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-   -   money to homeschool from government? (http://www.mothering.com/forum/50-learning-home-beyond/1236045-money-homeschool-government.html)

reignbelle 06-20-2010 10:11 AM

Hi I am in Michigan. I was recently talking to a friend of mine and she said someone told her that they receive money from the government to homeschool. Is this true? Would it be a grant, tax right off, or maybe a special group their in? Ive never heard of this and cannot find any info online. My frined wont be seeing the person anymore so I can not get anymore info form her. Thanks

CherryBomb 06-20-2010 10:28 AM

From what I understand, in Alaska the state helps pay for homeschooling, but other than that, IDK. I've been homeschooling for the last 2 years with no help from the gov't

Smithie 06-20-2010 11:38 AM

In some states, you can enroll in an "umbrella school" and receive a stipend to purchase curriculum materials of your choice from an approved list (and the approved list is sometimes quite extensive). I don't if you're technically homeschooling or technically not (I think it depends on the state), but if you are choosing the curriculum and teaching the child in your home, to me that's homeschooling. Weekly extracurriculars are also offered by some umbrella schools in a centralized "campus" location.

I *heart* umbrella schools. Unfortunately, I don't think Michigan has a state-funded umbrella school program. You might call up these folks and ask if they know anything about how to get state money for homeschooling: http://www.clonlara.org/

2xy 06-20-2010 11:40 AM

I don't know the deal in Michigan, but I do know that it's a high regulation state and it's possible that people receive some sort of funding if they register with an umbrella school or do some sort of accredited distance learning. Or maybe the family in question has a special needs child who gets state services.

Most homeschoolers that I know are against government funding for homeschoolers. Government money = government oversight. We want more freedoms, not less.

reignbelle 06-20-2010 12:22 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by 2xy View Post
I don't know the deal in Michigan, but I do know that it's a high regulation state and it's possible that people receive some sort of funding if they register with an umbrella school or do some sort of accredited distance learning. Or maybe the family in question has a special needs child who gets state services.

Most homeschoolers that I know are against government funding for homeschoolers. Government money = government oversit. We want more freedoms, not less.
I thought Michigan was low on regulations? Is there a website that has all that information. I thought Michigan didn't even have registration anymore. I differently don't want anyone over seeing our homeschooling because I plan on not following "regular" timetable.

Smithie 06-20-2010 12:44 PM

"Most homeschoolers that I know are against government funding for homeschoolers. Government money = government oversight. We want more freedoms, not less."

How nice for your family that you can afford to disdain government funding. Homeschooling is going to cost me at least a couple of thousand dollars this year, plus large amounts of time taking ds around to the various scattered places where he does extracurriculars that require a group of kids and/or expensive infrastructure. It would sure be handy if some of my property tax money would come back around to help my kid play soccer and take music lessonswith other homeschooled kids in our area.

Homeschooling should not be an option reserved for the economically privileged. (And I realize that dozens of people are now thinking about posting to explain how very poor they are and how much they sacrifice in order to homeschool without the corrupting influence of a government subsidy. Save it. If you can buy materials and stay out of the full-time workforce to teach your children, then you are a member of privileged class of independent homeschoolers, just like me.)

I couldn't care less if some families refuse a homeschool subsidy on principle, but it makes me nuts to think that MY efforts to to get just a little bit of MY tax money spent on the homeschooled children in MY community is made more difficult because the powerful voices at the national level of the independent/sectarian homeschooling movement are so very concerned with the theoretical, as-yet-undemonstrated risk that their family's particular experience will be compromised if homeschooling becomes an economically feasible option for families with fewer resources.



Obviously I have some strong feelings about this. I'm still not over that lady on a local message board who seemed to really think that our state's new K12 charter school was part of Satan's master plan to destroy all our souls. Something tells me that she won't be signing up for an umbrella school anytime soon, even if we were so lucky as to get one.

fruitfulmomma 06-20-2010 01:01 PM

Quote:
I thought Michigan was low on regulations? Is there a website that has all that information. I thought Michigan didn't even have registration anymore. I differently don't want anyone over seeing our homeschooling because I plan on not following "regular" timetable.
When you receive government funding for your homeschool, you are essentially a public-schooled student with home-based instruction. Part of the state and federal funding goes directly to the school because your child is their student and part comes to you. Normal homeschooling laws no longer apply in this situation. You are bound to whatever rules the school you go through gives you. Most likely you will receive a teacher who oversees all of your work and may come to your home periodically to check on your children. Also if you have religious reasons for homeschooling, be aware that you may not use any tax funds to purchase religious curriculum.

