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Learning at Home and Beyond > Sotw?
Jennifer3141's Avatar Jennifer3141 05:35 PM 10-14-2010
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaWhit View Post
Yes, and it sounds like it is narrated by the boring teacher from Ferris Bueller. HATE it!
It puts me to sleep immediately!!!

MyLittleWonders's Avatar MyLittleWonders 06:51 PM 10-14-2010
Oh man, we love us some Jim Weiss around here - not only for SOTW but his other audio books.
tammyw's Avatar tammyw 06:52 PM 10-14-2010
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jennifer3141 View Post
It puts me to sleep immediately!!!
My kids absolutely LOVE the audio versions. I always have them playing in the car - we do those instead of the books, and it's wonderful because when we do our reading of different books, she knows most of it already, just because she listened to them several times on cd. And hey, when we're in the car, there's not much else to do anyway.

But then again, I love Jim Weiss's voice! I love all of the cd's he does.
MaWhit's Avatar MaWhit 06:54 PM 10-14-2010
We love audiobooks in general, and listen to hours and hours of them and always have one going. But the SOTW audio are wildly unpopular here. Not a single kid likes them, and they've never had that problem with any other audiobook.
Juvysen's Avatar Juvysen 07:26 PM 10-14-2010
Ok, I hope everyone doesn't think I'm crazy but...

Would it be weird to read SOTW with my (little) kids and then move on to HO or something when they get older (and are technically being homeschooled)? I love the story idea, and I'm thinking they might enjoy that, but I do like the idea of HO being chronological. I read chapter books to my 4 year old, now, and she likes them... what do you think? Overkill? I personally love history/archaeology and would love to share stuff about ancient civilizations with them now, but need a good platform to do it. i read about that stuff for fun, normally, so I don't really think of it as schoolwork, necessarily. I dunno. I'd love some opinions on it. How complex are the stories?
MyLittleWonders's Avatar MyLittleWonders 08:36 PM 10-14-2010
Why not spend the next year or two doing prehistory - you can use the Usborne Encyclopedia (which you'd need for HO anyway), plus tons of books from the library to cover topics before ancient Mesopotamia/ancient Egypt. Overall, I think SOTW would probably be mostly interesting to your dd, but they are a bit long and if you are going to recover it in 2'ish years, then it might be too repetitive. Another idea is spend the next two years just reading picture books about ancient times - myths from the major civilizations/around the world, plus some picture books about the different civilizations. Keep it kind of light and pleasurable. Then, when you get to HO in first grade, you've have built a bit of a foundation without having already read through one of the recommended spines. Just ideas.

*This coming from one who has a 4 year old who typically listens in on his brother's history lessons, and who will be starting HO in 2 years as a first grader. But, when I read SOTW, it is not aimed at him, nor is he required to listen.
naturegirl7's Avatar naturegirl7 08:41 PM 10-14-2010
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jennifer3141 View Post
Nature, could you please move up here? We'd love to have you in our history co-op!!!
I'd love to have a coop to join! Or maybe just a real live homeschooling friend! LOL Thanks for the invite

Funny thing is - History was the subject I was dreading the most (and then math!). I HATED history as a kid. It was dry and booooooooooring. Nothing but dates, people, battles, blah blah blah. I liked the social history part of it. I liked learning about what the people did, ate, where they lived, what they wore, did they go to school, did they work, what jobs were acceptable for what groups of people, etc But in school, especially elem school, we didn't learn much social history. My brother is a history buff and watches the history channel for fun.
DS is obsessed with history. BEGS to do history every day. Listens to his various audio books - SOTW, Adventures of Odysseus, Greek myth, various Folk Tales. He goes nuts over Ancient Greece and Ancient Egypt. I personally do love those too. But he devours documentaries and books in a way that puts me to shame! I swear he knows more than I do right now and he is only 5!! It is his big passion and I am along for the ride. And enjoying every minute of it (unlike math! LOL) He carries around his 2 Usborne Encyclopedias with him, reads them for fun, reads them in the car. It amazes me. I think I like SOTW more than he does, just cuz it gives a bit of social content and personalization to the lesson, and has alot of great activities suggested. But he LOVES is Usborne books, the HO pairs up with the Usborne time line perfectly.




I think that it is important to know the historical events such as founding dates, wars, etc. But the social history is soooo much more important to me. WHY was there a war? religion plays a huge part in social history, and I love studying comparitive religion - we are bringing it into our stories, on our own. Mythology, fables, etc are all going to be included when possible as part of cultural studies of the time period.

What I don't care for about SOTW is the manner in which it includes Biblical stories as factual history. Joseph and his many colored coat is there as a history lesson. That is not history, but mythology. Label it as such and we are good. But when you start labelling Biblical stories as historical fact and Greek mythology as "stories" and myths - that bothers me. Present all the various religious stories and beliefs in a manner which compliments the social history of the time - not as historical events. *stepping down off my soap box now*

But my biggest complaint by far is the jumpiness of the timeline. I personally like the HO timeline better. It flows well, you learn about the progression of cultures as they developed. You aren't jumping back and forth in time. And it pairs flawlessly with the Usborne books. SOTW is really just a supplemental here. GREAT, but not enough meat on it to satisfy us at all.
Bluegoat's Avatar Bluegoat 09:32 PM 10-14-2010
Quote:
Originally Posted by Juvysen View Post
Ok, I hope everyone doesn't think I'm crazy but...

