is it possilbe to combine classical, waldory and still partially unschool? - Mothering Forums

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Old 08-19-2011, 01:30 PM - Thread Starter
 
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i like the idea of the well-roundedness of classical, the natural pace of waldor, and the openness of unschooling. has anyone else combined these successfully? any pointers/ideas?

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Old 08-19-2011, 04:48 PM
 
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You can do whatever you want and call it eclectic but unschooling won't fit in to that. You can't partially unschool, it's an all or nothing philosophy. You either believe your children should be completely in charge of their own learning or you don't.
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Old 08-20-2011, 04:01 PM
 
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My kiddo's not even 2, so I have no experience with homeschooling, unschooling, any of it, but you described the approach I've been thinking about (yeah, way ahead of time, I know...) using with her. I'm still researching, learning, etc. about homeschooling, but I feel it would be totally possible to use the structure from classical education to teach writing, reading and math, and use an unschooling approach towards science, social studies, art, music, etc. Let the child choose what and how to learn and follow their enthusiasm. I'm not familiar with Waldorf, so I have no idea where that would fit in. That might not "really" be unschooling, but if you're kid is learning and enjoying that learning, that's what matters, right?

Then again, like I said, I really have no experience and I'm always willing to learn more.

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Old 08-21-2011, 06:11 PM
 
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There are actually different 'levels' of unschooling... the folks that you might call "radical unschoolers" may well say "you either let your children be completely in charge or you don't", but in practical terms, lots of folks are near-unschoolers or unschool-influenced.  You could argue about the semantics of it, and it's true that those who are 100% child-led unschoolers are doing things differently than others.  But you will find lots of folks who say something like "We unschool everything, except for math," or "we unschooled until she was 8, then gradually started introducing curriculum."

 

If you get too persnickety about labels, though, then what do you call the kid who, 100% unschooled, says "I want to do a rigorous curriculum"?  Are they still 'unschooled' even if they're using curriculum, even though it was their choice?  

 

I believe it's possible to carry unschool influences and philosophies into a lifestyle that uses some curriculum.  Schooling can be about more than just academics, too.  Did you teach your kids to brush their teeth?  Fold their clothes?  Roll out a pie crust?  Use the dishwasher?  Cross the street?  Put on their bike helmet?  All these 'life skills' are just as important to their education as academics.  Many hard-core unschoolers actively teach these things, rather than just wait for the child to ask for it.  Others wait.  So I'd say there are degrees in unschooling, with the difference being where your 'cutoff' point is, what are the things that you WILL teach them no matter what -- and that outside of those specific things, the child is in charge.

 

Anyway, back to your original question.  It's certainly possible to combine different homeschooling philosophies.  Some combinations work better than others.  Some combinations, you will have to compromise on certain aspects of a philosophy in order to fit with the other.  You can get into semantics, again... purists will say you can't do classical if you're doing waldorf, because there is a VERY different emphasis in the early grades.  You certainly can't do pure classical AND pure waldorf at the same time.

 

But, you can take elements that you like from each, and make your own philosophy.  

 

It can be argued that a particular philosophy works best when you embrace it completely.  That way, there's no conflict, no contradictions, no confusions.  And there's a lot of sense to that.

 

But... if you don't like 100% of a philosophy, don't agree with it, whatever, but you like certain aspects of it... then yeah, make it your own.  The philosophies are not religious... they are strategies and methodologies for incorporating education into a child's life.  But they are not the ONLY ways.  

 

In our house, we combine bits and pieces of waldorf, montessori, charlotte mason, unit studies, school-at-home, and - yes - unschooling.  We're obviously not 'purists' in any one of these!  But I've researched and studied each one of them, and learned so much from each one.  They all got absorbed into my brain, and then I use aspects of what I've learned in various areas of our homeschooling.  So, if a particular issue comes up, I might say "this is something that a Waldorf approach would work really well with solving", for instance.  