AAK 06-20-2010 01:12 PM

Here is WA state, you can receive funding. We have a couple options. One is through a virtual school. If you enroll full time (you become a ps alternative education student) you can spend $1200 per child per year. You have the option of choosing how to spend it (just no religious curriculum). You can use it towards curriculum, piano lessons, fieldtrips, etc. You can maintain your homeschooling status buy registering as a 90% student or whatever. The amount goes down proportionally. In WA, if you do this, you do submit monthly progress. But otherwise things don't really change. I have heard very good things about the program--considering it myself. They even have area coordinators that create fieldtrip opportunities that might not be available without a group.

amy

alegna 06-20-2010 01:13 PM

We have some public school-at-home types of charters here where yes, you can get money. BUT your kids learn what they say on their schedule and still have to do standardized testing (and to a large extent still have to follow the school calendar) Doesn't work for me, but I have no problem with it being an OPTION. As long as it remains an OPTION and not *the* way to homeschool I'm all for it.

-Angela

eclipse 06-20-2010 01:29 PM

In California (and I'm sure some other states), there are homeschool charter schools in many areas that help pay for curriculum and extra curriculars. Students enrolled in these are technically public school students, but I also consider them homeschooled kids. The charter my kids are enrolled in have a list of curriculum we can choose from for free, but we are not bound to use things off that list. We can also petition for the school to purchase additional curriculum for us for free (I'm working on getting them to buy RightStart math for us for next year) and I've heard it's generally approved unless it's ridiculously expensive or religious (because state funds can't be used for religious materials). They have weekly classes and clubs that are free and optional (my kids did art classes, math club, current events, etc) and also host for fee classes like Mad Science and Lego classes. We also get something like $70/mo that can be used for things like the for the for fee classes on campus, sports/music/foreign language/art classes from independent teachers, educational websites, field trip fees, etc. They offer a lot of field trips throughout the year (optional) anmd subscriptions to a lot of for fee educational websites like Discovery Streaming and Brainpop. In return, they expect us to do yearly state testing starting in grade 2 and have monthly meetings with an educational consultant that basically just records what we have done and plugs it into the state standards for grade level.

So, there are pluses and minuses. For my family, right now, the pluses outweigh the minuses.

jeteaa 06-20-2010 02:02 PM

Here in WA we have parent partnership programs (PPP) where the student is enrolled w/ the school district as a percentage, so you retain your hs status. You then receive a stipend ($1,750/yr) to spend on approved materials and classes. You also have to have a lesson plan of 20 hrs/week and have contact w/ a teacher every week. You can not spend the stipend on anything religious or "high risk" such as sky diving for PE.

reignbelle 06-20-2010 02:03 PM

Thanks for the speedy replies. I've learned a lot.

yippityskippity 06-20-2010 02:28 PM

We've used two charters in CA. One was very much public school at home (UGH!) but the current one is fabulous. We get around $1,000/yr per child for secular curriculum and activities. In exchange we meet with someone from the school once a month for about 15 min. Every semester we hand in one work sample per subject (language arts, math, social studies, science) for a portfolio.

While at our current charter we've basically unschooled DD and encountered NO interference or problems from the charter.

Legally, she's a public school student. Socially she's a homeschooler.

Actually, in California - from a legal standpoint - I don't think homeschooling exists. You're either a private school student (file the PSA), tutored by a credentialed teacher or go through a public charter. (I'm sure someone will correct me if I've missed something )

TEAK's Mom 06-20-2010 04:47 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by CherryBomb View Post
From what I understand, in Alaska the state helps pay for homeschooling, but other than that, IDK. I've been homeschooling for the last 2 years with no help from the gov't
The state of Alaska does not help pay for homeschooling. There are a number of small, rural districts that run distance education programs (much like the charter programs in Washington and California). These programs are available to students statewide and do provide funds for curriculum and activities. This increases funding for the rural districts because what they pay out to students is less than they receive per student. The students are considered to be enrolled in those districts and are officially public school students subject to school regulations and standardized testing.

By and large, this is a mutually beneficial arrangement. The funds help families afford to teach their children at home and the extra funds benefit the rural districts. That said, families who use these programs are subject to a great deal more oversight than they otherwise would be. Alaska's homeschool laws are some of the most relaxed in the nation if a family chooses to homeschool independently.

I'm not sure anyone really cares about this, but I wouldn't want anyone to be confused.

