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Old 08-01-2010, 04:45 AM - Thread Starter
 
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My son (9.5) is not interested in learning cursive beyond a signature. He seems to be able to read cursive for the most part. I'm curious if anyone else has just "skipped" cursive with their kids. When I think of all I want them to learn, and prioritize it, cursive doesn't seem very important to me (esp if it's not important to him). He is, on the other hand, eager to do a typing program so he can use the keyboard w/o hunting and pecking
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Old 08-01-2010, 12:03 PM
 
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IMO it's important to be able to read cursive, and sign your name. It's not important to be able to write in lovely cursive.

However, it is nice to have a way to write that is faster and more relaxed that straight up and down manuscript. I am having our sons learn the "modern manuscript" style. It's similar to D'Nealian or the Barchowsky styles...an italic print that can be joined if you want to.

I want to do this for them because my dad would only hand-write in all caps (using large and small caps but still all caps) that were straight up and down. It was slow and an effort for him. His preference was to type everything and he had typewriters scattered through our house. He typed things most people would never have imagined taking the trouble to type, because it really was easier for him - and these were old manual typewriters. I used to think it was quirky but now I think it's sad that he found it so difficult to write by hand. I want to give our sons a way to write by hand that is easy for them.

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Old 08-01-2010, 05:38 PM
 
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I personally feel that learning cursive is important. It's very important to know how to read cursive and it's fairly important to be able to write in cursive. I've seen adults who do not know how and it's very time consuming to for them to write anything by hand and it's a bit of a handicap to not be able to read it, almost to the point of being a type of illiteracy. It would also be tough for an adult to advance in many careers without penmanship skills.

My dad teaches at a middle and high school level in a private school. He has had several students who transfer in from public schools and are unable to read or write cursive. He writes all his outlines and handouts in cursive script and those students who have been unable to read them are forced to have someone (usually their parents) 'translate'. They are also frequently unable to keep up with note taking because printing is generally more time consuming. This may not be an issue while homeschooling but could be a real problem in college and in adult life. I can't imagine how much time I would have wasted since I was a child if I was only able to print!
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Old 08-01-2010, 06:04 PM
 
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I personally feel that learning cursive is important. It's very important to know how to read cursive and it's fairly important to be able to write in cursive. I've seen adults who do not know how and it's very time consuming to for them to write anything by hand and it's a bit of a handicap to not be able to read it, almost to the point of being a type of illiteracy. It would also be tough for an adult to advance in many careers without penmanship skills.

My dad teaches at a middle and high school level in a private school. He has had several students who transfer in from public schools and are unable to read or write cursive. He writes all his outlines and handouts in cursive script and those students who have been unable to read them are forced to have someone (usually their parents) 'translate'. They are also frequently unable to keep up with note taking because printing is generally more time consuming. This may not be an issue while homeschooling but could be a real problem in college and in adult life. I can't imagine how much time I would have wasted since I was a child if I was only able to print!
I don't understand the idea that cursive is faster to write than printing. I can print very fast, and although I learned cursive in school, it seems so laborious and slow. The only thing I ever write in cursive is my signature.

I'm trying to imagine the scenario where lacking the ability to write in cursive could hinder a person's career. Really? I've worked in various demanding, interesting fields, and I've certainly never been asked to write in cursive. On the contrary, we live in the 21st century, when typing skills are paramount. If the OP's son is interested in learning to type, I would absolutely encourage that rather than insisting on an obsolete form of communication.
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Old 08-01-2010, 10:21 PM
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I think whether writing cursive is faster or not is individual, to some extent. It's faster for me, but my husband chooses mostly to print and that's faster for him, uppercase block letters, at that - probably because his early career involved a lot of architectural drafting. We've never had a race to see if his printing or my cursive is faster. His block printing doesn't seem laborious or slow.

I think it's still important to learn to read and write cursive, because it's a mode of communication still in use in our society. It's not totally archaic yet. Reading it is arguably more important than writing it. I can't imagine very many situations where not being able to write it well would be that much of a problem if one is able to print quickly, comfortably and legibly, but writing cursive is a good way to learn to read it. I would personally feel handicapped if I was unable to write cursive, but much more so if I was unable to read it. I want my kids to learn it well enough that they can do it if they choose or if it's necessary for some reason, but basic proficiency is good enough IMO.

