Gifted Homeschoolers- Deciding the Grade Level - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
Old 08-23-2010, 05:48 AM - Thread Starter
 
PennyP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: On the web
Posts: 103
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Cross posted in "Parenting the Gifted Child".

I'm keeping my son at home. At least for the foreseeable future. He's turning 3 in 2 weeks.
I was shopping yesterday for workbooks to do with my son and also a birthday present for him, and I couldn't decide what age range to gear it for. Do I get the workbook that is for 3-4 year olds that he could pretty much do it all right now? Do I get the workbook that is for 4-5 year olds that he'd definitely be able to do 85% of it right now? Or do I get the post kindergarten workbook (labeled "going into first grade") geared towards kids at 5-6 that he could definitely do the beginning and much of the middle and work his way through the book until he reaches the more advanced stuff at the end?

And when it comes to presents, if they're educational games, do I get him something that is right for a 3 year old or for older kids? He is capable of doing so much more than the typical 3 year old that I almost feel it is a waste of time and money to get something for his age if it won't actually be an educational tool because he knows it all already.

I'm a borderline unschooler, but I wanted to ask you homeschooling moms- when deciding on a curriculum, how do you decide what age to go for with your gifted kids?
The stuff meant for his age would be beneath his level, but I'm not sure the older aged things would be suitable for him for emotional reasons. (His age appropriate fears would cause him to be afraid of stories written for older kids, most probably.) And his dexterity isn't above average for his age, so certain things he'd be intellectually capable of, he isn't physically capable of handling. (He can't button his buttons himself and still holds a pen/pencil/crayon funny, even though he is able to draw complex pictures and write words.)

In the end, I got him a game for his birthday that contained many games with many levels of difficulty and it was meant for ages 3-7, and I got him the kindergarten workbook after sitting down with him in the store and saw that he definitely could easily do at least the first 10 pages of it now before his 3rd birthday.


So, how do you decide what age level is appropriate for your kid, especially if his intellectual ability isn't in sync with his physical or emotional skills.
PennyP is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 08-23-2010, 08:43 AM
 
jenfl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 2,000
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by PennyP View Post
So, how do you decide what age level is appropriate for your kid, especially if his intellectual ability isn't in sync with his physical or emotional skills.
I think you do what you did and make an educated choice by actually looking at the materials instead of going by the "grade level". I think that's the point of homeschooling -- you can choose what's appropriate for your child instead of being stuck in with the average. If you kid is ahead in one area and behind in another, you personalize.

I never look at those age guides. I just look for material my child is ready for and will enjoy. I don't know why you'd buy something that some stranger said was for "meant for his age" instead of something I knew they would get use out of.

Jen, former sys admin and current geek , wife to DH , SAHM and Montessori homeschool teacher to DD "Nugget" (05/07) and new arrival DS "Sprout" (03/31/10)
jenfl is offline  
Old 08-23-2010, 09:08 AM - Thread Starter
 
PennyP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: On the web
Posts: 103
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by jenfl View Post
I never look at those age guides. I just look for material my child is ready for and will enjoy. I don't know why you'd buy something that some stranger said was for "meant for his age" instead of something I knew they would get use out of.
Sometimes the packaging doesn't tell you enough about the level of difficulty or exact details about the thing you're buying, so all you have to go on sometimes is the age level written...
PennyP is offline  
Old 08-23-2010, 10:39 AM
 
Jennifer3141's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Traverse City, MI
Posts: 4,042
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I frequently get both types of supplies for my children who do have a medical label of "gifted" - both in vastly different skill sets.

I get books that will stretch them and books they can whip through and laugh about to give them more confidence. And then I switch them and give them the opportunity to teach each other.

I've also made it very clear to my children that the grade means nothing, it's simply a guide.

secular classical-ish mama to an incredible 5 year old DS and an amazing 6 year old DD.
Jennifer3141 is offline  
Old 08-23-2010, 11:24 AM
AAK
 
AAK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Eastern Washington
Posts: 3,090
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
Ignore the labels--get what is right for YOUR child. At that age, I would probably get the one that you said 85% would be easy. Just for it to be fun. Also, it is a great boost of confidence for the young ones to know a lot!

amy

Mom to three very active girls Anna (14), Kayla (11), Maya (8). 
AAK is offline  
Old 08-23-2010, 04:44 PM
 
Callimom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 2,914
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I think it depends on what your educational goals are and what kind of kid you have.
I'm not a big workbook fan especially for younger kids but if you have one of those kids who likes them and you want to give them confidence and get them into a routine of doing these then I would pick something that they will succeed at but which has a bit of challenge to it - unless the lack of challenge will completely turn off your kid.
If you are hoping that workbooks will provide the spine for his education I would move towards concepts he hasn't covered.

