Independent summer reading program/software for a 9 year old struggling reader? - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 28 Old 05-25-2011, 10:48 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Hello, homeschool families!  I am the parent of a 9 year old 3rd grader who attends public school.  We are looking for a reading program for our child to use at home during the summer break.  DC struggled with fluency during part of her development as a reader and, although she has made great strides recently, could still benefit from some extra reading support this summer.  

 

We did Reading Reflex last summer because the end of 2nd grade was a time when DC was really struggling.  With Reading Reflex and the help of a tutor (who did both Quickreads for fluency and word work for phonetic awareness) DC made huge strides. DC is now reading for pleasure and catching up to grade level reading ability.

 

We have a mellow summer planned because we have a newborn at home.  I plan on doing my best to support DC's reading myself but I would really love a child-guided/independent reading program for DC to do this summer.

 

I looked at a couple of the Orton-Gillingham computer programs and would LOVE to get one of these for DC but we can't really afford either of the ones I saw ($250).  Do you have any suggestions for something similar but with a less expensive price tag?  Are there any other programs you would recommend?  

 

Thank you for your help!  

 

 


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#2 of 28 Old 05-25-2011, 12:12 PM
 
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If she's already reading for pleasure, then I'd just keep getting her access to books she likes. Maybe order some to come in the mail as a special treat.

 

In the absence of issues or pressures a later reader will start reading around age 9, so your dd is right at the age to make huge improvements in reading without special effort.

 

Honestly, I think a reading program will give her the wrong message. Unless she's asking for one, it will say to her that she's still a person who has to work hard at reading. Despite all of her previous work and despite being able to read, that she's not really a reader.

 

 

Tell your local librarians what books your dd enjoys and reads easily, and they'll be able to suggest titles that are a bit more of a stretch--and also much more difficult books that kids with her interests push through regardless.  Basically, think of it like literally stretching, getting closer bit by bit to touching the toes--and then being able to go past the toes as ability increases.

 

Also, you reading to her and books on tape will also improve her own reading ability. Get her a CD player, get some soothing books that you can read out loud quietly when she needs connections when the baby needs to have things calm.

 

And encourage/allow her to read to the baby. Don't pay attention, let her read to a little person who will have absolutely no idea if she's doing it "right" or "wrong".

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#3 of 28 Old 05-25-2011, 02:31 PM
 
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Landed here from your cross-posting in Learning in School...

 

I have to agree with Sapphire, but have you looked into whether your library has a summer reading program? All the libraries here have them. The child signs up for free, reads a certain number of books, then gets a prize at the end - here the prizes are coupons for things like free tickets to the local minor baseball team's games, pizza, etc. I'm not normally into rewarding the kids for doing things like reading, but make an exception for the summer program. My oldest son was a reluctant reader last year, and the prizes were a big motivator for him. This year, he is an enthusiastic reader who always has a book in his hand, so it doesn't seem to have ruined his chances of becoming a lover of reading.

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#4 of 28 Old 05-25-2011, 02:36 PM
 
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i would recommend hooked on phonics master reader. it is perfect for your child's age.  unlike the other HOP programs, this is computer based (CD-ROM). it is specifically geared to help with fluency.  basically, there are four levels to the program (each has it's own CD-ROM, reading cards, and a chapter book at the end of each level).  your child does a lesson on the computer & then there is a reading card following each computer assignment. at the end of the level, they read a chapter book, which my daughter loved the stories!  i found mine used for $40, including shipping from homeschoolclassfieds.com. you could check at amazon too. to see samples of the program, visit the HOP website (although it is crazy expensive there).  anyway, i highly recommend the program and plan to use it with my son as well. it is painless, very effective, and the lessons are short.  hth.


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#5 of 28 Old 05-25-2011, 06:32 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Hey, ya'll  

 

We really do try to make reading interesting and relevant for DC.  I actually think that DC's broad exposure to books that interest her may have caused some of her reluctance in reading on her own.  Her comprehension and interest level was so much "higher" than her reading ability that I think she was bored by the books she was able to read.  