 

Montessori informed my daughter's toddlerhood, the emphasis on practical skills and calm, focused, self-chosen activities.  Waldorf is heavily influencing her preschool/kindergartenhood, we do circle times and poems and songs and she plays with playsilks and we learn about nature and most of her time is completely self-directed creative play.  Like, you know, unschooling, in that respect.  :)  But because she's interested and asking for it, we're not making her wait until she's 7 to learn to read and count, like 'pure' waldorf would.  RightStart Math is based on Montessori, and we're using some typical school-at-home curricula for some areas, unit studies for others.  But we keep the unschooling influence in that I don't schedule ANYTHING for her.  I make suggestions, sometimes, but we only do stuff if she's interested and wants to.  

 

As she starts writing more, we'll do charlotte mason narrations, dictations, and copywork.  Maybe a nature journal.  Probably keep up with waldorfy approaches for a lot of things... we'll see.  

 

My older son, we waffled between rigid school-at-home and radical unschooling, neither of which really seemed to work for him, until he was 9 or 10.  That's when I learned about charlotte mason, and that suddenly made a HUGE difference for him.  Then when he was 11 or 12, we spent the better part of a year doing a lot of waldorf-inspired things -- adding waldorf colours to his charlotte mason.  Rather than a typical cm narration, he'd do a drawing with beeswax crayons in his 'good book'.  This worked beautifully for that year, then he needed to move on to something different as he grew and changed.  

 

The unschooling influence also plays out for us in the sense that we don't worry about fitting any particular schedules... if we need to take 3 weeks off completely, for instance, we don't worry about it.  :)

 

 

 


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Old 08-21-2011, 07:32 PM
 
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We have combined those and others over the years. We started in kindergarten with a very unschool approach, we played with the things from Waldorf we liked and also did some story extenders and read lots of books, because dd liked to be read to. Each year the list of classical subjects has gotten longer. In first grade we did handwriting and Anciet history as our only formal lessons- history because dd loved it, and handwriting because I felt it was important. Each year we have added one or 2 more subjects to the formal list instead of unschooling list. This year is fourth grade and we are doing spelling and grammar for the first time as formal lessons, we will also do math, spanish, and a formal science program. Dd loves science and has unschooled it every year doing tons of various experiments and kits and exploring it in tons if ways, but this fall we are going to try a more structured approach and see if she likes it. We also do literature, but mostly because we enjoy it.

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Old 08-22-2011, 04:04 AM
 
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This summer we started hs'ing for the first time my rising 2nd grader and my second son who is doing both K/1st grade work, and I think we've combined some of what you mention.  Our spine is classical for reading, writing, grammar, spelling, history and math; we took an unschooling approach for science (I am designing my own curriculum, since I have a son who loves dinosaurs, and we are using a timeline about the beginning of the universe/earth up to man, covering dinosaurs in a huge chunk); and I am teaching an invention convention class in our co-op to 5-8 yr olds for my other son who loves inventing things.  Then I sat down and actually planned out our daily schedule a la charlotte mason--every subject will be covered in 15 min, we are only schooling in the mornings up until noon, so most of the afternoons will be spent with free play time outdoors (if I can work 6 hrs of outdoors time for my active boys, that will be awesome!)  BTW I agree with the previous poster about the nuances of each individual approach and making them work together.  We felt the classical approach for the early years with writing/dictation/narration to be important for developing skills with our boys, but since we are hs'ing we want flexibility with working on their own interests/talents (hence our pre-history for science and the weekly invention class).  I love the CM approach of tackling many subjects in short periods of time, but I haven't tried out the new schedule yet to really see if it will work.  Overall I'm new at all this though and still asking may q's myself ;)

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Old 08-22-2011, 04:44 AM
 
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Originally Posted by tankgirl73 View Post

If you get too persnickety about labels, though, then what do you call the kid who, 100% unschooled, says "I want to do a rigorous curriculum"?  Are they still 'unschooled' even if they're using curriculum, even though it was their choice?


That's exactly what it means. Unschooled doesn't mean you aren't using a curriculum. It just means that it's the student's choice. If you aren't using a curriculum it doesn't mean you are unschooling. I'm not an unschooler but I've read enough threads on the debate to know what it means.
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Old 08-22-2011, 07:58 AM
 
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I think it is.  The tricky one is USing - but that depends on your definition of USing.

 

I think it is acceptable in USing to offer up an activity (which could be Waldorf, classical, etc) inspired - but if the child is not interested you acknowledge this is their learning process and you shelve the idea until they are.  In some cases they may never want to do it.  Tweaking may happen before backing off.  