I say this gently - most 3 year old boys, regardless of intellectual level, are not going to get much from a workbook. Developmentally they are experiential learners, physically they are often still developing the fine motor skills and if the content is not new to them and/or you are going to have to do the writing component for them then why bother unless you have other educational goals.
If you are looking for some kind of academic structure to your day, you might try something like Come Sit by Me or Five in a Row which are literature and activity based and supplement it with some non fiction reading on the topic.

hth
Karen

Blessed partner to a great guy, and mama to 4 amazing kids. Unfortunate target of an irrationally angry IRL stalker.

Holding on to anger is like grasping a hot coal with the intent of throwing it at someone else; you are the one who gets burned. ~ Buddha

Callimom is offline  
Old 08-23-2010, 05:19 PM
 
One_Girl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 4,668
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 35 Post(s)
I looked into the material and chose things based on where she was at not what the grade level was. I didn't do a lot of structured stuff outside of math because it wasn't necessary. I used the district standards to make some of my decisions as far as the scope of our activities to make sure I hit everything on her grade level in math, but we also went for a deeper understanding when she showed an interest in a subject. For a kid so young I think that just continuing what you are doing without workbooks is fine. If he is interested in numbers or reading then introducing some fun play based lessons may be enjoyable. Workbooks are great tools but I think they should be used in moderation.
One_Girl is offline  
Old 08-23-2010, 09:43 PM
 
kanga2roo's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 201
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
When our son was that young we didn't use any school books. We bought him tons of regular books whenever we could, and let him choose almost anything. We continue to add to our home library, and now that he's seven have an awesome collection of books.
At that young age you might try open ended toys that will let him create and do however he wants. Wooden unit blocks and a block building book, Quadrilla, good musical instruments. Little ones, no matter how intellectually advanced still need to spend lots of time developing their whole body, imo. I know my son gravitated towards some things, but I am glad now, looking back, that we deliberately guided him towards things he could DO more fully.
You might want to check out Handwriting without Tears. They have a good preschool/kindy program. Read to him and expose him to everything you can ( zoos, museums, outdoor spaces, art materials, good music, quality toys). You could always create some sort of work baskets with cool "work" such as lacing, puzzles, paint mixing stuff, whatever....Would that work for him? What are your goals for him this year?
kanga2roo is offline  
Old 08-24-2010, 01:57 AM
 
OkiMom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 5,391
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I ignore the ages a lot of the time. Its hard because I live where a lot of what I get has to come from online, buying online can be a headache. If I find a set of books we really like then Ill buy the whole series and just work through them at her pace.
As for games ages don't mean much. I have everything from games for 2 year olds to games that are suppose to be 6 and above and my girls love all of them. THey are 3 and 21 months. I find that if they won't understand all the rules I can easily alter them or throw out part of them. For example I have a game where you are suppose to be going around Magic Kingdom (my oldest loves mickey and minne so she loves this game) visiting attractions, well part of it is to follow these cards for extra challenges/helps. Since neither reads and seemed to be confused about the cards I dropped the cards and now we just visit the attractions together.

~Heather~ Mama to Miss E (1/07), Miss A (11/08), Mr.T (2/11) and Miss A (10/12) Expecting our newest blessing sometime late Sept/early Oct.. Wife to my Marine since 11/2005
OkiMom is offline  
Old 08-24-2010, 02:19 AM
Dar
 
Dar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: St. Louis, MO
Posts: 11,249
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Karenwith4 View Post
I say this gently - most 3 year old boys, regardless of intellectual level, are not going to get much from a workbook. Developmentally they are experiential learners, physically they are often still developing the fine motor skills and if the content is not new to them and/or you are going to have to do the writing component for them then why bother unless you have other educational goals.
I agree. There are so many other ways to learn with 3 year olds that are more developmentally appropriate, provide more educational benefit, and are just more fun. IMO, most workbooks for young children are more about giving them something to do to keep them busy and occupied (which makes them useful for things like waiting for a meal to be served in a restaurant) and developing fine motor skills (which can be frustrating when kids really aren't ready).

