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#61 of 127 Old 06-23-2010, 04:05 PM
 
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Please do not take issue with other members on the thread. This topic has strong opinions on both sides, so in order to continue the discussion please be respectful in stating your opinions and don't get personal.

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#62 of 127 Old 06-23-2010, 05:11 PM
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Another something that you don't have to agree with, but this is an OPINION, and everyone is entitled to theirs.
Everyone? Including me, right?

I don't see where I said that others aren't entitled to their opinions. I merely disagree with certain opinions that others have, just like you disagree with mine.
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#63 of 127 Old 06-23-2010, 05:28 PM
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THAT SAID, the only reason I got within 5 miles of the K12 boxed curriculum that the charter school offered was that my child needed occupational therapy and I could not afford it. If I had had access to an umbrella school like they have in CA and several other states, then I would have gotten some help with at least one of my three academic expenses (curriculum, extracurrics, therapy) that would have helped me to be able to manage the others.
I finally thought to look for the info. Under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act your child can not be denied thearpy based on the fact he/she is not enrolled in a public school. http://idea.ed.gov/
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#64 of 127 Old 06-23-2010, 05:58 PM
 
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In other states, there are no rules, no accountability, no requirements. It's not likely those states will start handing out vouchers willy-nilly, with no strings. In places where music, art, and phys. ed have been cut in the public schools, the state is not likely to give a homeschooler money to spend on karate lessons.

I live in a state with extremely relaxed homeschooling laws. If you want to go completely Indy with your homeschooling experience, there's nobody to report to.

BUT, we have what seems to many of us a very good thing. Sign up with one of many distance ed schools, turn in a simple ILP, 4 samples per year, get your 3rd graders and above to yearly testing, and VOILA! Now you have $2000 to spend as YOU SEE FIT for every high schooler in your home (less for lower grades). No limits on how much of your funding can go for PE (we do karate and swim team), or art (we do Atelier, architecture and design), or just trips to the bookstore.

This is school money that we pay in property taxes already. The district running the program benefits, and we as parents and our children all benefit. My contact teachers are just there to file things.. That's it. They helped my 14yo with her decision to skip a grade, they signed her off on 8.5 credits last year, they accept credits in service learning, job shadowing, etc.

For many of us who are struggling to make our food budgets come together these days, this is really a nice worry off our minds...I know our paper, pens, supplies, books, science materials, etc., are all going to be taken care of.

And like I said, NONE of this is mandatory. I know several families who school independent of any program or resource...but most of them have found public school helpful for at least a few things over the years, and there we have the same issues all over again.

I agree, it's a wonderful thing to have choices, and I'm glad some of the money we already pay into the systems is going toward educating homeschooled children.
love, penelope

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#65 of 127 Old 06-23-2010, 06:43 PM
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I agree, it's a wonderful thing to have choices, and I'm glad some of the money we already pay into the systems is going toward educating homeschooled children.
love, penelope
It *is* a wonderful thing to have choices, and I'm glad your state has what appears to be a good system. I suppose all of our opinions are colored by our experiences.

This is not a homeschool friendly state, and we do not have any publicly funded programs like K12 here. If you want to homeschool, you are on your own....and if you are lucky you will live in a district with a superintendent who will not badger you for more than the law requires or threaten you with truancy. We still have the word "approval" written into our statute regarding homeschooling.

RI is the second most densely populated state in the nation. We have lousy schools, and highly paid teachers. We have lots of citizens who do not speak English, and a lot of illegals. We have an insanely high unemployment rate. There are a lot of people with their hands out, waiting for a buck. Believe you me, nobody is going to be giving homeschoolers money here without strings attached.

