Anyone have a really hard time deciding - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 14 Old 08-23-2011, 03:57 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I'm really struggling with our decision to homeschool (or not).  DD is supposed to start kindergarten this year and our plan all along had been to homeschool but now I'm not feeling good about either option.  Ideally, I'd like to send her to an alternative private school but we don't even have one here, let alone the cash to fund her tuition to such a place.  I'd love to hear about other people who had a hard time deciding to homeschool.  What made you finally make the decision one way or another?

 

Honestly, I think much of it is me being exhuasted and out of energy, but I'm just not sure how to get through deciding one way or the other.


Jenna ~ mommy to Sophia Elise idea.gif  (1/06), Oliver Matthew  blahblah.gif (7/07) and Avery Michael fly-by-nursing1.gif(3/10)

 

dizzy.gif Wading slowly and nervously into this homeschooling thing.

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#2 of 14 Old 08-23-2011, 09:17 PM
 
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I remember when I first took my now 13 y/o out of public school in the middle of 2nd grade. I didn't know anyone who homeschooled, and don't even know where I got the idea to do it.  But public school was not doing right by my ADHD child, and I knew I could do better, faster, and give him more time to run & play and be a child and use up all of that energy.

 

I prayed and felt that the Lord was leading me to teach my child.  Even so, I was ABSOLUTELY terrified!!!  After 1 day, I thought, that wasn't so bad.  After 1 week, I was confident that I had done the right thing in trusting in the Lord.  It felt so perfect.  Now, 3 kids later we've only debated sending my 13 y/o to public school so he can particpate in sports.  Arkansas is not very HS friendly, so HS kids are not welcome in their extra curricula activities.

 

Check out http://oldfashionededucation.com/fullcurriculum.htm for free curricula for pre-K thru 12th grade.

Check out http://flylady.com/ for tips on organizing your life so that you are not so exhausted.  There are special sections for homeschoolers and moms of toddlers.

Also try to find a local homeschool co-op/support group. Knowing you are not alone, can make all the difference. I searched the net for your area and found this link. http://binghamton.momslikeme.com/members/groupabout.aspx?g=543397  I hope this can help.

 

Whatever you decide, your children will be blessed because their mama cares about them. grouphug.gif

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#3 of 14 Old 08-24-2011, 04:24 AM
 
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Oh man, did/have we struggled with this, you are so not alone.  We had planned on it to for our first also, but his very outgoing, very adaptable self asked to go (and since DH is a teacher, our kids are exposed to school a lot, making it seem something enticing.)  I know of many other families who refuse to let their kids, esp at the age of 4 or 5, make a decision like that, or they present them with all the benefits of hs'ing compared to school to prove hs'ing is better.  We took the other route, of taking a leap of faith and trusting our child to show us by his experience in school which fit was best for him (as in, we monitored his behavior, his friendships, how much he was learning, was he becoming a different child now that he was going?, was it really the best fit for him?, etc).  Though our oldest still loves school, we still don't love a lot of what school had to offer, so this summer we bought curriculum, planned everything out, and homeschooled our boys (in only a few hrs a day, and not every day, for our rising 2nd grader and Kindergartener, while the 3 yr old played around us :)  We wanted to test the waters with the kids to see what the difference was.  It was terrible for my oldest.  He did not like it at all, the personality dynamic between he and I is not a good fit for teaching him even though at first he was so excited to try it out (they loved the content of the curriculum I bought).  I thought I was a terrible hs mom doing it wrong until I talked to a neighbor who WAS hs'ed as a child (and sends her 2 children to school) who also tried it herself, but said her experience with her oldest was the same as mine, and that she didn't feel right only hs'ing one so both are in school and overall they are all happier.  Anyway...my second child would do well hs'ed, but we found an awesome half day K program we are going to try out, since he too was asking when he was going to make friends.  Leading me to the one sticking point for me in all my experience knowing hs'ing families, and that I've read about here and on other forums, is that it is hit or miss whether you make friends, and even when you do its hard to see them every day or every week.  But even with that said, as unique as my middle child is, I could see needing to hs him in the future. So we decided we're taking it year by year.  Good luck with your decision!!!!!