 

DC is currently reading one of the Lightning Thief books and she really loves it.  It's above her reading level and she skips quite a few words.  I think that is FINE but I do think, having also been told by a few reading specialists, that DC benefits to explicit reading instruction.  That was easy enough for me to provide last summer but DC is now at a level that is difficult for me to teach...which I why I'm looking for some sort of guided program for her.  

 

I do think a computer program that is made to be fun and interactive would be great.  The computer is still new enough that DC thinks of "educational" games as fun.  

 

I will check out the Hooked on Phonics program.  It's nice to see that there are programs like that for children who are already "readers".  

 

Does anyone have any experience with one of the Orton-Gillingham programs?  

 

ETA: we will make the library our friend this summer for sure.  Our city library reading program seems kind of cheezy to me but I will give DC a chance to participate.  


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#6 of 28 Old 05-26-2011, 05:21 AM
 
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A simple way I have provided low key reading instruction to my later reader is by reading a chapter of her book aloud to her.  That way, she can sit next to me and see how I pronounce the words she might have missed/skipped, and it helps keep her interest in the book, because she can follow a chunk of the plot easily while I read, and that aids following the story while she's doing the hard work of reading for herself.  My experience is that once they find a book they want to push through despite it being a little too hard, struggling readers can really take off without formal reading instruction.  And the problem with giving formal reading instruction is that it's often boring and can inadvertently reinforce the idea that reading is not their thing, and that is a self-belief that can be very very hard to kill.

 

If you really want to do something, and its not way below her level (I have trouble imagining how a child could be reading the Lightning Thief at all while needing help with phonics), you could check out progressivephonics.com  -- they are free downloadable readers that are extremely well done, and well suited to the later reader. They are funny and quick, and the parent and child take turns reading.  

 

HTH!

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#7 of 28 Old 05-26-2011, 07:19 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I've been thinking a lot about this thread and how to describe DC as a reader.  First I would like to be open about something.  I'm having a sensitive response to some of the suggestions for DC.  No one in particular, btw.  I was thinking last night about why that would be.  The thing is that we have really tried LOTS of things to help DC read - so many that I doubt there are any of the more obvious suggestions that we haven't tried.  She has been exposed to MANY different types of books, we are very focused on finding books that interest her, we have done 5 kinds of reading with her, books on tape, a variety of 'tricks' and etc.  The one thing we haven't tried (other than Reading Relex, which worked VERY well for DC) is some sort of home reading program or software.  

 

I'm not a stress case about DC's reading and if you knew me you would know that I am basically incapable of forcing my child to do anything that would make her miserable.  And during the summer?  No way, man - that's sacred time for fun!  I think that because we are so focused on fun as a family that DC craves things like "homework" and "reading work".  I told her this morning that I was looking for a computer program for her this summer and she got all excited.  

 

I understand that reading software or reading programs aren't for everyone.  Believe me, if it weren't for DC I would probably be pretty anti-reading "gimmick" too.  The thing is that she seems to be a fairly unique reader.  I would describe it like trying to describe to someone how to walk.  I know that many kids just "magically" learn to read some early, some late but DC isn't one of those kids.  She is bright and loves stories.  She devours books on tape.  Lightning Thief is a book she has listened to many, many times, which is why I think she is able to read it even though it's above her reading level.  Her reading progress has come from being explained to how words work followed by practice reading books.  Before getting some explicit instructions she was making very little progress despite reading frequently.  With these basic decoding skills she learned through her tutor and Reading Reflex she is able to apply other skills that come more naturally to her (good vocabulary, comprehension and etc.) and she made great strides.  She reached about a mid-2nd grade level of word work/decoding skills but hasn't been instructed beyond that because she does not have anyone who can teach her that right now.  I have seen her reading progress slow since she stopped getting explicit instruction.  Which brings me here to find a program for her.  

