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#1 of 21 Old 06-24-2011, 07:29 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Sorry it this will be a gloomy post. I just need to get these thoughts out... dd1 is almost 7 and dd2 is almost 5. Our struggles are with dd1. Dh and I wanted to hs our kids from birth. We both had only OK ps experience and were not happy with what ps had become. Cutting out all the "fun stuff", much longer days, larger class sizes etc. dd1 has spend some time is ps, 2 months K and again 3 months of 1st at a different school. The social aspect was too much for her. She would come home in tears and be moody for hrs each night. After taking her out of ps, she is a very different child, more happy (but still a serious child). BUT hosing is proving to be frustrating... for me, for her, for sister. dh likes the hsing life, he gets a happy child after work and  he doesn't have to MAKE her do homework. dd1 won't do anything academic. She is "naturally" at a K level in writing, reading, OK at math.... her reasoning and creativity are amazing!!! so there are positives. It strains our relationship when we sit down to do any school like work. Even if its only for 10 minutes, dd1 acts like its pulling teeth. The dream of hsing is not becoming a reality. I envisioned lots of field trips, reality: we got burnt out of the museum very quickly, weather is too nasty 7 months of the year to be outside, so the zoo, parks, beaches have to wait until summer anyways. Everything costs SO MUCH. dc are in an art and dance class. Those 2.5 hrs/week of "class socialization" is all we can afford. We have tried to mesh with a hs groups, but what we find is either religious or older kids. To sum it up, we were bored this year. Lots of time at home... dc play well together, but I am starting to see the negative effects of dd2 being bosses around by dd1 ALL day, and not being able to think for herself. And when dd1 does interact with kids her age or older she doesn't know how to NOT be the boss. I need some me time. I NEED to loose the 60 lbs I gained after having kids. We joined a gym with a "kids club child care" but dc HATE go there because they says "its full of screaming babies" which honestly it is. dd1 does not go to school. She says "all I do is sit and do work sheets and some kids are mean and loud". dd2 loved preschool (we did a co-op this past year) and I think she would like K well enough. Any thoughts?

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#2 of 21 Old 06-24-2011, 08:33 AM
 
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She's  only 7,  I can't even fathom why you would be forcing her to do homework in the first place.   It is just stressing you out and obviously isn't working for either of you.    Have you thought of new methods of introducing her to concepts.   Play  educational board games or  find free math games online.   I swear my oldest son taught himself to read on Starfall.   Eventually you can introduce more "school-type" work, but there is no reason to force it at an early age.

Per  the bossiness:   Some of this is just natural for her age.   My daughter went to public school and still didn't have a handle on how to not to try to "be the boss" of everyone.   Some kids are just naturally more inclined to lead than others and some kids follow.   I truly believe that you would see that dynamic play out in a sibling relationship, anyway.

Per the gym daycare:      My sons are 7 and 9 and they would object to that environment, also.    Older children aren't going to want to hang out in a preschool environment like that.  The care providers are often overwhelmed by sheer numbers and the older kids who can fend for themselves are usually ignored.   Can you think of ways to get your exercise as a family.  Swimming,  hiking, riding bikes?    I found a used treadmill marked down to $30 at a second hand sports store and will often jump on that and watch the boys play.    

I do understand the need for "me" time.  What about going to the gym after dh gets home, or  early in the morning before he leaves for work.

 


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#3 of 21 Old 06-24-2011, 08:38 AM
 
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I have been there! Lots of wise hsing mamas pointed out that it had a lot to do with my ds1 age at the time (right at 7 or a little before I really started to question if hs was the right thing). 

 

The more I read about child development the more I learned that our challenges then had a lot to do with the changes a child goes through, a "time if transition" that comes at that age.

 

We are through it and now ds1 is over 7 1/2 and wow, homeschooling has never felt better, for all of us. 