 

Example - I like the idea of timelines as discussed in classical education.  Several years ago I invited the kids to help me create a timeline to put up on the wall. They had the option of saying yes or no, so I think it fits in with USing.  It was definitely borrowed from Classical education though.

 

In a nutshell that is how we work.  If I want to explore something outside their interests, I offer it up and see if they bite.  It has worked well when they are younger, it worked a little less well when they are older  (say 11 plus), but that is life.  My two older kids have moved  onto exploring education in more formal ways - that has been their choice and what they seemed to need.  

 

 

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Old 08-22-2011, 10:28 AM
 
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Originally Posted by meandk0610 View Post

i like the idea of the well-roundedness of classical, the natural pace of waldor, and the openness of unschooling. has anyone else combined these successfully? any pointers/ideas?


I was really drawn to Waldorf initially when my girls were tiny, but I was too much of an unschooler to become a Waldorf family.  The elements we used were: 

     *delayed academics (except when dd1 wanted to read/do/talk about it)

     *focusing on imaginative toys (no "educational toys", video games) and ones that were as open-ended, beautiful and well made as possible (even plastic, many of them)

     *welcoming children into the daily activities of life (very, very unschoolish!)

     *discovering the natural world in an open-ended way rather than an academic way

     *Understanding children's development a la Steiner.  Hands.  Heart.  Head.  This has helped me direct my approach when the girls ask for my help.

     *Honoring the imaginative world of young children.  Honoring their attachments.

     *honoring the rhythms of the year, in our own way.  (County fair, anyone?  Maypole, winter solstice, Christmas, trips to the beach in August, etc.)

I used asterisks which make all this sound definitive and separate, but they're all kind of squishy and amorphous.  The delayed academics philosophy gave me confidence that I needn't start focusing on these things.  Sure, my kids asked for alphabet books and Anno's Math Games books and I didn't hesitate, but if they went weeks without anything remotely academic I didn't melt into a gooey pile of doubt.  Starting off studying the philosophy of Waldorf gave me some confidence to end up unschooling.  I visited the nearby Waldorf school kindergarten.  It was then I knew that although I thought waldorf was a beautiful idea, the way it honored childhood which seems to be out of fashion these days, this was still a school.  Not only did I return to wanting to homeschool, I realized that I wanted to honor dd1's delight in science/math/facts.    

     So, in some ways I didn't combine the two, but Waldorf did help ease me into a confidence about unschooling that I might not have had before.

 

     I'm not sure what you mean exactly when you refer to "classical" but I will say that our reading material is very eclectic, and I don't shy away from reading the big classics.  That's how we honor the "classical".  And if you take some lessons, you are likely to run into this approach as well-- violin lessons, ballet.  Even gymnastics has a very definite progression that could be classified as that.

 

     Whether you have success with combining these methods depends on the child.  I prefer to start by unschooling.  This way you can see a child's personality clearly, I think.  You'll notice the child that craves schedules and "schoolish" work.  You'll notice the child that wants to learn with her hands and not sit at a table.  I notice my girls learning without any pressure from me.  They *want* to read the clock, use money, add up the dice, measure and count things, identify things, grow things, make things.  I try to honor that instead of fitting it in to a philosophy.  

 

     So, instead of designing these things in your head, learn what you can about the philosophies that inspire you, and watch your kids.  Do the things you love, bring home books about things that inspire your own curiosity.  Be curious together.  This homeschooling journey isn't just about your kids.  Teach yourself, too, and they might come along for the ride.

 

     In a rambling way, I'm trying to say that I would watch and wait.  Do what brings joy, nurtures curiosity, opens up the world to you and your kids.

 



Quote:
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You can do whatever you want and call it eclectic but unschooling won't fit in to that. You can't partially unschool, it's an all or nothing philosophy. You either believe your children should be completely in charge of their own learning or you don't.


I would agree in the sense that you couldn't fit into the "unschooling" category, but that doesn't mean that unschooling can't inspire your approach.  Just as Waldorf inspired our approach.  And there are those that argue that Waldorf is also all-or-nothing.  There are those that argue that you can't combine Waldorf and homeschooling even.  And a "classical education" not something that you can insert as you please, either.