It was mentioned in another post that not all homeschoolers are against more oversight. That may be so. All I know is that I have been homeschooling my kids for ten years, in three different states and six cities, and don't know anyone who wants more oversight. I have been part of nationwide discussion forums for homeschoolers and unschoolers, and have never heard anyone lament the lack of oversight. What my school district asks me for is intrusive enough. I have to keep attendance registers, for Pete's sake.
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#66 of 127 Old 06-23-2010, 07:44 PM
 
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Ick. Even with no strings attached, it sounds horrible. Attendance sheets? Really? Um, yes they're at home today, check. It would suck to have to ask for permission to raise your kids. It sounds like you've got more restrictions in RI than most here who are under an umbrella. I got pissed and left the PP just because they wanted us to start listing hours, which I guess is kind of like attendance sheets. How am I going to separate all we do into hours? Who thinks these things up anyway?

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#67 of 127 Old 06-23-2010, 08:03 PM
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Who thinks these things up anyway?
We commoners can't possibly know what's good for us.
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#68 of 127 Old 06-23-2010, 08:27 PM
 
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It was mentioned in another post that not all homeschoolers are against more oversight. That may be so. All I know is that I have been homeschooling my kids for ten years, in three different states and six cities, and don't know anyone who wants more oversight. I have been part of nationwide discussion forums for homeschoolers and unschoolers, and have never heard anyone lament the lack of oversight. What my school district asks me for is intrusive enough. I have to keep attendance registers, for Pete's sake.
I live in Indiana, which is a pretty easy state to hs in, but I have to keep attendance records. Which I find pretty absurd I just write down in my lesson plans what cumulative number of days "attended."

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As long as the "government assistance" remains a choice, I don't have a problem with it.
Yes, absolutely.
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#69 of 127 Old 06-23-2010, 08:31 PM
 
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Ick. Even with no strings attached, it sounds horrible. Attendance sheets? Really? Um, yes they're at home today, check. It would suck to have to ask for permission to raise your kids. It sounds like you've got more restrictions in RI than most here who are under an umbrella. I got pissed and left the PP just because they wanted us to start listing hours, which I guess is kind of like attendance sheets. How am I going to separate all we do into hours? Who thinks these things up anyway?
We have to do this in PA. We keep track of what subjects we cover each day and tick them off. We have to keep a list of all books and materials used. We have to create a portfolio at the end of the year and the pay an evaluator out of pocket to pass judgment on it, and then even after we get the green light, we still have to turn the whole dang thing into the school district. We have to send in a notarized affidavit (paid with our money, of course) and a list of objectives and information about immunization status and physicals. And during certain years, we have to pay for standardized tests and send those results in as well. This year it cost over $100 for 2 standardized tests and evaluations. And this doesn't even begin to cover curriculum costs. It's ridiculous.

ETA: And this is just for "standard" homeschooling. I can't even begin to imagine what they'd want for an umbrella school. Blood samples?

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#70 of 127 Old 06-23-2010, 09:13 PM
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I live in Indiana, which is a pretty easy state to hs in, but I have to keep attendance records. Which I find pretty absurd I just write down in my lesson plans what cumulative number of days "attended."
My district sends out a four-page attendance sheet, on which we have to write in the weeks we're reporting for and check off what days (M-F) the child was "in school." Meaning, of course, that the whole thing is bogus because we don't follow the school calendar nor subscribe to the notion that learning only happens M-F.

With all the problems Providence schools have, I wonder how they have time to bother with us.
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#71 of 127 Old 06-23-2010, 10:38 PM
 
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Since my oldest homeschooler will be a Senior in August, I've been at this (in Alaska) for a long time.

There is a LOT of difference up here between homeschool programs (the distance ed ones, like IDEA). There's Chugach, Raven, IDEA, Cyberlynx... We used one that required REAMS of paperwork every quarter...was I glad to see the back of that organization!

On a very positive note, homeschooling parents got together to sort of "fight the system," and demand that 1) Religious curriculum be accepted as graded work, even though the school money still can't PAY for the religious parts of any curriculum, and 2) All the old rules about how much of our allotments we could spend on art/PE/music went out the window.

So now, many people (like us) have access to tons of HS stuff (I mean, I have over a dozen years and 5 kids worth of homeschool materials!), and just use our allotment for things like necessary new equipment, supplies, and PE/art/music lessons.