 

I think at all stages there will be developmental challenges that make me look at our decision to hs and question if it's the best thing. If I just focus on why we do it, and try really hard to remember all the positives, it really does work itself out in the end. We get through it.

 

ps. as for the gym, I have to work out to keep my sanity. I found that a great morning routine and rhythm helped give my dc a solid base so the afternoons could be more flexible (trips to the market, hit the gym, etc) without getting upset. Plus, afternoon gym time usually means much fewer babies. I let them know I just need an hour. 

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#4 of 21 Old 06-24-2011, 09:12 AM
 
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I am just starting down the hs path, so not any kids od expert by any means.  But here is my personal take after reading your post.

 

The reason to HS is if, in your particular circumstnaces, it works best for your family.  In my opinion if it isn't working and is making you unhappy, or if it is straining your relationship with your kids, then try something different.  The nice thing about PS is it is free.  If you decide to have them attend in the fall to see if it is a good fit (maybe your younger dc will love it, maybe your older one will get a great teacher, etc.).  If, after you start in the fall you then decide that it isn't working and you want to HS again you can.  No real harm done, and it didn't cost much money *maybe some required school supplies). 

 

Experiment until you find what works best for your family.  I don't think anyone should do anything, including homeschool, because they feel like they "should".  For some it is the best option, for others it isn't. 

 

Seems like the summer is a great time to experiment.  Without any "pressure" to cover any particular academic topics, maybe you could just see what kinds of approaches work best with your DCs.  As suggested above, games, etc.  Maybe without the feeling that you "have to" cover certain topics, you will feel freed up to use other approaches. 

 

I just believe that if any parenting choice is making one of the participants (including tha parent) unhappy, it needs to be changed.  An unhappy mama will end up an over-worked, depressed, resentful mama, and that isn't good for anyone.  Even your title "red flags it isn't working" tells me you need a break from it.

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#5 of 21 Old 06-24-2011, 11:13 AM
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If kindy is half day, perhaps you could enroll the younger child in that.  After the year, reevaluate.  

 

Your older dd doesn't seem to thrive in a ps environment.  I wouldn't try it again at this point unless you really feel that you need to do it for your own sanity.  However, I think that she is old enough to understand that she either cooperates or faces consequences.  This doesn't mean that you need to pile on worksheets or make school miserable!  But, establish some realistic guidelines and expect her to follow them.  Let her know that if mom gets way too stressed, then ps will be the only option for her.  At 7, perhaps have a bit of writing, a bit of math, play a game, and read together.  Make a chart so she sees what she has left.  Sign up for headsprout and have her do a lesson a day.  I like starfall too, but headsprout will keep track of lessons and you can give her an expectation to achieve:  "one lesson of headsprout/day".  Also, headsprout claims to have a "guarantee" of sorts.  You might try playing phonemic awareness games with her if she isn't quite ready for reading.  

 

You said that the hs groups are all religious or with older kids.  Are any of those older kids old enough to babysit?  Perhaps, you can hire one of them to come over a couple afternoons each week.  During that time you can workout and have a little time to yourself.  Or, if you can fine ONE other family that hs and that you get along with, perhaps you can swap afternoons.  The kids can play and the mom's take turns going out/me time/getting things done.

 

Amy


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#6 of 21 Old 06-25-2011, 04:02 AM
 
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I found 6 and 7 to be difficult ages.  IMO it is necessary to be doing some sit-down academic work but overall the day needs to be fun and interesting and relaxed.  I kept the written work to just reading, writing, and math, and just about ten minutes each, with breaks to do something else after each ten minutes.  I mixed in free art time and read-aloud books and stories, and some DVDs from Bill Nye or Schlessinger that I borrowed from the library.   I did school in the mornings and let the afternoons be for playing.

 

If you can afford it, our kids enjoy doing some work on the computer.  I have use Click'n Read, Click'n Spell, Dance Mat Typing (free !), Time 4 Learning, Dreambox Math, and Starfall (free !).  I would like to give them more online subscriptions but I've spent enough $$ on those for now.  They are a fun thing to add to the mix of activities though.