 

But I say *WHATEVER*.    moon.gif ("Whatever!" says my little emoticon!)

 


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Old 08-22-2011, 12:33 PM
 
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That's exactly what it means. Unschooled doesn't mean you aren't using a curriculum. It just means that it's the student's choice. If you aren't using a curriculum it doesn't mean you are unschooling. I'm not an unschooler but I've read enough threads on the debate to know what it means.


I agree completely... But that was my point, actually.  :)  Some folks' definition of unschooling says that as soon as you're "doing" anything, then you're not unschooling.  Viz. the reply early on in this thread.  

 

But if unschooling primarily means "child-led" (which is the definition I prefer), then you can still have elements of various homeschooling philosophies. You almost have to, really.  If your unschooled child approaches you and says "I want to learn some math" (not that they'd necessarily say it like that heh, but for the sake of argument) -- you still have to decide "okay, how are we going to approach this?"  The child can have some part in the process of deciding the right approach, but they can't know the pros and cons and benefits and drawbacks of all the different approaches.  You, as the parent, must do some research and some decision-making.  If you're very democratic and staunchly child-led, you might even leave the final decision to the child -- "okay, we can use this boxed curriculum which will work this way, has these benefits, and these drawbacks, or we can use this other approach where we create lessons following this philosophy, it has these pros and these cons."  But in the end, whether you chose it or your child chose it, you're following a particular educational/pedagogical philosophy for learning that your child requested.

 

Or bringing it back to the original poster's question:  If a child somehow says "I want to do Waldorf for most of our day, but when I turn 6 I'd like to start some classical kind of work in certain areas" -- and you adopt those philosophies as a response to the child -- then by that definition of unschooling, you're still unschooling.  Thus, doing Waldorf, classical, and unschooling concurrently.

 

To go one step further, the child might not be able to express verbally their preference for a particular style, or of course have enough of an understanding of different styles to even accurately know what works best with them.  The fact is, children have to try something before they understand it.  An attentive parent could very easily recognize that due to their child's personality, a particular style would be welcomed by them and be an ideal method of helping them achieve their potential.  An unschooling parent would not then FORCE this style on the child, but could very well test the waters, make suggestions, see how the child responds, and go with that.  This is, IMO, not really any different than responsive parenting in any other area of life -- reading their cues of when they're hungry when they're infants, when they're tired when they're toddlers, what kind of sleeping situation (bed-sharing, room-sharing, crib sleeping etc) is best suited to this individual child, when they need to pee if you're ECing, etc etc.  All that is entirely child-led, but the parent is still actively engaging and making decisions on the child's behalf, based on their observations of what the best choice would be for that child when they're as yet unable to understand or communicate that choice themselves.  

 

I do that sort of thing all the time with my kids, I'll come across something I think they'd love, which they would NEVER have come across on their own (say, if it's something I found while browsing forums like this one ;)  ), and then I will bring it to their attention and gauge their response.  If their response is enthusiastic, we'll do it.  So that's something that I chose and that is maybe curriculum-ish, but it's still at the very minimum "unschooling inspired", since they had a large part in the decision of whether or not to actually do it.  

 

I agree that the barrier between unschooling and not, can be amorphous and tricky to define.  Especially in how it will play out differently in different families' day-to-day lives.  But precisely because it is so amorphous... it can mean different things to different families.  So for one family, they might be perfectly happy thinking "our homeschool has many elements of unschooling to it", and someone else looks at them and says "you're not unschooling at all."  In the end, they're both right, by their own definitions.  :)  As long as the end result is a homeschool situation that parents and kids are happy with, then what does it matter what you call it?  

 

(BTW, I'm actually not an advocate for abolishing all labels.  I believe labels are enormously valuable.)