The very awesome thing about that is that FAMILIES did that. Parents got together and lobbied up here, and changed the entire draft of the law regarding what is called "distance education." I still get to choose what I want to teach, and what I want to use to teach it with, but I know I can spend all that allotment on PE (not hard to do with 5 in swimming/karate!) and art and piano.

I hope more parents in more states get together and follow the example of the parents who made Alaska so HS friendly. The problem is, we're all so busy actually parenting and schooling, that it's tough to find time to fight the good fight!

love, penelope

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#72 of 127 Old 06-24-2010, 08:51 AM
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Ick. Even with no strings attached, it sounds horrible. Attendance sheets? Really? Um, yes they're at home today, check. It would suck to have to ask for permission to raise your kids. It sounds like you've got more restrictions in RI than most here who are under an umbrella. I got pissed and left the PP just because they wanted us to start listing hours, which I guess is kind of like attendance sheets. How am I going to separate all we do into hours? Who thinks these things up anyway?

In Ga we have to send it monthly attendance sheets. It is no big deal. GA is a very easy state to homeschooling in. You just put an X for each day that you did school work so that you can verify that you are complying with the required 180 days a yr.
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#73 of 127 Old 06-24-2010, 12:08 PM
 
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In Ga we have to send it monthly attendance sheets. It is no big deal. GA is a very easy state to homeschooling in. You just put an X for each day that you did school work so that you can verify that you are complying with the required 180 days a yr.
This is basically what I have to do to "verify attendance" for our charter school. I have a calendar with the "official" school days highlighted for the month, and I just initial every day.
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#74 of 127 Old 06-24-2010, 02:53 PM
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Most homeschoolers that I know are against government funding for homeschoolers. Government money = government oversight. We want more freedoms, not less.
These are my feelings
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#75 of 127 Old 06-24-2010, 04:58 PM
 
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Ick. Even with no strings attached, it sounds horrible. Attendance sheets? Really? Um, yes they're at home today, check. It would suck to have to ask for permission to raise your kids. It sounds like you've got more restrictions in RI than most here who are under an umbrella. I got pissed and left the PP just because they wanted us to start listing hours, which I guess is kind of like attendance sheets. How am I going to separate all we do into hours? Who thinks these things up anyway?
okay, hours would definitely suck! lol. but attendance sheets aren't a big deal honestly. i have to keep a portfolio, attendance sheet, records of what we learn for those 180 days, progress reports, & i am mandated to cover specific subjects. it all sounds worse than it is though & honestly it's easy to navigate through. having said that though, now it's easy to understand why we don't school year round & take time off in the summer. hehe.

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#76 of 127 Old 06-24-2010, 06:36 PM
 
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While I fully understand a family choosing to go 100% independent with their homeschooling, I don't understand the vitriol and divisiveness toward parents who choose a publically-funded homelearning option.

As in: "WE must *draw a distinct line* between REAL homeschoolers and fake homeschoolers. WE are REAL homeschoolers, your kids are legally (gasp) PUBLIC school students and are totally unlike OUR "real" homeschooled children. Nevermind that we both pick out our own curriculum, cater to our children's learning styles, let them work at their own pace, do ALL the teaching and are with our kids all day every day. DRAW A LINE. You're *so* different from us real homeschoolers!

(Where's the puking emoticon??)

Sorry. This thread has really hit a nerve.
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#77 of 127 Old 06-24-2010, 06:53 PM
 
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While I fully understand a family choosing to go 100% independent with their homeschooling, I don't understand the vitriol and divisiveness toward parents who choose a publically-funded homelearning option.

As in: "WE must *draw a distinct line* between REAL homeschoolers and fake homeschoolers. WE are REAL homeschoolers, your kids are legally (gasp) PUBLIC school students and are totally unlike OUR "real" homeschooled children. Nevermind that we both pick out our own curriculum, cater to our children's learning styles, let them work at their own pace, do ALL the teaching and are with our kids all day every day. DRAW A LINE. You're *so* different from us real homeschoolers!