Lillian has a couple nice pages about homeschool activities for preschoolers and young children - here and here.

I think games are another story - assuming they're fun games. I knew a 3 year old who ruled at Apples to Apples, which is marked "Ages 12 and up" (we played the regular version, not the junior one). Well, actually I thought he picked his dad's card too often, but he certainly could play and play well... with a group that included a number of other players both far younger and far older than 12. As long as he's not physically or mentally too frustrated by the game, why not?

At three or four, Rain loved a lot of the Gamewright games... Rat-a-Tat-Cat, Slamwich... I think she was a little older when we got Frog Juice, which she adored for years.

 
fambedsingle1.gifSingle mom to Rain (1/93) , grad student, and world traveler earth.gif


  

Dar is offline  
Old 08-24-2010, 11:34 AM
 
accidental_hs'er's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 79
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
So, how do you decide what age level is appropriate for your kid, especially if his intellectual ability isn't in sync with his physical or emotional skills.

I have struggled with this in the past. For us it is getting easier as my son gets older.

My ds was reading Magic Treehouse books by his 4th birthday. Even now he is about 6-7 grades ahead of his school age with reading and comprehension. At 7 1/2 he still can't ride a bike (awkward mobility and fear) and writing is a huge chore. I've spent years wondering how far to let him go and how fast.

For games and toys I have always ignored the ages on the box. I go with interest and could care less what the manufacturer suggests. Books were an issue too. Just because he could read long historical books doesn't mean he was ready to learn about the holocaust. For subjects like math, I just let him progress at his own pace without pushing. That means we are probably at grade level or a little behind in math because he hates book work. I know when we sit and discuss math with him he has a fabulous comprehension and could whip through it quickly but getting pencil to paper is still a fight I haven't really fought yet. He gets a little better on his own as time goes by. This year we are trying out an online program and think that he will move along much faster since he is pretty good at typing and loves all things computer related.

Subject wise, ds pretty much decides where he goes. I don't have a prescribed curriculum so subjects like history or geography just happen. Like if he is interested in oceans, he learns about oceans. How far he delves into it is out of my hands. It can be as simple as learning the names to how ocean currents effect weather or marine microbiology. I never know where we'll end up.

I find my gifted kid is really easy to unschool and have a feeling that might be typical. I can't stop this kid from taking stuff in. I just work with his less refined fine motor skills and keep an eye out for things he isn't emotionally mature enough for and run with it.
accidental_hs'er is offline  
Old 08-24-2010, 12:11 PM
 
elizawill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: right here
Posts: 5,262
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
my nephew is also very gifted. he enjoys all levels of toys and such (even ones that are meant for younger kids). so we just focus on buying what he wants, as we figure he'll enjoy that the most. he has a lot of electronic toys that are very advanced & he especially loved building elaborate train sets when he was 3 (watching youtube tutorials in how to make them run backwards, etc). he's older than 3 now, so of course he can choose now for himself, but even as a toddler, he knew well enough what he wanted my sister to buy and was rather vocal about it. so i'd trying going that route.

homeschooling mama to DD 10 & DS 7 blogging.jpg

elizawill is offline  
Old 08-24-2010, 02:07 PM
 
kgianforti's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 766
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by PennyP View Post
I'm a borderline unschooler, but I wanted to ask you homeschooling moms- when deciding on a curriculum, how do you decide what age to go for with your gifted kids?
I always have a variety of levels available and ready to go especially in math and science - where my big girl seems to make leaps and bounds in. Even if you have stuff at a higher level and aren't using it, it's there. That way you're not placing frantic orders at Rainbow Resources because your kiddo finished everything you had for them in math!

I don't call us "unschoolers" but we school relaxed, child led with curriculum.

ETA: if you start using actual curriculum for math, most places offer placement tests too.

ETA #2: agreement with accidential hs'er - you can't stop these kids from taking EVERYTHING in and progressing rapidly, which is why unschooling works so well. Just make sure you aren't in a state with requirements and reporting, like we are.
kgianforti is offline  
Old 08-24-2010, 03:00 PM - Thread Starter
 
PennyP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: On the web
Posts: 103
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by kgianforti View Post
ETA #2: agreement with accidential hs'er - you can't stop these kids from taking EVERYTHING in and progressing rapidly, which is why unschooling works so well. Just make sure you aren't in a state with requirements and reporting, like we are.
Where I live, there are very strict homeschooling laws... but none are relevant till kindergarten, so I still have a while to go.
PennyP is offline  
Old 08-24-2010, 03:47 PM
 
moominmamma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: In the middle of nowhere, at the centre of everything.
Posts: 5,808
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 95 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by PennyP View Post
Where I live, there are very strict homeschooling laws... but none are relevant till kindergarten, so I still have a while to go.
I live in a province with lax homeschooling laws, but am part of a voluntary program which provides financial support in exchange for planning and reporting curriculum requirements that look very strict on paper.