Would it be weird to read SOTW with my (little) kids and then move on to HO or something when they get older (and are technically in school)? I love the story idea, and I'm thinking they might enjoy that, but I do like the idea of HO being chronological. I read chapter books to my 4 year old, now, and she likes them... what do you think? Overkill? I personally love history/archaeology and would love to share stuff about ancient civilizations with them now, but need a good platform to do it. i read about that stuff for fun, normally, so I don't really think of it as schoolwork, necessarily. I dunno. I'd love some opinions on it. How complex are the stories?
I had thought of this, since we aren't starting our "real" history until next year, and I actually had some stuff planned out. But now that I am actually getting started, I am finding that isn't what we are actually doing - we are more following dd's interests in a kind of general social studies/mythology/biography genre. One week she was interested in the minotaur, another in totem poles, and so on.

My feeling is that reading a lot of this stuff in her little mind will serve her well when we begin a more directed study next year.
Island Mommy's Avatar Island Mommy 05:14 AM 10-16-2010
Quote:
Originally Posted by naturegirl7 View Post
What I don't care for about SOTW is the manner in which it includes Biblical stories as factual history. Joseph and his many colored coat is there as a history lesson. That is not history, but mythology. Label it as such and we are good. But when you start labelling Biblical stories as historical fact and Greek mythology as "stories" and myths - that bothers me. Present all the various religious stories and beliefs in a manner which compliments the social history of the time - not as historical events. *stepping down off my soap box now*
Exactly what naturegirl said. Now, I was looking at an older edition that I got from the library so perhaps things are laid out more clearly in the later editions.
I'd have liked notes for parents that gave more information on the source of the historical information, how accurate it was considered to be by experts, whether there was disagreement amongst scholars as to whether it was fact or mythology, etc.
Jennifer3141's Avatar Jennifer3141 10:16 AM 10-16-2010
Quote:
Originally Posted by Island Mommy View Post
Exactly what naturegirl said. Now, I was looking at an older edition that I got from the library so perhaps things are laid out more clearly in the later editions.
I'd have liked notes for parents that gave more information on the source of the historical information, how accurate it was considered to be by experts, whether there was disagreement amongst scholars as to whether it was fact or mythology, etc.
That would be awesome but that's more scholarly than I think SOTW actually is.
tammyw's Avatar tammyw 12:36 PM 10-16-2010
I do agree it would be nice if there were notes "hey this is a Bible story" or "this is actually a Greek Myth", however it doesn't bother me enough not to use it. I haven't found anything that is as good for us (especially because we love the audio) and we've spent enough time on Bible stories and Greek Mythology that my dd does know most of the time what's what.
AngelBee's Avatar AngelBee 01:49 PM 10-19-2010
Quote:
Originally Posted by crunchy_mama View Post
So, would HO work for someone who is Christian? We are Catholic specifically and there are not a lot of good Catholic options like this and I think I would prefer secularly over fund. prot- which seems to be the vast majority of other options.
I am checking it out right now. I am using alot of the same resources that it uses, so I "asume" it is not anti-Christian/Catholic.

You can get the first 11 weeks of each book free on their website to try.
crunchy_mama's Avatar crunchy_mama 04:43 PM 10-19-2010
Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelBee View Post
I am checking it out right now. I am using alot of the same resources that it uses, so I "asume" it is not anti-Christian/Catholic.

You can get the first 11 weeks of each book free on their website to try.
Cool, I did look some on the preview but not in-depth yet. I plan to look into that more for next year.
Bluegoat's Avatar Bluegoat 05:22 PM 10-19-2010
For those that use HO, do you find it is particularly focused on the US at later levels?
MyLittleWonders's Avatar MyLittleWonders 05:50 PM 10-19-2010
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluegoat View Post
For those that use HO, do you find it is particularly focused on the US at later levels?
We have yet to make it that far. We are on our second time through Ancients, level 1, and will start our second time through Medieval Times level 1 next year. My thinking, based on the books it uses as spines, it keeps a pretty global focus - bringing in US history as it comes up in the bigger picture. I do have Early Modern, level 1, as I was planning on doing that this year, but started over again because ds#1 and ds#2 are on the same history cycle, and ds#2 was too young, in my opinion, to jump so soon into Early Modern and Modern Times.

That said, the lessons from Early Modern Times include four lessons that seem specifically to include US history:
Lesson 12: North America (may touch on you Canadians too )
Lesson 13: Slavery
Lesson 14: American Revolution
Lesson 15: United States of America

Otherwise the lessons seem to jump around the world a bit. One thing I notice is that instead of following the Usborne Encyclopedia chronologically (and in page order), Early Modern seems to jump around by region rather than by time.
excitedtobeamom's Avatar excitedtobeamom 06:24 PM 10-19-2010
We love SOTW here! My kids starting listening to it at 4 and 6. They listened to the first one about 3 times through and they are now starting the second one. We get them as CDs and listen to them on long drives in the car. We have had lots of great discussions. I have learned a lot! My seven year old takes them in her room and listens to them often.
LianneM's Avatar LianneM 12:05 AM 10-20-2010
I just got the first set of CDs and we listened to some tonight. DS and I enjoyed listening together, and my 2yo went right to sleep listening to Jim Weiss which was perfect Happy mama here!

We're doing Sonlight so it's a nice review/addition to what we've talked about so far. I'm not sure how far ahead of it we will stay - I expect we'll catch up to our book reading and maybe be ahead on SOTW, but I don't think it will matter much either way. I expect we'll listen to it more than once
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