(Where's the puking emoticon??)

Sorry. This thread has really hit a nerve.
:

I think homeschooling is when you school at home. I could care less if boxed curriculum makes you feel better about how you teach, or if you get gov't money or your family is comfortable with complete unschooling.

The basic point of homeschooling for most of us (I think), is that we want to be our childrens' main teachers. We want to spend their days with them, know their friends, their influences, help shape and mould them and decide for our families what is right for us.

There are many right ways of doing most things that involve parenting of any stripe...right ways to birth, right ways to feed, right ways to train. And there are many right ways to educate our children.

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#78 of 127 Old 06-24-2010, 07:18 PM
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Personally, I do not care how you educate your children. My children are not more "real" than yours because we're independent homeschoolers.

The divisiveness you experience is because of a perceived and potential threat to homeschooling freedoms.

From HEM March-April 2008:

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[A] major difference between homeschoolers and public virtual school parents is that homeschoolers have worked long and hard to prevent unnecessary state regulation. Those who have ended up under such regulations continue to oppose them. By contrast, many parents of public virtual school students welcome regulations, saying that without certified teachers, state approved curriculum, and testing, they would not be confident they were doing the right thing or their children were going to be okay.

If we don't maintain the distinction between homeschools and virtual charter schools, the regulations put on public virtual school students may be put on us. It is ironic, sad, and could be tragic, that we homeschoolers, who started out to maintain our right to educate our children according to our principles and beliefs and not those of the state, could end up under greater government control than families who send their children to conventional public schools. The government could only directly regulate their children while they were attending school, leaving their homes free from government regulation, but it could regulate our children, and us, in our homes.

<snip>

It sets a precedent of government monitoring and overseeing private citizens in their own homes. Many people will inevitably gradually come to accept this kind of government intrusion and surveillance, even if it seems wrong to them at first. In addition, as determined as we homeschoolers are to maintain our homeschooling freedoms, once the precedent is set, we may find that as a small minority we cannot stem the tide. We may end up subject to some, if not all, of the oversight that students of public virtual schools face.
Once again, I don't care how you teach your kids. But if you're using public-school-at-home, I would just prefer that you call it that. I don't understand the need to call it homeschooling.
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#79 of 127 Old 06-24-2010, 07:26 PM
 
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While I fully understand a family choosing to go 100% independent with their homeschooling, I don't understand the vitriol and divisiveness toward parents who choose a publically-funded homelearning option.

As in: "WE must *draw a distinct line* between REAL homeschoolers and fake homeschoolers. WE are REAL homeschoolers, your kids are legally (gasp) PUBLIC school students and are totally unlike OUR "real" homeschooled children. Nevermind that we both pick out our own curriculum, cater to our children's learning styles, let them work at their own pace, do ALL the teaching and are with our kids all day every day. DRAW A LINE. You're *so* different from us real homeschoolers!

(Where's the puking emoticon??)

Sorry. This thread has really hit a nerve.
If it makes you feel better, while some people obviously do feel that you aren't "real" homeschoolers, I think that they are in the minority. I hope that it's not something that you run into in real life. It is pretty offensive when someone tells you how you should self-identify on any issue, particularly one that seems so common sense to the majority.

I'm kind of wishing that this thread would just die, because the only thing that's going to happen is more judging. Which angers me, too.

Trying to live a simple life in a messy house in a complicated world with : DH, DD (b. 07/07), DS (b. 02/09), and DD (b. 10/10)
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#80 of 127 Old 06-24-2010, 07:48 PM
 
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Please keep comments on the topic of receiving govt. funding for homeschooling and not on who is real homeschooler I know this gone a bit off track.