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#4 of 14 Old 08-24-2011, 11:42 AM
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All my kids started at ps.  I pulled them out when it was no longer working for us.  Technically speaking, we live near one of "the best" public schools.  DD1 came home mid 3rd.  DD2 came home mid 1st.  DD3 is enrolled in half day kindy--we'll see how that goes.  To be honest, I am planning on only sending her for kindy.  My goal is for her to meet some kids that live close by.  Also, she gets jealous of the time needed for my middle child who is dyslexic.  So, I am hoping to do the one-on-one stuff while DD3 is at school.  But, if kindy proves to be a bad choice for us, I won't hesitate to pull her.  Also, our school has so many in each grade that she won't be with the same kids next year.  Only one or two of each gender will continue to first grade in the same classroom.  So, her "missing" her friends won't really be an issue.

 

I always planned to hs.  But life was crazy when dd1 was ready for K.  And we had such a great year that I actually started thinking I was crazy for thinking poorly about public school.  Now, I am more flexible in my thinking.  I know that there are some schools that I would never let my kids attend.  I also know that hs is great for us (right now).  If it changes, I will adjust as needed.

 

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#5 of 14 Old 08-24-2011, 12:35 PM
 
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Without knowing the details of your personal situation/exhaustion, take all this with a grain of salt of course.  :)  

 

My first thought is that any decision you make now doesn't have to be permanent.  If you decide to homeschool and it doesn't work out, then you can send them to school next year (or possibly even mid-year if you're really desperate).  And the reverse is also true... if you start public school kindergarten, and you're not happy, you can always pull them out.

 

There should ideally be a pro/con risk evaluation made for this decision.  Since either decision can be reversed, which is the most likely to cause the most amount of harm?  Is your personal exhaustion such that your child would be ignored, or even mistreated?  Then send them to school.  Or would the potential hazards of public kindergarten be the greater risk... many parents report a change in their child's personality, aggression, plus they're more exhausted and likely to misbehave once they're home after school.  This doesn't happen with all kids, of course, but it's one of the most common things you'll see mentioned when parents explain why they pulled their kids out in order to homeschool.  

 

If you're just not sure if you would do a 'good job' with a 'solid education' because of exhaustion -- but you're not actually concerned about mistreating your child -- then you should probably give it a try before disparaging yourself too much and counting yourself out before even starting the game!  To this end, it's helpful to really understand what kindergarten is, or what it should be.  Kindergarten was originally a *preparation* for school, it wasn't 'school' itself.  Kids would go to kindergarten to get used to the idea of proper behaviour in a group classroom setting: the social rules like raising your hand, waiting for the bell to go outside, sitting unless told to get up, accepting the teacher as the authority figure etc; as well as getting some exposure (not mastery, necessarily, just exposure) to basic literacy and math ideas.

 

Much of that doesn't apply to homeschooling anyway (nor does it apply to real life, so if they don't learn classroom social laws until they're older, there's no harm done!)... and basic literacy and mathematical *exposure* is dirt simple.  I often like to say, if you don't think you'd be able to pass on early-elementary-school-level skills to your child, then what does that say about your own education, and therefore why would you think your kids would be better off having the same kind of education that would leave them as adults not secure in elementary-level skills?

 

In fact, you're probably already doing a lot already, just in regular instinctive parenting.  Do you read with your child?  Sing songs with them?  Show them letters and answer when they ask what letters mean and how words are spelled?  Do you count toys as you take them out or put them away?  Do you make patterns with blocks or baubles?  Does she pretend to write letters and notes and maybe even actually write real words once in awhile?  Do you do crafts together?   Voila, you're doing kindergarten -- and probably in a much more natural, holistic, real-life way than a sit-down classroom way.

 

It can also be helpful to remember that in some countries, school doesn't officially start until age 7, what we would call grade 2.  And those countries have some of the highest literacy rates, and the children are happier because they had a chance to 'finish' their young childhood before starting more rigorous academics.  Personally, I've felt for a long time that even if someone doesn't plan to homeschool 'all the way', if it's at all possible, they should at least keep their kids home until they're 7.  Not in order to "do school" at home in the meantime.  But primarily in order to let them still be kids.  There's a HUGE difference in 'readiness' between age 5 and age 7!

 

If you'd be more comfortable following some kind of guidelines, just for the reassurance, then I'd suggest looking at something like Waldorf style homeschooling.  It's designed to not start "grade 1" until age 7, but there are lots of wonderful things to do for "kindergarten" in a Waldorf home.  Rather than traditional academics, Waldorf fits more holistically and I'd even say gently into a daily home routine... you find your own rhythm that works for your family.  It's based on handcrafts, practical skills, learning about nature, lots and lots of stories and songs and little rituals that kids love, and creative play.  There are sources like A Little Garden Flower and Earthschooling and Christopherus and even Oak Meadow (which is more traditionally academic, but with lots of Waldorf influence) that can help you find your path and structure, if that's what you need.  You might even find that the focus on 'rhythm' to the day, and peace, creativity, etc etc, might help you find your own peace and rejuvenation!