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Old 08-01-2010, 10:53 PM
 
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My now 16yo son, refused to learn how to write cursive. He can barely sign his name. But that is by choice. He was public schooled up till the 6th grade and was unschooled for half the 6th and half the 7th grade.
We have talked about his "signature" and he prefers to print his name.
That is ok with me....as he is old enough to choose what he wants to do. I think that we should allow the child to decide what he or she wants to learn.

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Old 08-01-2010, 11:25 PM
 
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Some of these adults that cannot write in cursive or only write in print have undiagnosed fine motor skill issues or other learning disabilities.

My dad is dyslexic his atrocious writing was a way to "cover up" an unforgiving school system.

We have a friend that is a physical therapist. She is amazed at how many of her patients and 30 something friends that have fine motor skill issues.

I do find that learning to write, there for read, helps aid in reading the variety of fonts in our world.

Since I have a kid with motor skills issue learning to write in cursive was developing that skill.

If you son doesn't want to learn please evaluate his motor skills. His lack of desire might be an hidden issue. Or it could be that he just doesn't want to learn. Boys are more prone to fine motor skill issues.

Have you looked into calligraphy?
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Old 08-02-2010, 03:40 AM
 
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My 10.5 yo son has dysgraphia and dyslexia. Printing is hard enough for him despite 2 years of occupational therapy for handwriting. So I'm just going to teach him to read cursive and to sign his name and otherwise he prints and will type. Because of his learning issues, typing will be a boon for him. Now if I can just get him interested in that!

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Old 08-02-2010, 03:42 AM
 
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Originally Posted by kindchen View Post
I don't understand the idea that cursive is faster to write than printing. I can print very fast, and although I learned cursive in school, it seems so laborious and slow. The only thing I ever write in cursive is my signature.

I'm trying to imagine the scenario where lacking the ability to write in cursive could hinder a person's career. Really? I've worked in various demanding, interesting fields, and I've certainly never been asked to write in cursive. On the contrary, we live in the 21st century, when typing skills are paramount. If the OP's son is interested in learning to type, I would absolutely encourage that rather than insisting on an obsolete form of communication.
Scenarios:
A)
A young man or woman is taking a college class. There is a pop quiz and students are asked to grade each other's papers while the professor goes over the test (this happened most every day for me in college chemistry which is why I use this example). The cursive-illiterate student has to ask the person who exchanged test with them what each word says. It's both embarrassing and disruptive. It could, in theory, cause the student's grade to be lower if the professor didn't like the constant interruptions. It could also play out as a student being unable to participate in a study group because the students exchange papers for proofreading and some of the other students have chosen to handwrite, rather than type, their rough draft (I did this frequently in college since I had to walk quite a ways to a computer lab to print anything as I didn't have a printer in my dorm room).
B)
The student has now been hired by a local business. In a group of employees the new employee is given a handwritten memo. The employee must ask someone else to read the memo to them because they don't know how to read cursive script. The employee is now looked upon as less than intelligent and is eventually passed over for promotions.
C)
The employee gets a new job as an executive assistant. They do lots of tasks such as running errands and planning the logistics of meetings. One day they are asked to write up some quick place cards for a business lunch. After they are written in print the boss asks that they be redone in script so as to look nicer for the new clients coming in. The employee cannot write in cursive and must either admit it or quickly find someone else to do it.
D)
The employee is now is this meeting and is handed a list by the boss. The boss tells the employee to go fetch these items quickly. The employee cannot read the cursive the note is written in, cannot find anyone to translate it, and must admit to the boss that they never learned how to read cursive. It would take a really nice boss to keep someone like this on their payroll in the business world.
E)
A student decides to become a teacher and is unable to correct work turned in by students who write in cursive. Parents complain that their child's homework takes too long because the teacher insists it must be printed.
F)
This isn't regarding school or a job but can you imagine receiving a formal invitation and not being able to read it? Any time an adult who does not know how to read cursive or can only read it with much trouble is in a situation where they have to read it, especially in front of others, they will be embarrassed and be viewed as uneducated.

I know these are all really specific situations but they are to illustrate that knowing how to read and write cursive is an important and not yet antiquated skill. Learning typing skills is very important but so is cursive.
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Old 08-02-2010, 06:26 PM
 
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My 8 yr old DD can do cursive writing but I don't teach it or expect it. She barely does well at writing in manuscript. She hates writing and gets bored very easily. I will take what I can get at this point, lol.