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#81 of 127 Old 06-25-2010, 05:37 PM
 
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When you receive government funding for your homeschool, you are essentially a public-schooled student with home-based instruction. Part of the state and federal funding goes directly to the school because your child is their student and part comes to you. Normal homeschooling laws no longer apply in this situation. You are bound to whatever rules the school you go through gives you. Most likely you will receive a teacher who oversees all of your work and may come to your home periodically to check on your children. Also if you have religious reasons for homeschooling, be aware that you may not use any tax funds to purchase religious curriculum.

I live in Colorado, and we are enrolled in a public school charter program or "umbrella" school. I consider us 100% homeschoolers, and our experience with the charter has been totally non-invasive and extremely supportive.

Religious materials are not allowed to be purchased with our yearly stipend. They buy everything else. We are secular, but really how much $ does one need to supplement their hs budget with religious materials? I don't think it's a problem for the many Christian hs-ers in our program.

We do have to do some testing--just entry/exit reading leveling and the "regular" CSAP crap for 3rd, 5th, 7th? I dislike that, but it would be required in our state regardless of our involvement in the charter or not.

There's no teacher who "watches" us or tells us what curriculum to use. We have a wonderful, supportive resource consultant who I bounce ideas off about curriculum. I am quite a researcher and she knows that I'm well-informed so she pretty much orders whatever I want for dd. She doesn't come check on us at our house---although she has been kind enough to bring materials over here when dh had the car or I when I was laid up in a difficult first trimester or my pregnancy. We do have to physically meet with her every month, but it's maybe 15 minutes or less and she mostly gives us free educational magazines, early readers, and tells us what a good job we're doing relatively painless. We do have the option of having these meeting at our house, which I appreciate and do not see as "them" trying to snoop into our business, but more our RC trying to accomodate her parents to make everything as easy as possible.

I know some of these umbrella-type programs have only certain materials or certain budget regulations on what the $ can be spent on, but ours is REALLY open as to what we can buy. I love our ps charter! We write a learning plan at the beginning of the year, and then any materials that fall under that plan and are non-religious can be approved for purchase. So we can buy a guitar for dd, mini-trampoline for PE, voice recorder to record her story-telling, plus I think they'll even buy desks/child-sized tables (but I always want to spend the $ on fun learning stuff, not furniture!).

Our charter was started by grass-roots homeschoolers and is now an official "school" in our district, this next year will be it's third year. So there's hope. I don't know how the families who prompted the initiation of the school went about it, but they were just hs-ers like us!

**eta--oh and they've NEVER asked to see samples of dd's work. Sometimes I want to share, but that is not part of our program. They're not about "checking up on us" but about supporting us. We log hours online, and apparently that's sufficient along with the CSAP stuff that the older kids do.

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#82 of 127 Old 06-25-2010, 05:59 PM
 
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I live in a state with extremely relaxed homeschooling laws. If you want to go completely Indy with your homeschooling experience, there's nobody to report to.

BUT, we have what seems to many of us a very good thing. Sign up with one of many distance ed schools, turn in a simple ILP, 4 samples per year, get your 3rd graders and above to yearly testing, and VOILA! Now you have $2000 to spend as YOU SEE FIT for every high schooler in your home (less for lower grades). No limits on how much of your funding can go for PE (we do karate and swim team), or art (we do Atelier, architecture and design), or just trips to the bookstore.

This is school money that we pay in property taxes already. The district running the program benefits, and we as parents and our children all benefit. My contact teachers are just there to file things.. That's it. They helped my 14yo with her decision to skip a grade, they signed her off on 8.5 credits last year, they accept credits in service learning, job shadowing, etc.

For many of us who are struggling to make our food budgets come together these days, this is really a nice worry off our minds...I know our paper, pens, supplies, books, science materials, etc., are all going to be taken care of.

And like I said, NONE of this is mandatory. I know several families who school independent of any program or resource...but most of them have found public school helpful for at least a few things over the years, and there we have the same issues all over again.

I agree, it's a wonderful thing to have choices, and I'm glad some of the money we already pay into the systems is going toward educating homeschooled children.
love, penelope
Ours is a lot like yours, spruce!