2xy 06-20-2010 04:51 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Smithie View Post
How nice for your family that you can afford to disdain government funding. <snip> If you can buy materials and stay out of the full-time workforce to teach your children, then you are a member of privileged class of independent homeschoolers, just like me.)
Thanks, but in ten years of homeschooling, I've almost always held employment of at least 30 hours a week, outside the home. So, spare me the "how nice for your family." I also live thousands of miles away from any relatives, and homeschooled through a divorce as well.

I live in an intrusive, high regulation state. I can only imagine what sort of hoops we'd have to jump through if we got money from the state, too.

elizawill 06-20-2010 06:30 PM

i would love some money from the government personally. it wouldn't effect how we homeschool at all, as i'm already in a high regulated state and either meet or surpass state standards. i'm a wee bit jealous of the ladies that post here every year asking for help in how to spend all that $$. as napoleon dynamite would say, "luuuuucky".

ocelotmom 06-20-2010 07:01 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Smithie View Post
Homeschooling should not be an option reserved for the economically privileged. (And I realize that dozens of people are now thinking about posting to explain how very poor they are and how much they sacrifice in order to homeschool without the corrupting influence of a government subsidy. Save it. If you can buy materials and stay out of the full-time workforce to teach your children, then you are a member of privileged class of independent homeschoolers, just like me.)
You may want to consider addressing this in a less universal and aggressive manner, as it puts even those who may happen to at least partially agree with you on the defensive, and less willing to consider your points.

I'm not going to get into detailed discussion of my family's finances in a public forum, but trust me, we are NOT in a privileged class, except to the extent that we're white people raised in middle class families in the United States. We've chosen to forgo most of the things typically deemed "essential" by those in the privileged classes in order to pursue a lifestyle in line with our values, which includes homeschooling our children.

We've also had to compromise on aspects of their education, because, at this point, we simply can't afford most extracurriculars and outside classes. We still feel that this compromise is "worth it" over sending them away all day to public school.

I have no doubt whatsoever that there are those who really are similarly not particularly privileged who still choose not to compromise their standards about government interference. More power to them.

As it happens, I don't have any problems with taking "government funding" for school. We were enrolled in a public school independent study program this year (which did not provide funds or useful curriculum), and if we were remaining here next year we'd definitely be doing a charter school that provides funds in order to give the kids more opportunities.

But realistically, the amount of money offered by these charters isn't enough to make a major difference for a disadvantaged family. It allows such a family who has chosen to homeschool to offer more educational opportunities for their child, which is a great thing, and may help a disadvantaged family feel that they can provide what they want for their child, but it isn't going to help with housing, putting food on the table, or the other things that are necessary for survival. And those are the big stumbling block for many families, not the ability to buy expensive curriculum or pay for extracurriculars.

chaoticzenmom 06-20-2010 07:22 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Smithie View Post
.....


Obviously I have some strong feelings about this. I'm still not over that lady on a local message board who seemed to really think that our state's new K12 charter school was part of Satan's master plan to destroy all our souls. Something tells me that she won't be signing up for an umbrella school anytime soon, even if we were so lucky as to get one.
LOL, Smithie! That woman must have really angered you!

We just pulled out of a PP program that gave us just enough (500/yr/child) to help pay for music lessons. They had free classes, but those were more "state standards" type things that I didn't want to use.

They really did add new requirements each year. It's that slippery slope that so many people talk about. When the gov't gives you money, they do tell you what to do with it. I look at it like foodstamps, only for education

I think I'm going to stay independent this year, but I'm wondering if I'm just being too proud. My kids could have so much more if we had that stipend. All I"d have to do is to fill out that stupid form each month saying that I'm following all the states rules and regulations. It's not easy to decide either way.

So, yeah, in some states you can get money. Look at your local school district's websites and see if they have alternative programs or homeschool programs. Some school districts take students from other districts into their homeschool programs, so check all of the districts around you to see what they have. Different districts give different amounts. Jetae and I are only miles apart and she gets much more than I got, apparently from a different district. They also all have different requirements. Some want weekly progress, some want monthly. Some want hours listed in various ways. Some want bi-yearly teacher meetings, some want weekly phone calls.