 

Anyway, that's just one suggestion to look into.  There are of course lots of options that might help you feel more confident.  You can always just do NOTHING.  Unschool.  Just not send your daughter to school and keep doing everything exactly the way you have been up until now.  She's probably pretty smart and mostly happy already, right?  So why fix it if it ain't broke.  Many families unschool for years, if not for the entire length of childhood, and it's amazing what kids will learn when left on their own.  This way you wouldn't have to worry about the potential damages from public school OR about your own possible insecurities about homeschooling... you'd just keep the status quo.  There's nothing inherently magical about age 5 where they should suddenly start "learning for real".  They've been learning all along, and academics are easily picked up when they're older. In fact, they're generally MORE easily picked up when they're older simply because of brain development, so kids who have "learned nothing" for a year or so and then start public school WILL catch up VERY quickly.  

 

Or if you decide that whatever it is that's giving you doubts is too much of an obstacle right now, and that you absolutely need your daughter out of the house for a part of the day (rather than merely keeping her home and not 'doing school'), then you can do that.  The risk of damages from a year of school is real -- but slight.  At least, of PERMANENT damage.  The worst case scenario is that she does a year of K, ends up with problems because of it, and then next year you decide to homeschool and have to spend some time deschooling and reconnecting first, in order to 'fix' the problems.  But they absolutely CAN be fixed.   So -- if you CAN keep her home, and would prefer to, but just aren't sure, then do keep her home and avoid those possible problems to begin with.  But if you CANNOT keep her home, rest assured that many, many parents who did not originally plan to homeschool have successfully pulled their kids and 'fixed' those problems, so you will be able to too, if you have to.  (Of course she might be perfectly happy in school too, I'm just spelling out the worst case scenario for some perspective).

 

Anyway, like I said, without knowing the specifics of your situation this might all just be dust in the wind rather than actual helpful advice... but hopefully at least part of it is helpful???  :)


Heather, mom to Caileigh 12/06 and aspie ADHD prodigy David 05/98 :intact lact
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#6 of 14 Old 08-24-2011, 08:22 PM - Thread Starter
 
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thank you for your replies... I guess I should give more information.  I have a masters in elementary education but never taught because I became disillusioned with the public schools.  My plan had been to send my children to an "alternative" private school but the one that was in this area closed several years ago.  My daughter is very bright (arguably gifted - both her father and I are) and is reading quite well.  For instance, she just finished reading "charlotte's web" and is now half way through "James and the Giant Peach".  She's a precocious reader whether or not she's technically "gifted".  This was without my "hothousing" or anything - she begged me to teach her to read.  My guess on why is because I sort of backed off reading to her much when her brother was born (they're 18 months apart) as i became very overwhelmed for a year or so and then got pregnant again... yeah, it's been a trip.  She's just a really motivated learner, in general - she reads all kinds of stuff and comes out with facts about things (like pygmy sharks) that I had never even heard of before.  So far I'd call what we'd been doing "unschooling" but she did go to a montessori school for about a year starting when she turned 3.  For reference, her brother is 4 and does not even recognize all his letters, and I've done the same with him - deal with his interests... he's just not interested in words and she was.

 

Anyway, re: my exhaustion.  I'm not worried for mistreatment of my children, just tired and want/need "me" time... or at least less chaos.  

 

Given all this and the fact that when I was observing/helping in our school district the 1st grade class didn't even come close to her reading level, I'm concerned about her being on the extreme end of bored in a classroom where the majority of the kids are covering letter sounds potentially for the first time.  They don't start any kind of TAG program until 3rd grade (and I understand it's because it often evens out by then).  We also have a decent sized homeschooling community in this area and friends that homeschool. And that's not even covering my other concerns surrounding public schools in general.  Honestly, it really does make LOGICAL sense for me to homeschool... I'm just having a hard time getting around emotional things, I guess.  I feel sort of forced into it, when I would really prefer to send her to a nice alternative private school (montessori or something along those lines with more learn-at-your-own-pace kinds of options).  Meh, I dunno.  Dh is really sold on homeschooling (I guess I really convinced him.  LOL) so he's not really supportive of my just sort of throwing up my hands and putting them in public school, though he would go along with it if I felt that convinced it was the way to go.  