They pretty much do give us $ willy-nilly to support my kid's educational interests. It's great! She can take art classes, karate, music, whatever we want.

They are DEFINITELY NOT limiting our freedoms as to how to pursue dd's education, in fact I feel like it's exactly the opposite.

Yes, she's technically a student enrolled in our local school district, but instead of those ps $ funds going to the exact same PE or art or music or math program that every other ps kid in our district gets, we have the FREEDOM to CHOOSE what the $ allotted to her student status goes to support, and I love that How great! I wish all the other kids in the district got to do that, too.

I wish that all kids, public schooled or home-schooled could have the option that we have along with their parents of deciding exactly how to custom tailor their educations to suit their interests.

And I don't think that my girl being a "public school home schooler" is messing up any of the indy hs-ers plans that I know of. They very slight accomodations that we make to be enrolled in the district are okay with me, and maybe not for my indy hs friends, but we all get along and do our own thing and hs our kids as we see fit. I'm no threat to them just coz dd is lucky enough to have an annual budget for educational materials.

Let's adopt that same attitude here . . . there does not need to be a "clear cut dividing line" between those of us who use charters and those who choose not to do so. We are all doing the best we can with the resources available to us to support our children's education in whatever way works best for our families.

Now settle down and breathe, everybody!

Happy and in love with my family!
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#83 of 127 Old 06-25-2010, 06:11 PM
 
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I don't think you realize that CA educational laws do not mention homeschooling at all. I hope no state follows CA lead in that.
NJ is exactly the same. We are not recognized at all but not explicitly denied existence. Nothing is stated about homeschooling one way or the other. It's a double-edged sword.


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I don't know what state you are in, but in most states your child would still be eligible for therapy through the school system no matter what. In fact I believe it is federal law that they can not deny such services.
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I finally thought to look for the info. Under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act your child can not be denied thearpy based on the fact he/she is not enrolled in a public school. http://idea.ed.gov/
http://www.mothering.com/discussions...rchid=11918244

Without reading the links (partially because I had an entire graduate course on IDEA and SpEd law), I have to tell you that the idea that hsers are entitled by law to SpEd therapies is subject to interpretation. So while you might be RIGHT, you may also be in a state where you will need to hire a lawyer (and spend a lot of money) to prove that point. I know this because I live in just such a state (see the beginning of this post). AND, HSLDA will not take on cases about SpEd services--so that option is out (not that I recommend them in general, but I did look into them when I was looking for a lawyer). In the end, in MY case, the district caved. Not because I was entitled by any obvious laws, but because they were already lined up for legal action in our case because they had withheld services for 18 months during a time when my son's homeschool status was non-issue and were dumb enough to put two items in writing that hung them on this point. They withheld out of their complete negligence for identifying a program for him in a timely manner. By the time they got their act together, I refused to put him in a classroom program and they attempted to appease me to avoid my filing suit about their withholding for 18mo. Even then, I came (literally) within hours of meeting with a lawyer (that I was going into debt to afford) because they gave me such a hard time and downright bullied and harassed me over the whole thing.


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We commoners can't possibly know what's good for us.
Ugh... that mentality among our politicians is seriously my greatest pet peeve EV. AR! Someone ought to remind them that most of THEM were "Joe Public" once, too.

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#84 of 127 Old 06-26-2010, 02:20 AM
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Let's adopt that same attitude here . . . there does not need to be a "clear cut dividing line" between those of us who use charters and those who choose not to do so. We are all doing the best we can with the resources available to us to support our children's education in whatever way works best for our families.


It's not about who is doing "best". It's not about independent homeschoolers thinking they're better than those who use charters.

It has to do with lumping us all into one category. That sets a precedent where the educrats will quite possibly expect the same level of oversight for all of us.

I do not want to meet with anyone from the district.....EVER. For those of you who use charters and have monthly meetings with a teacher and don't see that as intrusive, GREAT! You don't see mandatory testing as invasive; wonderful! But you don't speak for ME, nor do you speak for a whole shipload of other homeschoolers. I totally am not interested in more red tape and being made to physically meet with some sort of "supervisor".