 

I dunno.  Maybe it's like if someone wants to live off-the-grid, but can't give up certain luxuries/essentials/whatever, and so they have a huge garden and solar cells on their roof and recycles their grey water... but they are on a city water line, use a regular flush toilet, and buy some processed food in the winter.  Some purist might say "you're not really living off-grid", and sure, they're not as COMPLETELY off-grid as they could be, but they're certainly inspired by the idea of off-grid and have included the idea in all their decision-making.  I dunno if that's a great analogy, but it's working for me right now lol... If someone can be "partially off-grid", then someone can "partially unschool".  ;)


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Old 08-22-2011, 01:27 PM
 
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No, I think that classical education and unschooling run counter to each other. Waldorf ideas could be blended in with some of the classical education things, I suppose.


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Old 08-22-2011, 01:51 PM
 
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Originally Posted by phathui5 View Post

No, I think that classical education and unschooling run counter to each other. Waldorf ideas could be blended in with some of the classical education things, I suppose.


While I have heard USy sorts say they blend in things from classical, I have never heard a classical adherent claiming to blend in USing.  

 

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Old 08-22-2011, 11:34 PM
 
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Sometimes classical education can be so regimented and scheduled that it doesn't leave time to explore a childs interests.  Being flexible and taking an active interest in what your child is interested in is the principle that you are wanting to bring into your homeschool practice.  Being willing to take an "unschooling break" from your more traditional workload for a couple of weeks to allow your children to explore a topic is a great thing.  I think that following your childs personality, their interests and your instincts is the best way to homeschool no matter what you label it.

 

Waldorf can definitely be incorporated into any type of education.  Art, hand work, cooking, creative play, songs etc etc are all wonderful and fun additions

 

Here's what my 2nd grader will be doing this year:

 

Magic Tree House-She reads the chapter book, then we explore and do a project on the book.  She picks the direction and I try to use all my available resources to help her learn more about it.  Sometimes we spend just a little bit of time, sometimes we spend a lot.  Sometimes she does a reenactment of a scene, sometimes she make a lapbook, or sometimes we even take a fieldtrip to a museum.

 

Writing/spelling- She loves to wirte, she does this every day on her own.  I help her with her spelling and sometimes give her silly prompts to write about or give her a list of words to include all in the same story.

 

Science- Science sometimes gets mixed in with the MTH, othertimes she does experiments with Dad.  This year we are going to put together a field journal for our hikes and work on butterfly, bird and plant identification.

 

Math-  She doesn't feel like she "did school' with out a bit of paper work (bleck!) so I give her a mathbook each year.  Whatevs, it's what the girl wants.

 

PE- She plays soccer, ballet, rock climbs at the gym, dodgeball at the gym and goes for hikes with us.  PE is totally child led around here, it's not even something I think about!

 

Art- Art is everyday in many ways, knitting, looming, painting, drawing, illustrating her stories, sewing, embrodery, whatever we feel like really.

 

Spanish- My daughter has been dying to leave spanish, we tried a bit last year, but didn't have much success.  She got to go to Mexico for a week with Dad for Mission work and is now really trying to teach herself.  We got her Muzzie and Rosseta Stone to help with this.  Hopefully she will go back again next summer.

 

 

I also have a preschooler who is very different from my 2nd grader.  She is 4.5 and is a wild one.  We will be doing hands on manipulitives, lots of waldorfy art, bread baking, songs and even a bit page work b/c she wants to be "big" like sissy.

 

Hope all this helps in some way, I would say we do a mix of traditional, waldorf, and child led (or unschooling) learning.


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Old 08-30-2011, 06:51 AM
 
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Thank you TankGirl for typing out all the words forming in my head as a I read this thread. We combine these things (although I'm sure I can't really claim the classical label since I haven't read and probably won't ever read the Well Trained Mind) and still identify as unschoolers. I "strew" in the unschooling sense different activities just as I would anything else and DD is either interested or she is not. Sometimes she seems not to be but asks me about it again sometime later.

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Old 08-30-2011, 12:49 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SweetSilver View Post

I was really drawn to Waldorf initially when my girls were tiny, but I was too much of an unschooler to become a Waldorf family.  The elements we used were: 

     *delayed academics (except when dd1 wanted to read/do/talk about it)

     *focusing on imaginative toys (no "educational toys", video games) and ones that were as open-ended, beautiful and well made as possible (even plastic, many of them)

     *welcoming children into the daily activities of life (very, very unschoolish!)