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Old 08-02-2010, 07:07 PM
 
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Personally, I think cursive is outdated. I see less and less of it being used - yes, sometimes on invitations or fancy signs, but rarely do I see it used at any length and I feel that it is no longer the norm for informal handwritten notes. And thank goodness; although I had the full course of cursive instruction in school, I find it very tiresome to decode people's cursive handwriting. If they must write by hand, I greatly prefer printing. When I see a page written in cursive, my first reaction is "how old-fashioned, wish they'd just typed it because it's going to take me twice as long to read this".

I learned cursive in school, but as soon as I was allowed to, I stopped using it. I find printing to be faster and easier on my hand (if I hand-write too much I get pains) and the results to be more legible.

As it gets easier and easier to print out typed text, I think we will be seeing less and less handwriting of all types. More and more students are taking notes on their laptops now, and most assignments are typed. Having nice cursive handwriting will only be an important skill in a small number of jobs.

I want my kids to learn how to read cursive writing, but I don't think it's important for them to learn how to write it if they aren't inclined to. I think learning to type is a much more important skill. I may have to argue with dh over this though...
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Old 08-02-2010, 07:09 PM
 
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Yep we skippied it, later she got interested in calligraphy. But it would have been fine if she never did. But we are unschoolers.
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Old 08-02-2010, 07:34 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elus0814 View Post
Scenarios:
A)
A young man or woman is taking a college class. There is a pop quiz and students are asked to grade each other's papers while the professor goes over the test (this happened most every day for me in college chemistry which is why I use this example). The cursive-illiterate student has to ask the person who exchanged test with them what each word says. It's both embarrassing and disruptive. It could, in theory, cause the student's grade to be lower if the professor didn't like the constant interruptions. It could also play out as a student being unable to participate in a study group because the students exchange papers for proofreading and some of the other students have chosen to handwrite, rather than type, their rough draft (I did this frequently in college since I had to walk quite a ways to a computer lab to print anything as I didn't have a printer in my dorm room).
B)
The student has now been hired by a local business. In a group of employees the new employee is given a handwritten memo. The employee must ask someone else to read the memo to them because they don't know how to read cursive script. The employee is now looked upon as less than intelligent and is eventually passed over for promotions.
C)
The employee gets a new job as an executive assistant. They do lots of tasks such as running errands and planning the logistics of meetings. One day they are asked to write up some quick place cards for a business lunch. After they are written in print the boss asks that they be redone in script so as to look nicer for the new clients coming in. The employee cannot write in cursive and must either admit it or quickly find someone else to do it.
D)
The employee is now is this meeting and is handed a list by the boss. The boss tells the employee to go fetch these items quickly. The employee cannot read the cursive the note is written in, cannot find anyone to translate it, and must admit to the boss that they never learned how to read cursive. It would take a really nice boss to keep someone like this on their payroll in the business world.
E)
A student decides to become a teacher and is unable to correct work turned in by students who write in cursive. Parents complain that their child's homework takes too long because the teacher insists it must be printed.
F)
This isn't regarding school or a job but can you imagine receiving a formal invitation and not being able to read it? Any time an adult who does not know how to read cursive or can only read it with much trouble is in a situation where they have to read it, especially in front of others, they will be embarrassed and be viewed as uneducated.

I know these are all really specific situations but they are to illustrate that knowing how to read and write cursive is an important and not yet antiquated skill. Learning typing skills is very important but so is cursive.
All but one of these is about reading cursive, not writing it. Both of my older kids can read it intuitively - without any formal instruction in it. As for option C, the only one requiring writing it, plenty of professional people have horrible handwriting - even if any given employee could write in cursive, it doesn't mean they would be able to do it beautifully enough for a task like that - it's likely that begging off with "I have horrible handwriting" would be just fine in that situation.
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Old 08-02-2010, 07:36 PM
 
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IMO 'reading' cursive is much easier than writing it. DS who has horrid handwriting can read almost anything but get him to write it and you are just plain out of luck. However he is a wonderful artist - go figure.

As a teacher most of my students turn in typed work, I work in classrooms from 5th grade up.

My own son is homeschooled and typing is his preferred method as well. He can type much quicker than he can write.

My own handwriting has changed over the years and if someone asked me to make placecards for a meeting you can be assured no-one would be able to read them, unless they were printed. I would hope there was time to run them off on my printer using a suitable font.

Again those are just my opinions and your mileage may vary.