More and more people are turning to public-school-at-home every year. How long do you think it's going to be before state officials get tired of dealing with "these" homeschoolers and "those" homeschoolers and just try to streamline everything?
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#85 of 127 Old 06-26-2010, 10:45 AM
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It's not about who is doing "best". It's not about independent homeschoolers thinking they're better than those who use charters.

It has to do with lumping us all into one category. That sets a precedent where the educrats will quite possibly expect the same level of oversight for all of us.

I do not want to meet with anyone from the district.....EVER. For those of you who use charters and have monthly meetings with a teacher and don't see that as intrusive, GREAT! You don't see mandatory testing as invasive; wonderful! But you don't speak for ME, nor do you speak for a whole shipload of other homeschoolers. I totally am not interested in more red tape and being made to physically meet with some sort of "supervisor".

More and more people are turning to public-school-at-home every year. How long do you think it's going to be before state officials get tired of dealing with "these" homeschoolers and "those" homeschoolers and just try to streamline everything?

Thank you for saying so well what I have been trying to say this entire thread.
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#86 of 127 Old 06-26-2010, 01:23 PM
 
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More and more people are turning to public-school-at-home every year. How long do you think it's going to be before state officials get tired of dealing with "these" homeschoolers and "those" homeschoolers and just try to streamline everything?
As I wrote earlier, in our jurisdiction it's been 17 years so far and no one is trying to streamline anything. If anything there's a greater range of options, not less: the charter-type arrangements include an option which allows families to unschool freely and honestly.

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#87 of 127 Old 06-26-2010, 02:02 PM
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As I wrote earlier, in our jurisdiction it's been 17 years so far and no one is trying to streamline anything. If anything there's a greater range of options, not less: the charter-type arrangements include an option which allows families to unschool freely and honestly.

Miranda
That is absolutely wonderful, but you live in a different country than I do.
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#88 of 127 Old 06-26-2010, 02:19 PM
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That is absolutely wonderful, but you live in a different country than I do.
Yep...I've read the proposed legislation that has fortunately not yet passed in GA. It would changed the accountability for all homeschoolers in exchange for access to partial enrollment in public schools, access to PS sports and access to reimbursements for some materials.

When I first started homeschooling in 2001 I was very upset that there wasn't some type of assistance/funding. Then I started researching proposed legislation and new legislation in the US. In more cases than not the new or proposed regulations were across the board and not a new subset of the homeschooling laws.
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#89 of 127 Old 06-26-2010, 03:04 PM
 
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That is absolutely wonderful, but you live in a different country than I do.
But most people in this thread live in different states than you do. Homeschooling regulations vary state by state. My understanding of this thread was that it was discussing the situations in various different jurisdictions and drawing conclusions about general trends in governmental interference. If anything Canadians are more readily accepting of government interference in personal affairs than Americans. If a dual-track homeschooling system were to result in inevitable encroachment on the right to homeschool without any interference you'd expect to see that more readily in a Canadian province than a US state.

It sounds like Alaska and Washington state have similar scenarios to my province. Perhaps they're anomalies, having endured some sort of ideological and political contamination as a result of their proximity to BC.

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#90 of 127 Old 06-26-2010, 04:17 PM
 
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If you don't want the government to expect "the same level of oversight" for all types of homeschoolers/unschoolers/charterschoolers, then LOBBY for your goal.

Many homeschool parents fought long and hard up here to change the HS allotment rules, and there are independent homeschool "watchdogs" all over who make sure the rules stay the way they want them.

It doesn't mean we have to fight against one another, or draw lines in the sand separating the homeschool community into "Stars Upon Thars" and "No Stars Upon Thars."

I thought this community was about building bridges and understanding...not about divisiveness and labels. Labels are for canned food.

We're supposed to be a bag of mixed nuts.

love, and peace please,
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