In practice it is easy to fit our unschooling into that mold, because my kids are so far ahead. We can do anything we want, comfortable in the knowledge that if we were ever required to prove mastery at grade level, or if our methods were ever called into question, the kids would be poster-children of academic achievement and quickly set the nay-sayers straight. If I do no active teaching or directing of their learning, my 7-year-old will still add and subtract fractions with unlike denominators, my 13-year-old will still plot trigonometric functions using programming language and my 11-year-old will still write incredible poetry with perfect spelling, beautiful similes and tasteful alliteration.

Miranda

Mountain mama to two great kids and two great grown-ups
moominmamma is online now  
Old 08-24-2010, 05:47 PM
 
kgianforti's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 766
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by PennyP View Post
Where I live, there are very strict homeschooling laws... but none are relevant till kindergarten, so I still have a while to go.
I'm sure unschooling can be done in strict states but I'm not "that good" yet! LOL! We also have required testing too but my kiddo is so far ahead as well, that it shouldn't be an issue either.
kgianforti is offline  
Old 08-24-2010, 06:13 PM
 
zebra15's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: State of Confusion
Posts: 4,746
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by kgianforti View Post
I'm sure unschooling can be done in strict states but I'm not "that good" yet! LOL! We also have required testing too but my kiddo is so far ahead as well, that it shouldn't be an issue either.
You can 'unschool' everywhere... you just need to learn how... hooking up with a good homeschool/unschool group either inperson or online will show you how. Just because it looks tricky and strict doesnt mean it is.

Mom to J and never-ending , 0/2014 items decluttered, 0/52 crafts crafts completed  crochetsmilie.gif homeschool.gif  reading.gif  modifiedartist.gif

Seeking zen in 2014.  Working on journaling and finding peace this year.  Spending my free time taking J to swimteam

zebra15 is online now  
Old 08-24-2010, 06:18 PM
 
kgianforti's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 766
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by zebra15 View Post
you just need to learn how...
Yup! That's when I'll become "that good"!
kgianforti is offline  
Old 08-25-2010, 11:15 AM
 
Lisa1970's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 2,526
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
I never ever pick books according to the number on the cover. One publisher might call something 4 yr old and it is the same stuff as a 2nd grader by another program. Some programs come from other countries where the grades are written different. Gifted or not, it is best to just pick what works. I look at if I like the style and scope and sequence, whatever is presented. If I do, then I just figure out what level my child needs. My son has some 4th grade level things mostly, one 5th grade level thing and 1 2nd grade level thing. This is because they were programs I liked, and those were the levels that fit. BJU English has kids diagramming in 4th grade. They label parts of speech in 2nd and write decent sized papers. So, I decided to do 2nd grade BJU with him. My daughter, who is years advanced, used 2nd grade BJU English when she was by public school age, 3rd grader. Yet, she did more than the public schools were doing. My son should have been a 3rd grader this year. I love Spelling Workout and used it with my daughter, but tested my son and he clearly belonged in 4th grade level. For math, he placed in to either MUS Delta, Singapore Math 2B/3A, or BJU 4. While we are not following a science program, he has been reading the BJU science 5 and asking to do the experiments so I need to go buy the teachers guide and such.

I hope I have helped!!!
Lisa1970 is offline  
Old 08-25-2010, 11:16 AM
 
Lisa1970's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 2,526
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
I want to add, one HUGE advantage to not using grade levels is that it opens your child up to anything. I think grade levels are just confining itty bitty boxes that public schools (and many, but not all, private schools) ram kids in to and won't let them out of.
Lisa1970 is offline  
Old 08-26-2010, 04:33 AM
 
theatermom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: NC
Posts: 974
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Well, I will say that sometimes ages on a box (particularly for games) can be helpful -- but usually the description is the most helpful. If you find a game you like, but aren't sure of, look it up online. There will be many reviews, and usually a longer description than on the box, and you will be much better able to determine the fit for your child. You know his strengths and weaknesses, and can choose games/books that alternately stretch and strengthen his skills and his confidence. Not every game or book has to do everything. Also, we've really loved Games for Math and Games for Reading by Peggy Kaye.