 

I did find this site that has a lot of the more advanced word work sheets.  The thing is that I would have a very difficult time explaining this to DC.  A program would be better - if they exist.  

 

Here's an example of what I'm talking about

 

http://www.resourceroom.net./readspell/wordlists/closed/closedsyldiv.asp

 

Thanks for letting me vent and describe my DC a little better.  I really do appreciate the help.

 


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#8 of 28 Old 05-26-2011, 07:35 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Onatightrope, I looked up Progressivephonics and I agree that this is below DC's level.  Too bad because the price is right!  

 

BTW, I did post in "Learning at School" to ask parents from that forum to chime in.  There have been a few responses over there, which I am addressing here as well.  I'm going to hop over there and let them know that I'm just going to be posting here (I didn't mean to have two threads going).  

 

Another thought after speaking to DH is to maybe focus DC's reading instruction on writing and spelling.  That way we wouldn't be interfering with her reading for pleasure and she would be getting some (also much needed) help in that area.  If anyone knows a good program for spelling and/or writing that would be great too!  Also, writing and spelling are two areas where DH & I have not been too involved so the "first step" type suggestions are most welcome.  

 

ETA: on the other thread Linda on the Move said that kids get to a stage where reading is a better teacher (better than explicit instruction).  I feel like that's a lot of what ya'll are saying and I do agree and get why you would want me to keep that in mind.  I will remain open to that idea but DC was doing so well with instruction that I want to offer a bit more of that for her, yk?  

 

Also, I'll look into Explode the Code.  Thanks!  

 

ETA again:  To get an idea of DC's reading level/interest/journey: DC is reading "Lighting Thief" in a large part from memory and is skipping lots of words.  She loved the "Judy Moody" series, which was more on her reading level (although she was reading them having had the books read to her before as well).  "Judy Moody" was the breakthrough series that took her from a reluctant reader to someone who enjoys reading.  She is reading "Junie B. Jones" independently and that series may be a bit easy for her - thought I think she is getting a lot of good practice and pleasure reading "easy" books.  That latest favorite is a series called "Bad Kitty".  We tried "Dragon Rider", which she has not had read to her and it was much too difficult.  We alternated reading paragraphs of "Because of Winn Dixie", which was read to her in school and that went very well.  She LOVED "Harry Potter" and but doesn't want to try reading it.  


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#9 of 28 Old 05-26-2011, 10:05 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IdentityCrisisMama View Post  She is reading "Junie B. Jones" independently and that series may be a bit easy for her - thought I think she is getting a lot of good practice and pleasure reading "easy" books. 


I think that reading books that are *too easy* for her is really, really good for her. It builds fluency. It lets her know that reading is fun. She can focus on ALL the words. There is lots of value in easy reading and re-reading.

 

Do you read a chapter of a book every day to her? Not alternating, not trying to get her to do or get anything from it but just the pleasure of enjoying the story together? I truly believe this is the best thing I've done for my kids' reading. And I still do it -- even though they are teens and have been reading at college level for years.

 

 

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#10 of 28 Old 05-26-2011, 10:29 AM
 
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In addition to whatever fluency-specific program looks like it will work for her:

 

She's reading the Percy Jackson books and skipping words? For that it could help to get her a dictionary, explain it's for figuring out what a new word means more precisely when the meaning isn't completely clear from context. Actually, since you've got a computer, dictionary.com is great because it has sound files of all the words. And Wikipedia for getting things like pictures of new objects and expanded information on stuff that's interesting from books.

 

I wish they had a freerice for kids, there's a lot of words I've learned from that, but the vocabulary used by that game is pretty obscure.

 

 

My assumption that your dd was following the typical pattern of late readers and just taking off around age 9 because she was finally developing that direction was because I was assuming that a child in the 3rd grade of public school would have already had explicit reading instruction, and fairly intense reading instruction starting in 2nd grade.  Basically, that she'd been having instruction all along and it was just now clicking because she was ready for reading to click.