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#7 of 21 Old 06-25-2011, 11:46 AM
 
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Sounds like whatever curriculum you are using is not working. Try something else. There are plenty of other styles out there, other than "school at home". The "me time" thing is a separate issue.

Do they like it when you read to them? You might try a books-based curriculum like Five in a Row or Sonlight (can be used secular or religious). You could even get one level for both girls and do the same thing with both of them at the same time (saves you time and energy and money). I wouldn't expect much if any seatwork at this point. One thing, though, a books-based curriculum will mean you are spending time reading to them. You can't just park them in front of some worksheets and walk away to do your own thing. But even the time reading we take in little chunks here and there. Also consider what times during the day would be best. If you're trying to do stuff with them early in the day and they're better in the afternoon or evening, switch times. Or if they're better in the morning, make sure you do stuff in the morning.

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#8 of 21 Old 06-25-2011, 09:15 PM
 
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Young kids are natural unschoolers.  And some kids just won't have it any other way.  I think trying out this approach to seeing how well it works is such a great way to start.  Then, if you want more schedule, more "academics" you can add them in slowly.  It also sounds like she needs more de-schooling time, not jumping from one school to school-at-home.  That would give you a break, too.  Summertime is a perfect time to back yourself down from this difficult-to-maintain routine.  Then see where she needs a little help, and where she will accept it and go from there.

     As for socialization, I just to to let this one go.  My oldest is bossy, too, but then--surprise!--sometimes she suddenly isn't.  I've given up pushing socialization time and just get it when opportunity strikes.  Every year we will be doing different things, meeting different people.  We've stuck with gymnastics for a year now.  This fall I want to do the once-a-month family wilderness awareness class.  Next fall we'll try 4H and see how that works.  The girls have one really great friend, but except for park trips, that's it.  And they are fine with that.  They don't know that they are "supposed to" be running in packs.  Making it an issue gives her the signal that something is wrong, not "normal".

 

Give your family time to find its breath!

    


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#9 of 21 Old 06-26-2011, 05:21 AM
 
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Here's some suggestions on the childfree / workout end.  My kids are 6 and 7, so you might not be able to do all of this now, but soon.

 

Kids who are 6 can join the Boys and Girls Club for ... around here it's $35/year.  They can go there after school hours on school days.  It's only big kids.  Depending on the club they also get free enrichment classes (art, seasonal sports, swimming, etc).  You could then go to your fitness club.

 

 This year I have started occasionally taking them to a workout room (my parents have one in their condo), parking them in a corner with books / didj / drawing paper, and telling them to leave me alone for 30 minutes of cardio.  Basically they have to suck it up because it's important to the family that I am healthy. 

 

I can also park a child in one corner of the Y indoor track similarly, and go walking.  In your good weather season, you could put them in the middle of an outdoor track and have them play while you walk around the perimeter.  (Look behind middle and high schools when school is out.)

 

My kids have been swimming since birth, and are currently near the top of the pack competitively for their respective age groups, so I can swim laps while they play in a lifeguarded pool.  Obviously I can get a visual on them every minute between sets.  If you need to see them more often, you can use a kickboard for workouts and / or just grab the side and kick while you watch them the whole time.  Occasionally I enjoy jogging against the current in the lazy river of a playpool when the guards let me.

 

You could try a different fitness facility.  One of the Y's around here has a very large childcare area set up into two gated areas with a reception desk in the middle.  6+ goes to one side.  <6 goes to the other.  The activities and toys are different on the different sides.

 

Have you tried looking at county and church based youth activities to save money so they can do more classes and/or you can have more resources for working out?

 

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#10 of 21 Old 06-26-2011, 08:30 PM
 
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A lot of this is just going to depend on how you parent and your child's personality. Our kids are about the same age. Our older girl is difficult at times-- definitely acted like doing two seconds of work was  KILLING her.