As a mother of 4 boys (at least 2 gifted, and two very, very bright), I can tell you that games, stories, and physical activity will go a very long way, especially at his age. I do remember buying my oldest a maze book (intended for 7+ year olds) just after his 3rd birthday, and he finished the entire book in a day and begged for more. It's interesting to me now because he's only recently started to like the physical process of writing. Unless your son really loves workbooks, though, I would probably hold off on them. There are so many interesting things to do!

Amanda and Dh, ds 09/00, ds 08/03, ds 10/05, and ds 05/08, and 3 :
theatermom is offline  
Old 08-29-2010, 08:19 PM
 
slvsquared's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: West Virginia
Posts: 334
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We work with where the interests are and totally skip the grade level thing. Because we homeschool, and it's seen as odd in our family, our relatives are always buying workbooks for gifts (which I think is a bit off the wall, but that's neither here nor there). So I try to eyeball where Z is so I can give them a general guideline - I just flip through a couple workbooks and get an idea for what work goes with what grade level.

She's currently working through the 1st grade level workbooks, but I really don't pull them out that often. I have an entire file drawer full, and I've only done maybe ten pages total with her in the last year. We're doing Well Trained Mind, so we primarily do the workbooks if she's having difficulty with a specific letter or # during copywork, or if we're out in a waiting room or something.

As for games, I just stock up on stuff that she likes to play that doesn't drive me mad. She's digging Othello right now, and she's also really into Uno. I much prefer that to Candyland, so I'm totally egging her on She also really enjoys www.Zoodles.com - it's age based, so I did the eyeball it thing and set the level ahead for her, and now she totally loves it.

Sandi - Work at home writer mama to Zoe the monkey girl 9/06 and Luna the zen baby 8/08
slvsquared is offline  
Old 08-30-2010, 08:18 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Lost in a good book (in San Diego)
Posts: 4,729
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
DD is probably gifted and adores workbooks. (And YES she spends the vast majority of most days digging in the mud or a bucket of water or playdough or building with blocks or playing dress up, or looking at books, or helping me cook and clean, etc etc etc.)

She's 3 and we've been using a huge K book for a while. She'll go through phases where she wants to work on it a LOT for several days. Anyway, some of the writing is too tricky but otherwise it's all pretty easy, stuff she already knows. But it's fun because coloring all the spaces with As or 1s creates a picture, etc. I figure before long we should look at another one but there's still los of pages in this one, and since she sometimes does 15 a day, when she's on a workbook bender I'd rather she had fun with this one for a while.

Eh, I guess it all just depends. A little challenge can be great for this type of kid (like, DD loves to do soduku with her dad, which is tricky but she's very into it) but of course no pushing... I do tend to ignore grade level or age on things and just go by my kid.

But I think this feeds into a greater issue... with such a young gifted kid, where I would normally be entirely unschooly (or rather, not even be thinking of school but just good playtime), it can be tricky at times to navigate anything more formal. DD is at K or above for most things, but she's still only 3. So she pulls us into learning about more advanced things, and I try to find resources and it becomes something where we ARE using materials for an older grade level... I just try to keep myself tuned in to not going too far with it, even as we are pulled along relentlessly by DD Anyway, just saying again that we try to go by the kid and get as much info about a book or product before choosing. And some are hit and miss! We got plenty of presents that were for older kids that were already too "young" for her. And some she's found other ways to play with, and some were busts but we'll use them next kid
St. Margaret is offline  
Old 08-30-2010, 11:30 PM
 
philia's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: The South
Posts: 302
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My 4 year old is doing Logic for K-2. I met with an educational psychologist about this and she said to keep moving them ahead. I have gotten a ton of nice products from the Critical Thinking Company. I know how you feel. I can tell my daughter is getting bored with the K because she wants to now answer in Spanish and she does not know a ton of Spanish. I do some at her level to get her going and then switch to a higher level. These work books are the only one's she does not get bored with. I always fear it will be too hard and she will get annoyed and not want to do the work. I start where I know she can ace it and then when it gets too hard I quit on a good note. As far as toys I buy all across the board. Have Fun and Good Luck!
philia is offline  
Old 08-31-2010, 10:09 AM
 
kgianforti's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 766
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by philia View Post
My 4 year old is doing Logic for K-2. I met with an educational psychologist about this and she said to keep moving them ahead. I have gotten a ton of nice products from the Critical Thinking Company. I know how you feel.!
Though we aren't using anything from CTC right now, I love their stuff!