 

 

I'm also looking at this thinking about reading as a kid and what made me like reading and get better at it and what made me roll my eyes with boredom. Your dd's reading about the same level of stuff I was reading at her age and the same type of material, and the examples in the programs you've mention so far would not have appealed to me in the slightest. Especially not during summer break. OTOH, your dd is used to working at reading, so she might have fun with a reading-instruction game. When you've got a few choices available, get free trial versions and let her try them out. Then buy the one where she asks if there's more to the game.

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Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post

Do you read a chapter of a book every day to her? Not alternating, not trying to get her to do or get anything from it but just the pleasure of enjoying the story together? I truly believe this is the best thing I've done for my kids' reading. And I still do it -- even though they are teens and have been reading at college level for years.

 

 


Generally, yes.  This was the way we did things for years.  I will say that life has taken a turn and I read to her less now, that's for sure.  It's a difficult thing because there isn't a single resource for helping children learn to read that doesn't mention the value of reading to our kids.  It's hard to keep thinking this philosopy is relevant to your child when you "did everything right" and still have a struggling reader.  


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She's reading the Percy Jackson books and skipping words? For that it could help to get her a dictionary, explain it's for figuring out what a new word means more precisely when the meaning isn't completely clear from context. Actually, since you've got a computer, dictionary.com is great because it has sound files of all the words. And Wikipedia for getting things like pictures of new objects and expanded information on stuff that's interesting from books.

 

 


Cross post SS, thanks for your response.  We are doing the dictionary.  That is one of those "oh, she's ready for that" moments we've had recently.  The interesting thing with DC is that she normally skips words because she can't "say" them, not because she doesn't know what they mean, yk?  DH has some cool books on his phone that will actually pronounce words in the text - that is AWESOME for DC.  Too bad it's on DH's phone.  

 

I do plan on introducing DC to the computer more this summer.  Maybe something as simple as teaching her how to do internet searches will be enough for her - it will help her learn to spell things correctly and etc.  She has always have curiosity and has been asking me questions I don't know the answer to for years.  ;-)  

Quote:

My assumption that your dd was following the typical pattern of late readers and just taking off around age 9 because she was finally developing that direction was because I was assuming that a child in the 3rd grade of public school would have already had explicit reading instruction, and fairly intense reading instruction starting in 2nd grade.  Basically, that she'd been having instruction all along and it was just now clicking because she was ready for reading to click.


True, and that would be a good assumption to make.  The problem with the instruction at school is that it just isn't the type that DC benefits most from.  DC's 2nd grade reading teacher just took the Othon-Gillingham method course last summer and told me that she wished she knew the program when she was teaching DC.  DC is not getting explicit instruction in school this year because we opted to keep her out of reading intervention this year.  She had a private tutor instead (no longer available).  It's a very small school and I don't want to explain all the details but the do things a bit differently and DC isn't getting as much personal instruction as other kids because of our choice to keep her with the rest of the class for reading.  

 

I will keep your idea of late readers taking off at 9 though.  I would freaking jump for joy if that was the case for DC!!  When would a parent be able to see this/what would this look like?  
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sapphire_chan 

 

I'm also looking at this thinking about reading as a kid and what made me like reading and get better at it and what made me roll my eyes with boredom. Your dd's reading about the same level of stuff I was reading at her age and the same type of material, and the examples in the programs you've mention so far would not have appealed to me in the slightest. Especially not during summer break. OTOH, your dd is used to working at reading, so she might have fun with a reading-instruction game. When you've got a few choices available, get free trial versions and let her try them out. Then buy the one where she asks if there's more to the game.

 

Yes, DC does have an odd idea of what is fun.  We are a super un-structured family, DC has no homework and I'm a total mess at being a "strict mom" and because of that I think DC gets a kick out of some of the things that other kids come to resent.  