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Old 08-03-2010, 01:02 AM
 
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If it were me, I'd do both--typing and cursive. I can't imagine not knowing how to write in cursive--and yes, in general, it is faster than printing. Also, yes for business correspondence... especially thank you notes following an interview... it is still considered important. (While many will email a thank you note these days, a hand-written thank you note does set an interviewee apart.)

DH is a physician, and there's no way he could ever take the time to hand write all of the patient notes he takes during a history. While some hospitals have the option of computer-entry, not all hospitals do--or you're stuck using a standard form which may/may not work for the patient and their symptoms.

OK...now I'm going to sound like a snob...

I also firmly believe it's something an educated person should know. To be honest, if I had an employee who could not write in cursive (or read cursive), I would truly wonder about their intelligence and schooling. They may be able to overcome this through their output, but still--it would take time. Just as I have less respect for people who write in "TXT"... or do not know how to spell or use proper grammar. Call me a snob, but it irks me that I'll pay an agency thousands upon thousands of dollars for advertising--and then I have to spend my time correcting the grammar.

Regardless of whether or not your son chooses to write cursive as an adult, he still should be taught how to. To me, even if you think it obsolete, it shows respect for the English language. In many cultures (and remember the economy is becoming much more global), one can be judged on the neatness of their writing. I experienced this in quite a few European countries as well as the Middle East.

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Old 08-03-2010, 01:04 AM
 
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I think I need to leave this thread alone before I get really flustered over it. I will say that to me it would feel like a disservice to my children to not teach them how to read and write in cursive. Saying that cursive writing is not worth the time because a child doesn't want to do it (what child wants to practice handwriting??) or because a child is able to type faster (who can't type faster than writing by hand?) is like saying that math is not worth the time because a child doesn't enjoy it and is able to do the problems faster with a calculator.
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Old 08-03-2010, 01:09 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by umsami View Post
If it were me, I'd do both--typing and cursive. I can't imagine not knowing how to write in cursive--and yes, in general, it is faster than printing. Also, yes for business correspondence... especially thank you notes following an interview... it is still considered important. (While many will email a thank you note these days, a hand-written thank you note does set an interviewee apart.)

DH is a physician, and there's no way he could ever take the time to hand write all of the patient notes he takes during a history. While some hospitals have the option of computer-entry, not all hospitals do--or you're stuck using a standard form which may/may not work for the patient and their symptoms.

OK...now I'm going to sound like a snob...

I also firmly believe it's something an educated person should know. To be honest, if I had an employee who could not write in cursive (or read cursive), I would truly wonder about their intelligence and schooling. They may be able to overcome this through their output, but still--it would take time. Just as I have less respect for people who write in "TXT"... or do not know how to spell or use proper grammar. Call me a snob, but it irks me that I'll pay an agency thousands upon thousands of dollars for advertising--and then I have to spend my time correcting the grammar.

Regardless of whether or not your son chooses to write cursive as an adult, he still should be taught how to. To me, even if you think it obsolete, it shows respect for the English language. In many cultures (and remember the economy is becoming much more global), one can be judged on the neatness of their writing. I experienced this in quite a few European countries as well as the Middle East.
Great response!!

If nothing else cursive writing is an indicator that a person is well educated. I agree with you fully, it makes me think twice about what a person has written if the grammar is incorrect or the handwriting is sloppy.
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Old 08-03-2010, 11:54 AM
 
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I think people don't realize that pretty handwriting isn't just a matter of effort or education. I have horrible handwriting. I never learned cursive well. But not for lack of trying!!! I got straight A's in school except for handwriting. I always got C's in handwriting. I was taught over and over. I was sent to a separate area of the room to do copy work to try to give me more practice. When I got older I tried all different styles and practiced and practiced because I hated that my writing wasn't pretty like my friends' writing. But you know what, it still is just ok, certainly not pretty. If I want it to be at all decent i really have to concentrate. My printing is much better, and easier for me, compared to my cursive. And to imply that someone had a poor education or is less intelligent because they don't have attractive handwriting really bugs me.
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Old 08-03-2010, 01:56 PM
 
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ktgrok: I didn't mean to offend you. There's a difference between having poor handwriting but having been taught nonetheless and never learning. I've worked with plenty of people who don't like their handwriting, and thus prefer to print or whatever. That's a big difference to me than saying, "Well, I didn't want to learn cursive, so I didn't." or "I don't know how to write cursive." With the first statement, I would wonder what other areas the person "didn't want to learn"--and thus may be deficient in. With the second, yes, I would wonder what sort of school they went to that didn't even try to teach them. Those are not the same as somebody who at least tried to learn, and for whatever reason, simply never had very clear writing.