Theoretica 06-20-2010 09:05 PM

I just want to gently mention that homeschooling does NOT need to be an expensive venture. I've homeschooled for well over a decade, including high school, and have NEVER spent that kind of money. I'd be happy to share our general yearly 'school' spending if that would help you any?

chaoticzenmom 06-20-2010 09:08 PM

That's true, Theoretica. Most of the stuff I used the gov't money for was extra-curricular stuff that I would have spent even if the kids were in a brick school. Gymanstics, piano, soccer, etc.

reignbelle 06-20-2010 09:41 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Theoretica View Post
I just want to gently mention that homeschooling does NOT need to be an expensive venture. I've homeschooled for well over a decade, including high school, and have NEVER spent that kind of money. I'd be happy to share our general yearly 'school' spending if that would help you any?
yes please!

"That's true, Theoretica. Most of the stuff I used the gov't money for was extra-curricular stuff that I would have spent even if the kids were in a brick school. Gymanstics, piano, soccer, etc."

this is mostly true for me. dd wants to start ballet, I want to take the kids to museums, I'd like to do some historic travel. I will admit to loving to buy books but have firmly committed to the library!Mainly the money would be for things that are diffently normal outside of school activities. I will just have a greater opportunity to do them timewise with homeschool . My area is Very low in homeschoolers and her area is high so that maybe the difference. I cant find anything local. We don't even have local community classes and the homeschool group is over a half hour away.

luv-my-boys 06-20-2010 09:44 PM

if they are a military family they might be speaking of some programs for AD children stationed overseas, but these progrmas are run by the individual branches funding. I dont have too much info on it as we havent needed it yet but I know some other active duty families have gotten stipends to purchase curricula when DOD schools didnt exist or were too full.

Theoretica 06-20-2010 10:15 PM

Well I don't think there's any programs that give gov't funding in our state, but here's a general breakdown of our expenses each year. I'm sure I'm forgetting something so this isn't an iron clad expense sheet, but you'll get the idea. There's NO way I'd spend thousands on homeschooling. None. Also keep in mind a lot of the memberships would be things we'd get anyways, but homeschooling lets us take better advantages of their offerings :

Annual Memberships This is the biggest 'must have' for our family, as it opens us up to their special events and classes throughout the year. Plus it's an awesome way to take advantage of a small area we're studying without having to 'cram it all in' on one day's trip.

$85.00 (Zoo)
$75.00 (Children's Museum-Educator Discount)
$50.00 (History OR Art museum, depends on the year)
$65 (Nature Center)

One sport per kid per 'season':
$50-$75 per sport per kid (if they want). We had three kids doing this for many years, this year it's only one kid but the rule is the same. Also, the rule of thumb is approximately $200 per kid per year for sports. But we encourage them to try lots of different sports to see what they really like, and if they get hooked on something they are welcome to keep at it as their sole sport. Even when all three older kids were 'in something' we didn't spend more than about $200 per sports season-rarely even close to that-and I'd say about $400/year at most. More frequently it's a local public sports team that is $$30-50 for the season, so $125 per kid per YEAR is a much more accurate 'max'.

Music/Instrument:
I only have one kiddo really interested in music lessons (violin). That costs $80/month although she takes a break for summer and christmas-so probably only 9 months out of the year. I teach them all some basic piano myself. If they ever care enough to take formal lessons we'd definitely look into it as well. There are MUCH cheaper violin lessons available in our area, but she has talent so we're opting for lessons through the first chair violinist w/the symphony. Until we were sure though, we did the cheaper lessons at $25/month.

Classes and Co-Ops
I try to have them in quite a few classes that fit their interests. Some examples are:
$75 Dissection Lab
$125 Summer CSI Camp
$60 Science classes at the children's museum
$75 Behind the Scenes classes at the Zoo
$35 Creative Writing Club/Class

And then there's the free stuff:

Library clubs/events (we plan our calendar around the libraries in the four surrounding towns!)
Field Trips with local HS group
Tours
Local/community events
Seasonal events

For homeschool books/materials/supplies/whatever I spend about $100/year at the local homeschool used book sales that are held at the end of the traditional school year. Most of that money comes from selling what I'm no longer using, but it's not a die hard rule. We use the internet A LOT and that's a HUGE help towards lowering the 'need to buy it' list. HUGE.

So total expense on the HIGH end of our annual budget is....$1755 (just ballparking the above expenses on the high end). This year, for example though, it's the memberships, one kid in a $35 sport + violin, the science and zoo classes, and her creative writing class is free. Oh and I only spent $25 at the book sale this year because after HSing all these years I pretty much have everything.

So (without a calculator) I'm ballparking this year's expenses at about $1200, or $100/month ($80 of which is usually violin). And that's doing EVERYTHING she wants to do. We could easily cut back here and there if we needed to. And, from my experience, having more kids homeschooling only increases the cost by a couple hundred so it wasn't like it doubled/tripled the expense.