 

We just got into the habit of doing something every weekday. It became a "no issue." You don't want to do this (tiny bit) of work? Well...we're going to remember this later when you want to do X. X will not happen.

 

My daughter really started to do better when we got workbooks (For example, Explode the Code) and she could literally see how far she was progressing. She definitely enjoys things such as "I'm on page 67! WOW! Page 92 is the last page!"

 

Of course, we have days where we do the bare minimum (2 pages of Explode the Code is the minimum), and that's fine. But...you know your child. I know that my child tends to be a whiner/complainer (about everything) and that she wants to be in control. And that's why I have to be more stern with her-- whining/complaining/moaning is not going to help our days.

 

What are you wanting out of your days? The grass can definitely be greener... I think you just need to find the happy medium that's going to work. I'm not going to lie-- some of the more unschooly approaches would NOT work in our household...so I'd never try them. I know that we need structure...and it helps us.

 

Don't give up yet.


Welcome to the Real World she said to me, condescendingly, take a seat. Take your life; plot it out in black and white.
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#11 of 21 Old 06-27-2011, 01:08 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KimPM View Post

Sounds like whatever curriculum you are using is not working. Try something else. There are plenty of other styles out there, other than "school at home". The "me time" thing is a separate issue.

Do they like it when you read to them? You might try a books-based curriculum like Five in a Row or Sonlight (can be used secular or religious). You could even get one level for both girls and do the same thing with both of them at the same time (saves you time and energy and money). I wouldn't expect much if any seatwork at this point. One thing, though, a books-based curriculum will mean you are spending time reading to them. You can't just park them in front of some worksheets and walk away to do your own thing. But even the time reading we take in little chunks here and there. Also consider what times during the day would be best. If you're trying to do stuff with them early in the day and they're better in the afternoon or evening, switch times. Or if they're better in the morning, make sure you do stuff in the morning.

What she said.  
I have to make/keep school fun to keep my busy/spirited 7yo boy interested and excited about it.  To where my 5yo and 3yo are quite excited about school, and they're all happy to tell anyone who asks that they're homeschooled.  :D  If he feels like school is a huge, endless chore (much how I feel about the dirty clothes and messes he makes, go figure), I shelve it to come back to later or find a different approach.  Right now our sticking point is handwriting, but I'm being rather lax about it until he learns to read and it's more exciting to be writing letters to his aunts and grandmas.  I mean, if I'm explaining to the 7yo and 5yo the concept of Latin root words (on their request after some discussion hubby and I had in front of them), I can't be screwing up too much, you know?

Fwiw, I think the oldest kids do tend to be kinda bossy.  I have a friend with a 7.5yo girl, and my oldest is a 7.5yo boy.  Those two... sigh.  My friend and I couldn't have our two headstrong kids together in the same house for a playdate for a good three years.  Seriously, it was *that* bad.

 

I hear you on things costing a pretty penny.  It hasn't been until this year that we could afford swimming lessons (which is more one of those need-to-know survival things), but now we have three in lessons which adds up.  So that's all we're doing for the forseeable future.  It happens.  Do you have any interests or anything that you all can do to help keep you all busy during the day?  I have my kids constantly learning how to do things around the house (this week I managed to find a Dustbuster, so they're in charge of cleaning up dry messes), we have a garden, we do a bunch of canning, house repair, truck/car repair, wood-cutting, cooking from scratch, regular overnight visitors like Grandma and so on.  It's rarely dull or boring around here with all that going on.


As for the me-time...  Sometimes I have a friend watch my older three (babe is still nursing) so I can do things like paint a room or organize the pantry or just catch up on laundry mountain without my helpers.  When you're with the kids all day every day, sometimes you do need a little break to recharge.  I know that's part of why several friends send their kids off to school, honestly.