 

For what it's worth, I've been struggling with this for a good year and a half... since we left the montessori school for certain reasons that I'd rather not get into, I guess.


Jenna ~ mommy to Sophia Elise idea.gif  (1/06), Oliver Matthew  blahblah.gif (7/07) and Avery Michael fly-by-nursing1.gif(3/10)

 

dizzy.gif Wading slowly and nervously into this homeschooling thing.

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#7 of 14 Old 08-25-2011, 03:39 AM
 
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If it makes you feel any better, in our experience with public school, they go bonkers over early readers, b/c reading and math are the tested subjects.  The early readers get pulled out of class to work together in the same way the slow readers do.  The ones in-between stay in class.  In my older son's class there actually were a number of kids who were reading at a 2nd grade level coming into K.  I talked to one of the moms about what she was doing, and she said she just picked out a reading comprehension workbook for him to do in lieu of the reading work that was sent home (b/c as she put it he can read really well, but he wasn't comprehending everything).  Whereas my son has always been quick at math so I bought him 1st grade workbooks to do in lieu of the K math work sent home (which overall being kindergarten wasn't a lot anyway).  He's going into 2nd grade now and the gap between the early readers and average readers like you are aware is far, far less noticeable.  DH is a public school high school teacher, and we are also very familiar with all the negatives of public school, and he was the biggest cheerleader for us giving hs'ing a try.  But to be honest I personally felt it was a lot of work on my plate, juggling everything, planning ahead to try and make things fun and interesting, plus constantly asking my 3 yr old to stop interrupting (though if we really do end up hs'ing at some point, I might find a little preschool for the young'ens so the time I had with my older kids would be spent more effectively.)  My second son started reading on his own by the time he was 5.  Not just a few sight words here and there, reading books, which shocked the pants of us b/c we had no idea he could read at all.  He can also write page after page very neatly (which to us is equally amazing since we know how our older son hated writing and had a hard time being patient enough to get even one sentence written down).  Since our older son has been in public school I personally believe his levels would be met well, but we're putting him in a small private school due to his personality--he's more of an introvert and doesn't exert himself in large groups, which IMO is necessary for not getting lost in the crowd of a large public school.  But because he's such a motivated and independent learner I can see us wanting to pull him back out if we feel the school setting starts to change that.

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#8 of 14 Old 08-25-2011, 06:48 AM
 
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Thanks for the additional info.  :)  It's great that you have such a supportive hubby!  If you need more 'me-time', would he be able to watch the kids when he's home (not necessarily 'schooling' with them, just spending time with them) so that you can go out and do some stuff?  Do you have hobbies, or things you'd LIKE to do if you had time?  Play in an adult band, join a quilting bee, go for coffee with friends, whatever floats your boat, or even solo stuff like write a blog, make scrapbooks, etc etc...

 

Chaos is something we all have to deal with, some of us more successfully than others.  I will say this -- having your kids go to school will NOT make things less chaotic!  It would, yes, give you more time on your own.  But it would introduce a whole other set of chaotic happenings.  I can't really offer any advice on taming your own chaos, there are lots of great resources on the web actually that provide help and ideas, it depends on your own particular situation and really must come from within as well.  

 

I can certainly understand the frustration of feeling like you were FORCED into homeschooling rather than coming to it 100% by choice.  Bear in mind, though, that any family that pulled their children out of school in desperation also feels that way, so you're not alone.  And the vast majority of them, once they've gotten settled into it and found their footing, so to speak, are so happy they did and no longer feel the same kind of resentment.  I don't think you should deny your feelings here - accept it, mourn the loss of the choice you wanted to make, allow yourself to process it and then move on from it, because it's not something you can change (unless you're willing to up and move somewhere else!!)  Many of us have gone through things in our life (not just homeschooling) that we were 'forced into' and angry about, but later on realized was the 'best thing that ever happened to me'!  

 

It sounds like you're struggling with some pessimism and insecurity, possibly not strictly about the homeschooling, but more generally as well?  I'm reminded of a great quote that's taken Canada by storm this week.  Jack Layton, the leader of the NDP party and leader of the official opposition (for the first time ever, after a stunning and unprecedented wave of rising popularity in our election this spring), died quite suddenly on Monday.  We all knew he was ill and fighting cancer, but he had already beaten prostate cancer last year and everyone expected that after some time off he'd be back to his old self.  He was respected by almost everybody, of all parties, because he always seemed to be kind, honest, fair, hard-nosed but with a sincere smile, etc. His death has really grabbed our country, it's quite stunning to see, really.