And keep in mind we're a single income, lower middle class family. So we're nothing CLOSE to privileged.

Hope that gives you some ideas

ETA: And, if anyone really wants to get nitpicky with the amounts, we'd do the memberships and sports and music lessons even if we weren't homeschooling (care to rework my math for me ). If we couldn't afford them, then having them in school wouldn't change that yk? So it's hardly a 'homeschool expense'. So taking THOSE out of the equation makes it MUCH more realistic. And I guess I could add in paper/ink expense for printing but that's maybe $40/3 months for two cheap cases of paper (with coupon and on sale!) and we get ink refills at Walgreens for $10 each every other month. And basic supplies like crayons/markers/etc but I'd wager most houses have all that, homeschooling or not.

fruitfulmomma 06-20-2010 10:45 PM

My primary list of things I'd *like* to get for the year comes out to about $1000, not including memberships to zoos and museums which my father pays for and which as Theoretica pointed out aren't really a school vs. homeschool issue (and free days are available at the ones around here). *Most* of these things are non-consumables and therefore would not need to be purchased again.

If I whittle that all down to absolute needs, I could get away with spending less than $100. That would include 3 handwriting books @ $7.99 each, 2 verbal math books @ $10.00 each, and the rest would be spent on paper, crayons, pencils, etc... which I usually get at Target at super cheap prices right at the end of their back-to-school sales.

Last year we spent about $100 for some Kumon Math and Preschool workbooks, plus another $200 on science books, flash cards, and paper and pencils.

Smithie 06-21-2010 10:48 AM

"Most of the stuff I used the gov't money for was extra-curricular stuff that I would have spent even if the kids were in a brick school. Gymanstics, piano, soccer, etc."

I think I spent $500 on the books I wanted for kindy and 1st, but they are almost all reusable. I might spend $50 on books for the next first grader who comes along.

The big money is spent in extracurrics (some of which I'd continue if I used a brick-and-mortar school, but not all) and copays on services that would be provided for free in a public school, like occupational therapy. We probably spent more like 3k last year if you count in the OT copays (at which point we decided we simply couldn't afford more OT), but even with that behind us, a pretty bare-bones schedule of co-op and lessons is going to push us over the 2k mark by the end of the 1st grade year.

I don't mind spending the time and the money on this totally-independent homeschooling venture, but yes, I think it's a function of my class privilege that I can do so, and yes, I think there would be great benefits to my family and incalculable benefits to other families less fortunate if my area had an umbrella school that offered extracurrics, therapy and a curriculum stipend. I think that the ability to homeschool would be extended to a broader range of people, and that working moms would be able to leverage the assistance of their extended families who may not be comfortable with "teaching" but are very able to help out with "driving" and "waiting."

LauraLoo 06-21-2010 11:30 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by 2xy View Post
I don't know the deal in Michigan, but I do know that it's a high regulation state and it's possible that people receive some sort of funding if they register with an umbrella school or do some sort of accredited distance learning. Or maybe the family in question has a special needs child who gets state services.
I didn't see this get clarified for the OP; Michigan is a low reg. state - no reporting, no testing, and you don't even have to register your intent.

However, in MI you can still participate in non-core curriculum classes and be eligible for special ed services. In this case, you do need to register with the state.

OP - there is info. on the MI Department of Ed. site --
http://www.michigan.gov/mde/0,1607,7...175---,00.html

This doc. gives a good overview:
http://www.michigan.gov/documents/Info2005_132227_7.pdf

sha_lyn 06-21-2010 11:54 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Smithie View Post
"Most homeschoolers that I know are against government funding for homeschoolers. Government money = government oversight. We want more freedoms, not less."

How nice for your family that you can afford to disdain government funding. Homeschooling is going to cost me at least a couple of thousand dollars this year, plus large amounts of time taking ds around to the various scattered places where he does extracurriculars that require a group of kids and/or expensive infrastructure. It would sure be handy if some of my property tax money would come back around to help my kid play soccer and take music lessonswith other homeschooled kids in our area.

Homeschooling should not be an option reserved for the economically privileged. (And I realize that dozens of people are now thinking about posting to explain how very poor they are and how much they sacrifice in order to homeschool without the corrupting influence of a government subsidy. Save it. If you can buy materials and stay out of the full-time workforce to teach your children, then you are a member of privileged class of independent homeschoolers, just like me.)