 


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Originally Posted by IdentityCrisisMama View Post
 I will say that life has taken a turn and I read to her less now, that's for sure.  It's a difficult thing because there isn't a single resource for helping children learn to read that doesn't mention the value of reading to our kids.  It's hard to keep thinking this philosopy is relevant to your child when you "did everything right" and still have a struggling reader.  


IMHO, this is not the time to back down on reading aloud. In addition to helping raise avid readers, it's also a WONDERFUL way to connect with adolescents. Life will get more complicated with her other the next few years, and having a warm, fuzzy way to end the day for the two of you *could* really help with that.

 

I don't think that reading aloud is a magic pill. Both my kids at explicit phonics instruction when they were young. But I still think is an amazing parenting tool that is often skipped over because it is so very simple.

 

I also think she's really young. For one of my DDs, reading was still work when she was 9. She really took off at 10, and at 11, tested for reading at college level. I also think it's really normal for kids to skip words when they are reading something that is a stretch for them. It's one of the reason that kids in this age group enjoy re-reading books - they get more of the words the second time!

 

What you describe about how she reads and how you feel about how she reads are out of sync to me. She just doesn't sound like she's doing that bad, but you sound like you think she is extremely behind, and that if you don't do everything just right, she'll never catch up! 

 

The Explode the Code books I mentioned earlier could provide more explicit instruction in a mellow way.

 

Are you guys doing a summer reading program at a library or book store?

 

Also, have her eyes been checked and is there any possibility of a learning disability? Nothing you say jumps out at me as a red flag, but it's always good stuff to rule out.

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#14 of 28 Old 05-26-2011, 05:46 PM
 
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Cross post SS, thanks for your response.  We are doing the dictionary.  That is one of those "oh, she's ready for that" moments we've had recently.  The interesting thing with DC is that she normally skips words because she can't "say" them, not because she doesn't know what they mean, yk?  DH has some cool books on his phone that will actually pronounce words in the text - that is AWESOME for DC.  Too bad it's on DH's phone.  

 

I do plan on introducing DC to the computer more this summer.  Maybe something as simple as teaching her how to do internet searches will be enough for her - it will help her learn to spell things correctly and etc.  She has always have curiosity and has been asking me questions I don't know the answer to for years.  ;-)  


True, and that would be a good assumption to make.  The problem with the instruction at school is that it just isn't the type that DC benefits most from.  DC's 2nd grade reading teacher just took the Othon-Gillingham method course last summer and told me that she wished she knew the program when she was teaching DC.  DC is not getting explicit instruction in school this year because we opted to keep her out of reading intervention this year.  She had a private tutor instead (no longer available).  It's a very small school and I don't want to explain all the details but the do things a bit differently and DC isn't getting as much personal instruction as other kids because of our choice to keep her with the rest of the class for reading.  

 

I will keep your idea of late readers taking off at 9 though.  I would freaking jump for joy if that was the case for DC!!  When would a parent be able to see this/what would this look like?  
 

 

Yes, DC does have an odd idea of what is fun.  We are a super un-structured family, DC has no homework and I'm a total mess at being a "strict mom" and because of that I think DC gets a kick out of some of the things that other kids come to resent.  

 

The age 9 thing is based on reading about the experiences of other homeschooling families and also my own little brother's experiences. He went from having tons of trouble with the BOB books to reading David Eddings practically overnight with no new instruction. And I know he wasn't reading as of his 9th birthday because I was the one reading him bedtime stories and he never gave any sign if I happened to read a word wrong.

 

It is probably the case that your dd could've read faster if she'd had the right sort of assistance earlier, but that doesn't preclude her having a cognitive leap for things to click in more easily.

 

You can save bookmarks to your desk top so that she only has to double click to get a useful website. I bet she could actually learn to navigate very well very quickly, but the bookmark option is a fast way to give her a place other than your dh's phone to search for how to say words (once in a job my boss, a coworker, and I all stopped in the middle of a conversation to go look up a word on a 4th person's computer because we all blanked on how it was said lol.gif.)
 