 

What does this have to do with anything?  Well, on Saturday, it seems that he knew what was coming and wrote a "letter to Canadians".  His last words, in effect, to be made public after his death.  There are general words to his party, to other people fighting cancer, and to Canadians in general.  The last paragraph has just taken the country by storm, it's re-tweeted and facebooked and written in chalk on sidewalks, it's got that 'timeless quote' feeling to it, and it really is words to live by.  Just thinking about them makes you feel more positive, and more ready to face challenges.  :)

 

"My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic. And we'll change the world."


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#9 of 14 Old 08-25-2011, 07:02 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by aim4balance View Post

But to be honest I personally felt it was a lot of work on my plate, juggling everything, planning ahead to try and make things fun and interesting, plus constantly asking my 3 yr old to stop interrupting 



Yes, this!  I feel like it's tripling my workload... even if we unschool, I have to seek playdates, set up music lessons and such, run them from place to place, all the while keeping my 17 month old busy and out of our hair.  Oh, right... and the regular chores need to be done, too...

 


Jenna ~ mommy to Sophia Elise idea.gif  (1/06), Oliver Matthew  blahblah.gif (7/07) and Avery Michael fly-by-nursing1.gif(3/10)

 

dizzy.gif Wading slowly and nervously into this homeschooling thing.

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#10 of 14 Old 08-27-2011, 03:35 PM
 
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I've done both, I have a brilliant minded child and one who is not the bright star in the night sky.  However, the brain gets pulled from class and works on reading for higher learners and the other one is doing just fine in her grade. 

 

When they were home, reading writing and math were our only subjects and I pretty much just let them be unless we were studying.  It's harder to homeschool time wise though because of the different levels of need and due to it being in your own home.  Letting them both go to kinder meant they met kids in the neighborhood and became friends.  This helped when I pulled them out.  There were few homeschooling families in my hood and the ones that homeschooled had hugely different views and it killed me and my kids to be around them. 

 

There are so many things to consider when you're making your decision I realize that but school isn't the worst thing and like DH tell our girls, you're going to school to socialize, you'll learn what you really need to know at home.  However they like to do well there.

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#11 of 14 Old 08-28-2011, 07:51 AM
 
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I'm having a really hard time deciding, too. Ds is four, going to preschool six hours a week this year, and I'm planning to test out the homeschooling waters the days he's home. If we work well together I may homeschool him for kindergarten and see how that goes. One day at a time, I guess. I'm worried about losing my alone time more than anything else. The decision gives me a stomach ache, though, so I know how you feel. Hugs to you.

 

 


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#12 of 14 Old 09-05-2011, 05:46 AM
 
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#13 of 14 Old 09-24-2011, 10:05 PM
 
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Hey... Hugsssss!!!!! This is sooooo not really, but sooo much how I feel. It is hard because husband is, well not a total nut case, but like... one way one minute with a whole wondering lust lists of "we should" or "you think public school is all" and then totally "let's go to France!" "Let's go see 'x'! And it is first him that is really stressing on me. I can't even talk to him about it. It seems as though he forgets everything he said because his emotions have changed. And as soon as I do start thinking of throwing in the towel, I vocalize the day for us, starting with morning.. and it seems like he thinks "no, no, no" right after that. It seems like too sometimes he wants time to do things and the guilt of Fred not doing studious work is hard on him too. 

 

I wish so much that I could be that perfect family for you and we could trade hours, be neighbors and get it all done, not together, but just breaking like this. My visions and reasons for homeschooling go so much deeper than anything public school could ever offer. It is really some serious achievements and I know public school does have some pros and cons, I really can't see the pros for homeschooling coming close to them. Like you said about a private school, but not even.. my biggest pros are real rich life moments and learning with enough freedom for a rolling sense of passion to coming rumbling out of your soul and being on fire, without any period bells involved, and love, lots of love, giving love experiences as a life skill kind of thing. I understand you need all these skills to get a really huge ivy door open for some kids, but if my kid wanted that homeschooling would be faster because their powerful studious self would rise so quickly to let me see that. Teaching them love, the power of their own will and open their own doors to exploration is really the life long lesson I deeply want them to have and be great at! 