 


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#12 of 21 Old 06-28-2011, 05:52 AM
 
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Something to consider-- in some countries, and in some alternative schooling systems, formal schooling does not even start until what we would consider 2nd grade.

 

So it's perfectly acceptable to not do ANY academic work before age 7 or so.  

 

Even if you're not planning to be unschoolers and seriously believe in the importance of academics, there is no NEED to PUSH it at an early age.  Others have referenced a "change" that happens around age 7.  Waldorf talks about this -- and while they put some woowoo-metaphysical meaning behind it, the observation of the change is, at least, well-based in reality.  Before about age 7, kids are fanciful... they believe in Santa Claus and fairies and their imaginary friends.  Around age 7, they start questioning, they start moving into 'reality' and becoming intellectually curious.  

 

Seven is just an average, it can be earlier or later, but it's around then.  And when they're going through that transition, they can become quite contrary... it's rather a shocking thing to move into reality!!!  :)  You'll find LOTS and LOTS of stories of parents complaining about their 7yo's attitudes!!

 

So if I were you, I'd take some time to relax, to 'deschool' and just play together and let them play independently.  Follow your kids' interests -- if one of them asks, one day, "mom, how does this spider make a web?" then you can say "hmm, let's find out" and look up videos online or go to the library and get some books, but DON'T PUSH anything on them.  Re-connect with them on a level of curiosity and understanding with no *expectations*.

 

Then once you've been doing that for awhile, and things have calmed down and the kids feel better, THEN you can suggest to them (or at least the older one) the idea of bringing in some academic stuff again.  Work WITH them to choose a curriculum they'll like... there are SO many options in terms of philosophies and pedagogical approaches, from Charlotte Mason to Classical to, of course, unschooling, and so many curriculum resource options within the different philosophies.  Use your 'non-academic vacation' to research different approaches and get an idea of what might fit with your kids' personalities and learning styles.  Even if you end up not using any particular 'style', just learning about the hows and whys of them helps you to not be as 'stuck' on the whole "replicating school at home" idea.

 

You mention that both you and your DH were unhappy with your public school experiences, so why try to recreate that at home?  Homeschooling can be so much more than simply moving the academics from one building to a different one.  It can be an entirely different approach to learning.  So I suggest doing a lot of investigation into alternative homeschooling models while taking a break from academics, then come back to things relaxed and refreshed in a few months.  :)


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#13 of 21 Old 06-28-2011, 06:08 AM
 
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Opt for more hands on activities.Avoid the worksheets unless your children like them.Sign up for free classes at your local library and park system. Keep an online account with various homeschooling groups.One day there will be emails popping up from families of younger ones.I have not homeschooled in 3 years,but I am still checking out the homeschool group activites. I hear you about the lack of other kids and the siblings only having each other.Even with my kids IN school there is still this issue once they get home from school.

 

Don't give up just yet.Keep trying things until you find what works.Create your own homeschool outing group and keep it going even if there is no response at first.

 

Sign the kids up for classes at the local Y/gym you joined.

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#14 of 21 Old 06-28-2011, 08:25 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Thank you all for your replies. I need to be a bit more realistic in my belief that NO situation will be perfect for all of us at the same time. We all know that we are more suited for hsing than ps though. So its a good stating point to work on making hsing work better, than thinking about going to ps. We will take a break this summer and see where we are in the fall and what hsing groups we are able to get involved with, classes to sign up for and "child care" options for a ME break.