 

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#15 of 28 Old 05-26-2011, 07:04 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Also, have her eyes been checked and is there any possibility of a learning disability? Nothing you say jumps out at me as a red flag, but it's always good stuff to rule out.


I don't think she has any eye problems but I do think she has a mild learning disability.  The school asked that we have her evaluated but because she made made so much progress after her tutor we decided to put that off.  Her tutor is AWESOME and highly experienced in reading.  She said she thinks "there's something going on" but doesn't feel like DC would benefit from a LD diagnosis.  The school will have one more evaluation before the end of the year and I don't expect them to make another request for a LD evaluation.  If they do, however, we will consider taking them up on it.  I WISH we could afford the Orton-Gillingham evaluation but it's way out of our price range.  

 

For the record I'm not crazy obsessed with DC's reading though I can see how that could be inferred from my posts.  In reality, I just don't have a lot of free time and DC's reading sometimes takes the back burner.  It just happend to be on my mind today.  Plus, I feel a little like I should defend why want a computer program for her so maybe I'm coming off wrong.  

 

Like SS said, I guess I also feel some guilt for not finding a Reading Reflex type program for her earlier because it really did help her so much.  I feel like if she had had that at the end of 1st grade it could have saved her a lot of grief.  I feel like we could still catch up a bit and don't want to miss the opprotunity.  

 

I'm also worried in part because DC is missing some things because of her reading.  Until recently she couldn't play some games with her peers and etc.  I don't want her to miss anything because she's behind on reading.  

 

 

 


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#16 of 28 Old 05-26-2011, 07:35 PM
 
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There's also a fairly good chance that back in 1st grade she wouldn't have been ready for the Reading Reflex program and you would've set it aside and not come back to it when she was ready for it.

 

All kinds of possibilities. The important points are 1. your dd doesn't feel like a failure, 2. she likes reading, and 3. she is reading. Which are the three main concerns with late readers in order of importance.

 

So success!

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#17 of 28 Old 05-26-2011, 08:27 PM
 
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I don't think she has any eye problems but I do think she has a mild learning disability.  The school asked that we have her evaluated but because she made made so much progress after her tutor we decided to put that off.  Her tutor is AWESOME and highly experienced in reading.  She said she thinks "there's something going on" but doesn't feel like DC would benefit from a LD diagnosis.  The school will have one more evaluation before the end of the year and I don't expect them to make another request for a LD evaluation.


 

 


Why don't you request an LD evaluation from the school in writing? 

 

Is she in a private school or a public school? Is that part of the issue?

 

I agree that her having different instruction earlier might not have made any difference at all. Some kids are just wired to read a little later than No Child Left Behind dictates they should.

 


but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

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#18 of 28 Old 05-27-2011, 06:03 AM
 
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I'm here following your thread in LAS.  I have a few ideas, but I wanted to first acknowledge how much thought and effort you've already put into your dd's reading.

 

OK-just lost my whole post, darn it.  My ideas in a nutshell-reading aloud to model fluency.  Reader's Theater is a great, fun way to work on fluency.  You can try on line or a teacher's store for this in your dd's grade level.  I like the scholastic website for ideas and info.  If you're familiar with the Accelerated Reading program and know your dd's level, you could use that to find books in the lower end of your dd's "zone"-again, lower level books will giver her practice with fluency.

 

Not sure if this appeals to you, but have you looked at the Kindle?  There seem to be lots of features that allow for accessing such things as word defintitions as they're reading.  One of my children has been using a Kindle in school, and the features are compelling.  I wasn't a fan initially, but we may be purchasing one ourselves now.  I know another poster suggested a dictionary.  I am all for dictionaries, but when a  child is reading, stopping in the middle of a sentence to navigate the dictionary can be enough to throw everything off.  One of my kids used a pen that could scan words and them pronounce them--can't remeber exactly what this was, but it was not terrific, although there may be better items on the market now.

