 PM
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Again, something that you keep saying. A few people have rebutted saying that options for government funding and lack of government oversight are not mutually exclusive, and have given examples of cases where dual systems already exist. You have ignored those comments, and just keep insisting that government funded homeschooling options would mean all sorts of awful things to your and your family. You haven't said what those things are, but they're obviously clear in your mind and you obviously feel very strongly about this. Which is fine. But not everyone agrees on exactly what your "rights" are here. What you consider to be your rights, others are perfectly justified in considering to be your wants. The SCOTUS has been pretty tight-lipped on homeschooling, and they're the final arbiters in the US of what exactly is a fundamental right, and what is not. They've already decreed that everyone has a fundamental right to a public school education.
Anecdotal evidence means little to me when the facts don't back it up.
I have actually done a good bit of research into HSLDA and the harm they have done to the homeschooling movement. In my research I have found many instance where legislation (both bills that have been signed into law and those that did not pass such as one that was struck down in GA) that provides homeschoolers with $$ or access to public school classes and/or activities also include increased accountability.
http://www.homeedmag.com/ and http://hsislegal.com/ both contain a good deal of information on the subject.


ETA: Many of which included increased regulations for all homeschoolers and not just those who wish to take advantage of what is being offered.
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