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#15 of 21 Old 06-28-2011, 10:45 AM
 
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I think ultimately you should do what you feel is best. But some of the suggestions you have received already are things that I too have tried with my oldest two and some work and some do not. My oldest child was easy when he was homeschooled. I miss him. lol. My 9 yr old daughter not so much. I love her, she's my baby girl, but she is not good at being homeschooled. I too struggle with this type of thing. She went to kindergarten at a private school and after that we removed her and I homeschooled her since then. As she has gotten older it has gotten wayyyy harder. She gets bored easily, is bossy, deamnding, hyper, strongwilled, etc. and the list goes on. I love, love, love her and this isn't about her, it's about her education. I often question myself and think what will it look like if she gets a few years older and is still behind? :(  She is behind in some areas compared to other 9 yr olds in our area that attend schools outside their homes. She is a very smart child, taught herself to read and spell but math and writing and language arts are tough areas for her. At times I just know she needs an educated "professional" teaching her. Then the other side kicks in and tells me nope, she is able to learn at home just as she has since she was 6 years old. It's all in my head, trying to conform with the rest of society. But I don't know. I am currently checking out schools in the area. I have to rely on financial aid as we will only use private schools. My ex-husband and I are against public schooling for our daughter right now. We too decided many moons ago that we would not send any of our children to school but we got divorced last year and that changed everything! :( Made it all harder it seems. Anyway, I didn't help much but I can symphathize with you. I am in a similar spot. I don't want to go too much longer homeschooling and watching my 9 yr old get farther behind when she could very well be in a school excelling with the proper educator. But I just despise all the classroom crap and rules and long days and then homework on top of all that. *sigh* It's tough. So, I know what you are going through right now.


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#16 of 21 Old 07-01-2011, 11:37 AM
 
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I have kids a similar age, I can tell you what (kind of ;-)  works for us, but of course every situation is different. 

 

Bascially, we have a cast iron routine each morning that comes down to every morning we are in the house (this includes weekends if there is no particular plan), ds (7) does some form of schoolwork. dd1 is 5, but she is in steiner kindergarten part time so although I will work with her if she asks, she doesn't have to do it atm .

 

The exact form the work takes does vary day to day, but always some maths, always some kind of language work (but this could be reading, spelling or handwriting), normally some kind of violin practice (we are between teachers atm so I have a lot of freedom here) and then a video of some kind at the end. This lot normally takes about 2 1/2 to 3 hours, including a break in the middle to let off steam. This year is his first year of hsing and its been a lot about getting him up to speed with reading, writing and arithmatic. Next year I think we'll be broader.

 

The key for me has been consistency, making it clear that this is what we do every single day, so there is no debate. 

 

I write up what he needs to do each morning on a blackboard, along with the time that I expect him to spend. For some stuff, he can work independently, and he can choose when to do that.

 

We also have afternoon stuff that he likes most days, and we simply do not do it until his schoolwork is done.

 

For me, with a child who came out of steiner kindergarten both quite behind and not especially interested in maths or reading, it was really important to me to get him quite fast to the stage where he could learn independently. I found that at first he HATED it. He was used to playing all day, and while I did ease him in gently, any sort of sit down work was a big culture shock. He still often hates actually doing the work, but he does really like being homeschooled, and he does really like being able to read and being actually very good at maths, knowing cool stuff like fibonacci and pythagoras and his tables and so on. 

 

 

 

 

I also have a very bossy 7 year old-I'm convinced its an oldest kids thing, as every single oldest child I know is bossy, but no way round it, its not helped by being homeschooled. Dunno there. I've struggled with this a lot. Its not a great social trait, tbh, and with ds we've talked a lot about how other kids don't like it (they really don't). I also nip it in the bud where I see it. 7 is old enough to discuss these things, I think, and stand up for your younger child.


Raising Geek_Generation_2.0 :LET ds= 10 ; LET dd1= ds - 2; LET dd2=dd-2; IF month=0.67 THEN LET ds = ds+1; 
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#17 of 21 Old 07-02-2011, 09:37 AM
 
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I have had the same issues with my son who is now 9. Nothing has really helped and DS strongly just wants to be radically unschooled. I try to get a break by sending him with other people, the grandparents usually, who are fresher and can take him to do things so I have alone time with the younger kids and teach in ways different from me. It offers DS a lot I think. DS wants to apprentice. It's not too hard to find people who have a talent who are willing to work with him. Other things are the homeschool gym classes at the Y. Other than that he just wants to play with friends and be in total control of his whole day. Rigid schedules and withholding privledges only results in him screaming all day and still not doing any school work. We have managed to start a small secular group and get the kids together, all ages, to do experiments and projects. He will tolerate a short fun lesson with other a few other kids around especially since he has play time afterwards. Find just two other kids to have over to do a fun lesson together, it's cheap too. He likes going to the library, playing educational computer and video games and watching educational TV shows. He also likes researching his questions online.