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Old 08-04-2010, 03:21 AM
 
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I was "taught" cursive in public school. I say "taught" because, although it was forced upon me, I was never able to really learn. I honestly think my brain is just not wired for it. I get the concept, obviously. I can remember most of the letters (and the ones I don't are simply from disuse-- I can recognize them if I need to read it.) The problem for me was actually putting it into practice. It was NOT faster for me to write in cursive. My brain stumbles over connecting those letters. It may be a learning/ motor-skill disability of mine. I have awful handwriting, in any case. I can do pretty well if I try *extra* hard, but my natural script is something you might expect out of a 10-year-old boy.

Honestly, the absolute only time I use cursive is for my signature. And my signature is not pretty. It's definitely unique-- but not pretty. If I try to take the time and write each cursive letter neatly and legibly, then I invariably jumble it all up. I'm simply missing that connector, I'm afraid.

My eldest daughter seems to be a bit delayed in the handwriting/ reading/ spelling department. She's 7½ and probably does many of those things on the level of an advanced public school kindergartner. Obviously I would like to teach her cursive at some point (once we have mastered the basics) but I fear she may have some of the same issues with it that I did. At which point I will probably adopt the mindset of "offer it, don't push it." She needs to know how to recognize the letters and how to create her own signature. Beyond that I think it's a personal preference how she writes her own notes and such.

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Old 08-04-2010, 03:22 AM
 
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Originally Posted by ktgrok View Post
I think people don't realize that pretty handwriting isn't just a matter of effort or education. I have horrible handwriting. I never learned cursive well. But not for lack of trying!!! I got straight A's in school except for handwriting. I always got C's in handwriting. I was taught over and over. I was sent to a separate area of the room to do copy work to try to give me more practice. When I got older I tried all different styles and practiced and practiced because I hated that my writing wasn't pretty like my friends' writing. But you know what, it still is just ok, certainly not pretty. If I want it to be at all decent i really have to concentrate. My printing is much better, and easier for me, compared to my cursive. And to imply that someone had a poor education or is less intelligent because they don't have attractive handwriting really bugs me.
I fully agree.

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Old 08-04-2010, 04:20 AM
 
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Honestly, besides my signature, the only thing I've ever been asked to write in cursive since we learned it in elementary school was an honor code on the SATs. (Which was embarrassing, because I was dead last to finish out of the group, but seriously, it was one test) And this was about a decade ago, so they may have changed that now too. Nobody in college used cursive that I remember, in fact, you got docked if your papers were not typed. When we learned cursive in 3rd grade they assured us that from that point forward everyone would expect us to do everything in cursive and it simply wasn't true. We learned it and then lost it. Almost everything is done on computers now, and any sort of formal work will almost certainly be expected to be typed. I did have a job that required hand writing for triplicates, or various sales contracts. The most important thing was that they were legible- and in my experience most peoples print is far more legible than their cursive. I also find printing is faster- I would NEVER have kept up with my notes if I wrote them all in cursive. Actually, my grandmother writes notes in cursive that are impossible to decipher, not because they are in cursive per say, but because something about cursive makes people completely fail to form their letters at all. You can make out the first letter of the word, and then its a line with the occasional bump. My parents signatures are the same way. I think, if he can read it and write his name, he's good to go. Its possible one day he'll want to learn if his career or artistic interests take him there, but I don't think its a life skill thats is going to be used very often.
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Old 08-04-2010, 05:15 AM
 
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And to imply that someone had a poor education or is less intelligent because they don't have attractive handwriting really bugs me.
Thank you for saying this. My son (who has dysgraphia as well as dyslexia) may very well struggle with a bias such as this when he is older. Which would be a shame in part because he is so intelligent and creative.

Smart people with dyslexia can struggle with spelling as well. My husband does. But he's a professional with a college education and he does just fine.

The use of a computer with spell check is a very helpful accomodation for people with these learning differences.

While it's true that this is a prevalent bias, a personal bias isn't a very convincing argument in support of a position. For example, someone could say:

Fat people should lose weight because I think fat people are lazy and unattractive.

People shouldn't homeschool their children because when I hear someone has been homeschooled, I assume they are unsocialized weirdos.