 

I apologize if this has been addressed, but is there a summer reading program available at your school?  Or perhaps a teacher who would like to offer some private, on hour summer sessions?  I personally find that one on one work is much more effective for very specific skill building.

 

Good luck.

 

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#19 of 28 Old 05-27-2011, 07:16 AM - Thread Starter
 
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A pen that scans words would be such a great tool for DC!  Thanks.  Off to do a web search...  

 

We would LOVE a tutor for DC this summer but don't have the money right now.  I'm seriously considering trying to understand "word work" (similar to the link I posted above) a bit better so maybe I can just do that with her this summer.  I'll check out the Accelerated Reading program.  And I agree that the Schoolastic site is helpful.  I like their book wizard a lot.  

 

 

Re: LD - we know how to get an evaluation but for a variety of reasons (some addressed in PPs) we do not want DC evaluated right now.  Charter school, if I didn't already say.  

 

 

Any ideas for Orton-Gillingham resources for free or on the cheap would be greatly appreciated!  There is one mama here (a mod I think) who shared her blog with me that had some good O-G resources but they were, unfortunately, for younger kids.  If anyone reading this is interested I can dig that up.  


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#20 of 28 Old 05-27-2011, 10:31 AM
 
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I just wanted to follow up to say that I don't question your interest in trying a computer program with your DD, in case you thought I was dismissing the idea in my post in LAS. I'm just not familiar enough with any to recommend one. It's a good idea. I hope you can find something suitable that your DD enjoys. 

 

In case you are interested in some possible series that might interest her, here's a few that my DD liked that are in the age 8 to 12 range: 

- Casson Family (Saffy's Angel, Indigo's Star and others) by Hilary McKay

- Clarice Bean by Lauren Child

- Skulduggery Pleasant by Derek Landy (a fantasy series with a girl in the lead protagonist role - unlike HP and Percy Jackson where the girl is really just a sidekick). 

 

 

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#21 of 28 Old 05-27-2011, 10:48 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks, OOF - I'm feeling good about this thread but thanks for checking in.  I guess I am a little sensitive to the subject, probably because what I think DC needs and my overall parenting instincts are at odds over this issue.  I appreciate yours and everyone's suggestions.  Thanks the the series suggestions for older readers.  I feel like I know a lot of the series for younger readers but the ones you suggested (especially Skuldggery Pleasant) sound great for DC.  

 

I'm not especially optimistic about finding an affordable program for DC but this thread prompted me to go searching and because of that I found a link I really, really like (I posted it above).  

 

 


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#22 of 28 Old 05-27-2011, 11:49 AM
 
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I have friends whose children did a summer program called the Institute of Reading Development: http://readingprograms.org/community-partners/

 

It was offered through our local university (and in a lot of different communities nationwide), and they have targeted skills that they address for different levels of readers.  So, for children your daughter's age, they recommend working on long-word decoding, fluency, comprehension and reading speed. I remember thinking the program was a bit pricey (~$500?) when our friends asked if we were interested, so you may not want to do it. But looking at their website might give you ideas of the kinds of things to try or to work on. (We didn't do it because our kids didn't need the extra help.)

 

 


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#23 of 28 Old 05-28-2011, 07:54 AM
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Hey there!  I have only read the first 12 posts, so sorry if I repeat.  Here is what I would do based on the fact that reading reflex helped your dd a bunch.  