 

And then, to public school one of those kids that really wants to be in that context is also a very loving choice! Maybe you would call it selfish, but I would be so bummed that I had to be a wonder mom over there and be on a tight budget with that schedule. It would become weekends family time, homework at dinner/family/game time, and far less traveling during the cheaper months to see the US. 

 

I do totally feel as I am trying to hard to gear up that I will not be great to both of them. And often hear DH say the same thing. 

 

I am also freaked that our cute little woodsy *affordable* rental would not be a great home for Montessori.... Is that one of the ways you were thinking about HSing? I came from that preschool and I totally get what you are saying. I am not ready to say sharing a classroom with people that aren't friends is a good thing though. I am not one to put young children in a stressful place to help them grow until much older and more founded. I am wondering if you can be okay with working a tiny bit on this each week, and plan out the balance over a month like a pie chart. When you find a solid point of vision, I wonder if trying to find a hsing friend interested in Montessori is the one of the key to a) learning toys b) learning friend that pushes their thinking. I have seen a peak at the Montessori feeling and I am not sure at all about it! See... I am pretty raw and naked when it comes to dream+love+life and my DH, which made a lot of money with his education thinks I am so wrong about this and the "factory feeling" that I get with all this school stuff is actually a gift! But... says with whimper, rock stars make a lot of money and they seem fun.. You know it is more than that. The "do it because it is good for you" is safe with me! I get it! I just actually worry way more if life is so much easier to be happy when you see the rougher side of the foundation, like a 3rd world country I guess, you get a lot of love and happiness (family right? I mean a little hard to work it into school so much, but I know it happens) and then you are given the go to read on anything with fire and passion, because, once you get to college, it really comes down to that thick text book, and if the text book is not so important then the experiences they make sure you have are.. some person talking and answering your question/mentor is really important when you have come so far. I very much support college! I just think life is so full, rich, and powerful it is so much easier to teach them to train on their own. 

 

Wait.. you pay NY taxes! Wow.. uhmm... well NY and NH are the two biggest states we were considering to school our kids. Not joking. hmmmm... not that anything I said just changed but it is a lot harder for you. The snow is another thing for getting out and about. The tax payment just makes it so much harder to keep them home! 

 

On self, chores, yoga, being all that you can be, ready for them, making costumes while they are away, etc.. Hugs! That is sooooo me. My public school friend seems almost giddy (she wants to return to work where she makes tons and feels so much passion)...anyway I was going on about all the homestead work to be done before 2:30 pm. It is a huge long list. I so feel like I could have so much beauty into my life if it were like that. That is like 35 hours a week, my life would look like a magazine. Everyone would feel like we were in a movie. I have thought about it and drooled. I hate to tell you this but I *need* that too. I do, me... I am super important too. My kids should also learn that in reality, they need that too. That the fairytale castle, etc, takes time, love and effort. It actually doesn't feel so hard. I means I need 4 hours a day to make a home. 2 more in the morning and at night too. I am not afraid to take them with me. I so need alone time though. 

 

And after saying all of this. It comes really easy for me to answer a deep burning question in me! How scheduled should life be? And I now know it should be as much as possible, even writing down "off day."


Leslie, organic semi-unschooling mama teaching my children 5 and 2.75, that love & happiness is most important. Letting their light shine, finding out they are teaching me. Love being in the moment & nature.

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Okay, well compared to a freezer dinner fast food and not family centered family lifestyle. I find it rather fun if they decided to rv or small home live because they grew up with helping out. They both love to do the fun stuff and I just find it, in the long run, harder on their life long dreams to be out of the chore part or even doing it for pay and not because they live here. I have been close to people that had a maid/ or mom maid childhood and they seem to feel more imprisioned by this... Hard to explain... I just wanted to cover the 4 hours... Cooking, dressing, bed making, sweeping... Montessori but not all of it. I like the results... They act empowered and seem to be grateful.. Still so young. Athena has no issue and seems to be loving it!!!! Fred has made a huge stride and decided to pack his trains away to have more room for airplanes and to "make less clean up mess mom" :D I am so not a strict mom! I just need balance and I want them to learn how that alll works too! Parents that have a family farm have a lot more to do and I love that too! I think the taking care of your world too is really for sanity!!! Especially in homeschooling!! Just wanted to share this because it points at a lot of the baby in arms struggles. And homeschooling is so much stuff in home too...


Leslie, organic semi-unschooling mama teaching my children 5 and 2.75, that love & happiness is most important. Letting their light shine, finding out they are teaching me. Love being in the moment & nature.

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