     *discovering the natural world in an open-ended way rather than an academic way

     *Understanding children's development a la Steiner.  Hands.  Heart.  Head.  This has helped me direct my approach when the girls ask for my help.

     *Honoring the imaginative world of young children.  Honoring their attachments.

     *honoring the rhythms of the year, in our own way.  (County fair, anyone?  Maypole, winter solstice, Christmas, trips to the beach in August, etc.)


Do look at Charlotte Mason. It fits with a lot of what you're attracted to in Waldorf.

 

Delayed academics - While many modern CM followers start "Year 1" at age 6, as is typical for US first grade, the original CM approach started formal academics at age 7, encouraging lots of outdoor exploration and play before that. Early years focus heavily on reading aloud quality literature and separating out the mechanics of writing from the creative/analytical (copywork to practice handwriting, oral narratives for developing thoughts) rather than trying to combine the two.

 

Welcoming children into the daily activities of life/imaginative toys - CM places an emphasis on handicrafts - making beautiful, well-made, useful things rather than typical arts and crafts. This seems to fit with both these goals.

 

Honoring the rhythms of the year/discovering the natural world in an open-ended way rather than an academic way - CM encourages nature study - observing your surroundings during different seasons.

 

CM is a classical approach. Not Well-Trained Mind classical, but stemming from the same roots. Both Waldorf and WTM resources could easily be integrated into a CM-style curriculum.

 

Most of the CM resources out there are Christian and relatively academically oriented, but it's an educational philosophy, not a set sequence, and it is easy to incorporate either WTM or Waldorf resources.

 

http://www.amblesideonline.org/,  http://simplycharlottemason.com/, and http://www.tanglewoodeducation.com/ are some good starting points for more info. http://www.weefolkart.com/ is another good one (though more CM/Waldorf-influenced than strict CM or Waldorf), especially if you have very young kids.

 

Unschooling - I try not to let formal academics interfere with natural enthusiasms :) If my children are doing something productive and/or educational, I'm unlikely to interrupt them to do something else, especially something they're less enthusiastic about. I also try to encourage their interests in the direction I want them to go according to a classical/CM schedule. When DS asks for an audiobook, I'll generally choose something from Ambleside Online's suggestions for this year, and our bedtime reading is often connected with what we're doing in history. DS is a history buff largely because we're doing story-based, chronological history - I'm not sure he would have developed that love if left to his own devices. So we can do a lot of classical-style history that fits closely with his interests, if that makes sense. 


DS born 6/03, DD1 born 9/06, DD2 born 10/10, DD3 born 4/14.
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Old 09-19-2011, 02:03 PM
 
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We combine Waldorf & CM with a relaxed approach, while respecting where our children are "at". What we find most important is to keep a healthy rhythm in our home and lives. Our philosophy is "There's no rush".


Crunchy, treehugger.gifgranola, hippie.gifvegetarian, bi-lingual SAHM to two homeskooled boys.familybed2.gif
 

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Old 09-19-2011, 03:01 PM
 
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  Do what brings joy, nurtures curiosity, opens up the world to you and your kids.

 

 



This is one of the most beautiful sentences ever!!!  Thank you Sweet Silver!  I'm going to write this down and hang it up in my kitchen!!!  You are so right!

 

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Old 09-19-2011, 05:09 PM
 
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There are actually different 'levels' of unschooling... the folks that you might call "radical unschoolers" may well say "you either let your children be completely in charge or you don't",

 

If you get too persnickety about labels, though, then what do you call the kid who, 100% unschooled, says "I want to do a rigorous curriculum"?  

 

 

most of her time is completely self-directed creative play.  Like, you know, unschooling, in that respect.  :)  


I'm not particularly persnickety about labels, but I do think it's worth pointing out that you seem to be using the terms "unschooling" and "radical unschooling" in ways in which most unschoolers do not. "Radical unschooling" typically means applying the unschooling philosophy to non-academic areas of family life. It means children have autonomy over things like diet, bedtimes, toothbrushing, "chores," and such. It doesn't say anything about the degree to which academic education is child-led. 

 

As others have pointed out, if a curriculum is chosen and applied autonomously by the child it's unschooling. Except to non-unschoolers who have misconceptions, unschooling doesn't necessarily mean unstructured or acurricular. It can encompass structure and curriculum, and often does, if that's how the child wants things. 