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#18 of 21 Old 07-28-2011, 12:25 AM
 
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Wow-- I can relate very much to your post!

 

Academics: I am very relaxed about this.  What do children really "need" to know?  I have debated this for a long time, esp. when I went into teaching.  My oldest does not like being directed, but for my sake I do some math with her every once in awhile.  Today we did some, but we did it together the whole time so that she was actually being taught with immediate feedback.  I kept it short and sweet.  She was much more open to it vs. how she was even at 7.  (She is 9 now.)  Sit back and watch the show she will give you if you let her!  In a few years, try again with a little more direction IF you feel you need it.  The less I push the more I see. 

 

Social aspect: I hear you.  We have the same issues, though we only find younger children.  Maybe we should switch locations!  This is my #1 problem, so no help there.  We are joining a co-op, so maybe new friends but they will all be very far.

 

Working out: Yes, yes.  I joined the Y so that we could all swim and DD could go to hs swim class.  Thought I could work out w/my toddler in day care.  She never wanted to go.  Cancelled it!  Now I think I will get some DVDs and stick with those . . .

 

Visions of going out: YES!  Same weather problem here.  I love summer, but the bad weather is so bad most of the year.  Wish we had more indoor places.  Thought about joining the Y in the fall and just going swimming with them a lot, but in Dec. I'll have a new baby, so no way to take the toddler and new baby in the pool.  One thing I am doing is focusing on 2-3 hour trips.  If we go SOMEWHERE every day for just that amount of time, it's good.  I am also trying to think of how we can use late spring, summer, and most of fall for going out, and then settling in for crafts and at-home time in the winter.  Then I will not feel like I need to go out "all year" but hopefully most of it.

 

 


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#19 of 21 Old 07-29-2011, 11:42 AM
 
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I have a 7 year old and a 2 year old.  We have/had some of the same problems.  I was getting a lot of attitude about school work until about May.  What helped was 1)being very consistent 2)

she could see the results when she started reading and 3) she turned 7.

 

 

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#20 of 21 Old 07-29-2011, 02:00 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seeking Refuge View Post

She's  only 7,  I can't even fathom why you would be forcing her to do homework in the first place.  


Per the gym daycare:      My sons are 7 and 9 and they would object to that environment, also.    Older children aren't going to want to hang out in a preschool environment like that.  The care providers are often overwhelmed by sheer numbers and the older kids who can fend for themselves are usually ignored.   Can you think of ways to get your exercise as a family.  Swimming,  hiking, riding bikes?    I found a used treadmill marked down to $30 at a second hand sports store and will often jump on that and watch the boys play.    
 


OP here. HW was when dd1 went to ps. It was not optional, unless she wanted to be subjected to ridicule from the teacher in front of the class as one of the kids who did not do hw.

 

I canceled out gym membership and bought a used exercise bike. I'm finding I enjoy working out at home more anyways, and it sets a good example for my dc.

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#21 of 21 Old 07-29-2011, 11:00 PM
 
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So sad.  Homework is such a waste of time anyway.  That is terrible about the teacher!  My niece had to write a letter of apology to the class if she did not do homework, even if she got a letter of excuse from her parents.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jeteaa View Post


 


OP here. HW was when dd1 went to ps. It was not optional, unless she wanted to be subjected to ridicule from the teacher in front of the class as one of the kids who did not do hw.

 

 



 


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