 

1.  Get All About Spelling (AAS)-- this is an Orton Gillingham spelling program.  It is easily done in the home, moves faster than Barton, and can be connected easily to reading.  We are actually using it with my moderately dyslexic dd.  Reading reflex helped her a bunch, but she continues to need explicit instruction.  We borrowed Barton from a friend and my dd found it painful.  I also thought that it was over the top for her.  No wonder it works so well for profoundly dyslexic kids!  While I know it would do the job, I thought it might kill my dds love for reading.  The best part (in regards to reading) about AAS is that it teaches the different syllable types.  For my dd, this is key to her decoding longer words.  It gives her a strategy to use.  They also have "readers" that go along with the spelling books.  They are cute stories, but probably below you dds reading level.  

 

2.  I agree with others that reading "easy" books really helps build fluency.  For my dd, that alone won't do the trick.  But doing it along with something like AAS is working well.

 

3.  I have my eye on the Rewards program.  I might use it with my dd in about 6 months if my dd still needs help with longer words. I don't know the cost yet, but it I hear about it a lot on the dyslexia support groups.   http://www.soprislearning.com/cs/Satellite?c=CLG_Content_C&childpagename=Sopris%2FSopris_Layout&cid=1277940944155&pagename=Sopris_Wrapper&rendermode=previewnoinsit

 

BTW:  you are focused on reading vs spelling so unless your dd actually needs a lot of help with spelling, I would kinda "cruise" through the AAS books.  For example, the first few lessons in level one are about separating sounds and learning the sound/letter connection.  Your dd would probably be fine with a "quick review" of that because it was covered well in reading reflex.  While the lessons are simple, you can probably do a couple/day.  When you get to a challenging one--or one that you think will really help unlock the reading code, slow down and focus on it for a bit.  The lessons are short a quick--about 15-20 minutes a day for most of them.

 

Amy

 

 


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#24 of 28 Old 05-30-2011, 09:12 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks AAK, lots of good info in your post.  If you don't mind me asking - what materials did you buy for AAS?  I was looking for them second hand and they seem to sell for more than the cost new on the AAS site.  I'm fine with new (especially if it's cheaper!) but it's got me worrying that I am maybe not buying the complete package needed for my DC.  

 

Can you look at this order and let me know if this is all that is needed to get started with Level 1?  

 

 

Basic Interactive Kit 
[remove]
Basic Interactive Kit $29.95 /each
All About Spelling Level 1 
[remove]
Includes teacher's book and one student Material Packet $29.95 /each

 

Thanks, mama!  


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#25 of 28 Old 05-30-2011, 04:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IdentityCrisisMama View Post

Thanks AAK, lots of good info in your post.  If you don't mind me asking - what materials did you buy for AAS?  I was looking for them second hand and they seem to sell for more than the cost new on the AAS site.  I'm fine with new (especially if it's cheaper!) but it's got me worrying that I am maybe not buying the complete package needed for my DC.  

 

Can you look at this order and let me know if this is all that is needed to get started with Level 1?  

 

 

Basic Interactive Kit 
[remove]
Basic Interactive Kit $29.95 /each
All About Spelling Level 1 
[remove]
Includes teacher's book and one student Material Packet $29.95 /each

 

Thanks, mama!  


That is exactly what I ordered for level one.  The only other thing I use is a cheap cookie sheet as a magnet board.  After level one, each level is about $40.  And, as you have seen--resale is good on this product.  Just don't sell the "Basic Interactive Kit" until you are completely done with the program, you use it with all the levels.

 

Amy

 


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#26 of 28 Old 05-30-2011, 05:46 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Cool, thanks!  FYI, I decided to order a copy of one of the Rewards books.  It also looks interesting to me and it was only $14ppd.  


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#27 of 28 Old 06-03-2011, 01:19 PM
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Cool, thanks!  FYI, I decided to order a copy of one of the Rewards books.  It also looks interesting to me and it was only $14ppd.  



If you think about it, could you post a review/update after using Rewards.  I am really curious about it.

 

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#28 of 28 Old 06-03-2011, 04:52 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I will AAK.  Unfortunately, I ordered the "kids kit" and now think I may also need the teacher's guide, which is about $100.  Grrr...  If I end up making it work I'll post a review for sure.  


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