I posted on this thread earlier...we started official "K" yesterday. She thrives on workbooks. For me variety is the key - levels, interests, whatever.

Having an aggressive learner definitely keeps you on your toes!
kgianforti is offline  
Old 08-31-2010, 12:28 PM
 
philia's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: The South
Posts: 302
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We have to have variety because it gets boring for them. Let me know if you come across anything you like a lot. My curent stuggle is handwriting practice. Both kids get bored. I guess you just have to keep having them do it. I don't think I liked handwriting as a kid either. The educational psychologist said to do legos. It helps their minds to see us do them and just have them be helpers.
philia is offline  
Old 08-31-2010, 12:45 PM
 
heatherdeg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Everywhere... thanks, technology!
Posts: 4,831
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dar View Post
I agree. There are so many other ways to learn with 3 year olds that are more developmentally appropriate, provide more educational benefit, and are just more fun. IMO, most workbooks for young children are more about giving them something to do to keep them busy and occupied (which makes them useful for things like waiting for a meal to be served in a restaurant) and developing fine motor skills (which can be frustrating when kids really aren't ready).

Lillian has a couple nice pages about homeschool activities for preschoolers and young children - here and here.

I think games are another story - assuming they're fun games. I knew a 3 year old who ruled at Apples to Apples, which is marked "Ages 12 and up" (we played the regular version, not the junior one). Well, actually I thought he picked his dad's card too often, but he certainly could play and play well... with a group that included a number of other players both far younger and far older than 12. As long as he's not physically or mentally too frustrated by the game, why not?
to ALL of that. Although Lillian's stuff is written for every child, they certainly "feed" the gifted child, too. Mine is now 6-1/2yo and reading stories takes a different twist with him (we take turns reading so that I can still model "reading voice" to him and force him to look at pictures to nurture his imagination) but we still read stories--ya know? Cooking with them may mean talking about the measurements, etc.



Quote:
Originally Posted by slvsquared View Post
We work with where the interests are and totally skip the grade level thing. Because we homeschool, and it's seen as odd in our family, our relatives are always buying workbooks for gifts (which I think is a bit off the wall, but that's neither here nor there). So I try to eyeball where Z is so I can give them a general guideline - I just flip through a couple workbooks and get an idea for what work goes with what grade level.

that, too.

The other thing is: there's some merit to giving them stuff that they already CAN do. For one, they can just enjoy it vs. "working". Since our kids are frequently thinking A LOT, this can be a nice break. But it also helps build confidence because they already HAVE mastered it and CAN do it. It's not always "maybe I'll get it"... in the case of things a little below their level, it's nice to have something they can nail every time. Granted, you hope that's not what they're doing ALL the time.

Two other things I wanted to point out, though. Because my son is 6-1/2 and we started dealing with his education about the same time as you, we've probably now been full circle deciding on a method and we also landed on unschooling. That doesn't mean you NEVER use a textbook. To that end, if you come across something you're going to use premade curriculum for, most of the time they have a placement test because they realize that kids develop asynchronously; and they're aware that homeschooled kids may be ahead, behind or at the same level as their age-grade. So for subject-specific curriculum especially, you will often find placement tests. If not, there are also often homeschool forums of parents using the curriculum that can help guide you.

The other thing is that I find mine is in a different "grade" depending on the subject. At 4yo he blew through K level math (both Singapore and Saxon) but now he's 6-1/2yo, hasn't had interest and is probably only about halfway through 1st grade math (with spotty "way ahead" knowledge of multiplication). For reading, there's seriously no way. Even the 4th grade phonics and grammar are ridiculous for him; but he's not yet mature enough to grasp the stories that would allow us to go on to the concepts of theme, tone, etc.

Hope this helps.

Heather - Wife , Mommy  & Health & Wellness Educator, Speaker & Consultant 
 
Dairy, soy & corn free with limited gluten... yes, really. And journeying towards peace.  Blogging about both.
 
Let me guide you to find the food and lifestyle choices...
heatherdeg is offline  
 
User Tag List

Thread Tools


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off