I couldn't care less if some families refuse a homeschool subsidy on principle, but it makes me nuts to think that MY efforts to to get just a little bit of MY tax money spent on the homeschooled children in MY community is made more difficult because the powerful voices at the national level of the independent/sectarian homeschooling movement are so very concerned with the theoretical, as-yet-undemonstrated risk that their family's particular experience will be compromised if homeschooling becomes an economically feasible option for families with fewer resources.



Obviously I have some strong feelings about this. I'm still not over that lady on a local message board who seemed to really think that our state's new K12 charter school was part of Satan's master plan to destroy all our souls. Something tells me that she won't be signing up for an umbrella school anytime soon, even if we were so lucky as to get one.
Your efforts to get the government to pay for you to homeschool your own children will likely hurt all homeschoolers in the future. With government $$ comes government regulations. You might not care about having to answer to the government on the educational choices that you make, but that does not mean that all homeschoolers want to give up that right. It is not theoretical or undemonstrated.

We are not privilege. In fact last payday we had $35 left after paying bills. My husband gets paid every 2 weeks.

I couldn't care less about what you want. What I care about is allowing homeschoolers the freedom to homeschool their children without government interference.

Oh and BTW, Charter schools such as K12 are not homeschooling. They are public school.

2xy 06-21-2010 01:07 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraLoo View Post
I didn't see this get clarified for the OP; Michigan is a low reg. state - no reporting, no testing, and you don't even have to register your intent.
Sorry, I must have gotten Michigan mixed up with another state. Either that, or things in Michigan have relaxed over the years.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sha_lyn View Post
Your efforts to get the government to pay for you to homeschool your own children will likely hurt all homeschoolers in the future. With government $$ comes government regulations. You might not care about having to answer to the government on the educational choices that you make, but that does not mean that all homeschoolers want to give up that right. It is not theoretical or undemonstrated.

We are not privilege. In fact last payday we had $35 left after paying bills. My husband gets paid every 2 weeks.

I couldn't care less about what you want. What I care about is allowing homeschooelrs the freedom to homeschool their children without government interference.

Oh and BTW, Charter schools such as K12 are not homeschooling. The are public school.
Thanks for this. I was too lazy to respond with all that. Plus, I had to take my privileged self to my job yesterday and didn't have time to mess around on here anymore.

chaoticzenmom 06-21-2010 01:16 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by sha_lyn View Post
Your efforts to get the government to pay for you to homeschool your own children will likely hurt all homeschoolers in the future. With government $$ comes government regulations. You might not care about having to answer to the government on the educational choices that you make, but that does not mean that all homeschoolers want to give up that right. It is not theoretical or undemonstrated.

We are not privilege. In fact last payday we had $35 left after paying bills. My husband gets paid every 2 weeks.

I couldn't care less about what you want. What I care about is allowing homeschooelrs the freedom to homeschool their children without government interference.

Oh and BTW, Charter schools such as K12 are not homeschooling. The are public school.
You know, I hear that all the time. I was with the Parent Partnered school and my kids were considered full-time students of the district for about 2 years. They were still were home with me everyday, playing video games,sleeping in, etc. Legally, they were PS students, but they absolutely were homeschoolers. It irks me for other people to try to define our experience. I understand why independant HSers want the legal definition, but it's just that...a "legal" definition. It's not a definition of what happens in our home. Seriously, my kids are at home and educated here, so call it whatever...but it's homeschooling.

lach 06-21-2010 01:25 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by sha_lyn View Post
Your efforts to get the government to pay for you to homeschool your own children will likely hurt all homeschoolers in the future. With government $$ comes government regulations. You might not care about having to answer to the government on the educational choices that you make, but that does not mean that all homeschoolers want to give up that right. It is not theoretical or undemonstrated.

We are not privilege. In fact last payday we had $35 left after paying bills. My husband gets paid every 2 weeks.

I couldn't care less about what you want. What I care about is allowing homeschooelrs the freedom to homeschool their children without government interference.

Oh and BTW, Charter schools such as K12 are not homeschooling. The are public school.
I feel like we just had this conversation, and it came out that not all homeschoolers are against more regulation. Please keep in mind that homeschoolers are not all of one mindset about all things, including issues relating to homeschooling, including government oversight. Saying "I don't care what you want, I only care about what I want" and also insisting that others also only care about what you want seems not terribly conducive to having a conversation.

I also do not agree with your restrictive definition of homeschooling. There are many people in this community who use K12 and similar programs and consider themselves homeschooling families. And since their children receive their education at home, it's hard for me to see how they could not be considered homeschoolers. Again, this issue is not defined by you and you alone.


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