Parents shouldn't make their kids wear worn hand-me-downs, because when I see a kid wearing them, I think the family must be poor and lower-class.

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Old 08-04-2010, 12:48 PM
 
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If this was mentioned already, sorry. But what about Italics? It's similar to cursive in that the letters are joined to make it flow better but the letters are the same as their printed counterparts, unlike cursive and why so many don't like cursive. Many more hsers are using this now instead of cursive. There are handwriting books teaching it and even free on-line instruction.

I've told my kids they have to be able to read cursive and I show them the basics but beyond that, they just need to be able to write legibly. I encourage them to do their own version of writing that still joins the letters which is more similar to italics but still has a few cursive letters in there.

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Old 08-04-2010, 01:10 PM
 
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hmm. i've never really put much thought into this question. personally, my kids will both learn cursive, but whether or not it's necessary? i would probably be in the "no" camp. i know many adults (educated adults) that write like chicken scratch. i've never equated their terrible penmanship to lack of education, let alone questioned if they could actually even write in cursive. i can't imagine how that would even come up or be my concern. i agree that knowing how to read cursive penmanship is very necessary, but writing it? i think you could get by in life just fine without any issues.

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Old 08-04-2010, 02:45 PM
 
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Oubliette--What about your exams in college? Didn't you use blue books and such and write your exams? Or did you have a major that required absolutely no essays and such?

Mom to DS(8), DS(6), DD(4), and DS(1).  "Kids do as well as they can."

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Old 08-04-2010, 03:12 PM
 
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Oubliette--What about your exams in college? Didn't you use blue books and such and write your exams? Or did you have a major that required absolutely no essays and such?
I'm not Oubliette, but I am one of the folks who never cared for cursive. I learned it in school, but I used it only when required.

My professors in college never had any trouble with my printing. I never felt that I couldn't write quickly enough on exams.

I'm teaching my kids Getty-Dubay Italic. I see no reason why they need to know how to write traditional cursive.

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Old 08-04-2010, 03:18 PM
 
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Yep, we used blue books, but no one cared if we printed or wrote in cursive. In fact, I had one teacher that told us that he preferred we print, because printing is easier to read (because of what was mentioned above about some people completely forgetting to actually form letters when writing quickly in cursive). If cursive is faster for some people, that's fine, but it isn't for everyone. It happens to be faster for me when I'm taking notes or something like that that only I have to read, but if I'm writing quickly for someone else to read, I'll almost always choose to print - it's more standardized and more likely to be legible. I can write beautifully in cursive, but to make it both beautiful and legible, it takes a lot longer than just printing.
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Old 08-04-2010, 05:30 PM
 
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I'm teaching my kids Getty-Dubay Italic. I see no reason why they need to know how to write traditional cursive.
I don't believe that one has to know a traditional cursive--I'm not arguing for Spencerian script or anything. Italics are fine (Getty-Dubay, D'Nealian, etc.)... because in the later grades, the letters are joined and you do have a form of cursive. (It's referred to as cursive as well.) I think in many ways, they make a lot more sense in teaching as the transition is much easier. http://www.allport.com/Catalog_Produ...28&prodid=1787 But yes, I do believe that children should be taught a form of cursive--be it italics or not.

Mom to DS(8), DS(6), DD(4), and DS(1).  "Kids do as well as they can."

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Old 08-04-2010, 06:42 PM
 
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Oubliette--What about your exams in college? Didn't you use blue books and such and write your exams? Or did you have a major that required absolutely no essays and such?
I am currently in college and yes I have to essays and even use blue books (although they really seem like wasted paper to me!) and professors ask you to print. And often say if you do write in cursive it has to be AMAZING otherwise they won't be able to read it.

Also many exams are administered on computers and you type the essays.

I, for one, think there is no need to learn to write in cursive. I only ever sign my name and really it can't be called real "cursive" because its entirely illegible.

I think even Martha Stewart would agree that using your computer and a nice font would be better than most people's cursive for making place cards. (someone mentioned that upthread as a reason to learn cursive)

And if we are talking about someone who is 9 now, imagine what offices and work will look like in 10-15 years! Somehow I doubt they'll be handed tons of cursive written memos. The liability of handwriting a MEMO is huge, you need a paper trail, you'll get it as an email, (directly to your brain and you'll click on the links it by blinking your eyes) but I digress!
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