 

Having unstructured playtime does not make one like an unschooler. Children can have copious unstructured playtime regardless of educational philosophy. Again you seem to be confusing unstructured with unschooled.

 

I think it is possible to be "unschooling-inspired and eclectic." But having a couple of subject areas that are child-led, or a bunch of unstructured playtime, does not mean one is "partly unschooling." To me that makes as much sense as being "partly atheist" because you don't always attend to the religious obligations of your faith. 

 

Miranda


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Old 09-20-2011, 09:48 PM
 
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stillheart.gif this thread. You had me at the title. 

 

This giant brain cloud is what I am on right now. This is just a few of my observations with *me* and *son*. I am a fairy type mom, craft, waldorfy, in love with these materials, stories, poems, etc. It is *me.* It is a beautiful influence if I share this in a way of sharing a joke I like at the dinner table. In an unschooling way, I want this like in my backpack. I do however, would love to spot a time of day this would have a huge chance of getting welcomed into their lives. What my son might want to write a play about or a book, might be really crazy super heroes (which he often uses non-toy items stuffed, poking out of pockets). I could get him to take this farther, I could try. If I were able to win the lottery, I would have rooms with purpose if I had more then 2 kids. In them I would have instruments, books, microscopes, telescopes, puzzles (Montessori) glass prisms, magnets, and some of the most amazingly illustrated books out there. I would (with son) probably dress up as historical or playful characters and learn something at the same time. Right now, we cook. Freddy made carrot snowmen after I juiced and tons of things happened when I made dough. They love to cook and measure. The love to paint too.. I would have a much better set, but I have spent a ton on the best brushes and noticed the best pictures come out with different postures for each kid. I am really trying to teach will, love, kindness, and respect right now. It takes so much time and I am not rushing these. (4 and 2, signature just will not change!) Classical feels like I gave them some real tools to me and I took the time to teach them to write. This could happen if the right book with child paired up and I would be happy if they wanted to do that. Really happy actually because DH would feel calm. I see doors that they would have an easier time with lots of practice early on, opening faster. I do feel like basic communication should be elegant and given to them like I want them to travel some and see museums.. I am truly waiting to see how it happens for each. It could very well happen with Spiderman and *I, Leslie* better be happy about that and proud at what made them so passionate! Love, eco, nutritious, clean, neat, active, humane to people and animals, gardening - these are big values in my home and I in a classical way, they happen around here with a lot of patience and love, but they happen. Some how a work book of my choice doesn't feel at *all* the same to me. I want a ton of resources, like doors, to be available to them as well. In a sort of child watching way ('she wants to do school' - very surprised if my son ever makes me say this) I am worried about unschooling, *****aim4balance**** wrote what I am wondering about with Freddy. It might be that unschooling actually could make him spin out of control and be unhappy, unstable, no floor....but getting him to comply is not my goal, but his happiness, growth, love I have for him to be felt! And it can be so odd to have a boy not want to do school, or anything really out of box, on schedule, because you are not sure that the reason is they are trying to find the ground and you are not giving it to them... and you have to carefully pick out which one. I pray to God it is going to be like the right healthy enzyme and fit perfectly!!!! My DH has all kinds of things to say about this but I am like a blockade... I am getting it together to journal him. Also get it together to schedule my time as close to a normal routine as I can do it and then softly getting them on board, with mostly open hours for right now (go outside, etc). 


Leslie, organic semi-unschooling mama teaching my children 5 and 2.75, that love & happiness is most important. Letting their light shine, finding out they are teaching me. Love being in the moment & nature.

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Old 09-20-2011, 10:17 PM
 
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Well, I think that so much of Waldorf is about the adult carrying the rhythm and the child naturally joining in, that you could Waldorfy unschool at least. In the early years. And classical is so much about enjoying good books that I could see some really in depth discussions happening totally un-coerced by the parent, so I think what you are describing could happen at least til around 8 and then you'd have to decide if you want to follow the W curric or just carry the family rhythm, enjoy Great Books, and forget about adhering to the "what is done" aspect of Waldorf like making a main lesson book, copying verses, etc.


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