Where to post when "building schooled" kids are also educated at home and parents are looking for support? - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 51 Old 10-28-2012, 06:50 AM - Thread Starter
 
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My child is educated in part at a small charter school. In part because of the small school's limited resources, we are often educating our DC at home as well. I often find myself needing some extra support (especially as we enter the world of diagraphs and complicated phonic blends!). I'd love to hear the thoughts from the LAH community on whether posting in this forum is appropriate in this situation or if you feel like in general you'd prefer to keep this as a special place for LAH families. Thanks!  


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#2 of 51 Old 10-28-2012, 07:10 AM
 
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As long as the poster is up front about the arrangement, I don't have a problem. Some familes I know have a child or two at home, the rest at school, or visa versa. Where else can you get help for the home part? Have you talked with the folks running the school about what you feel needs supplementing at home?
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#3 of 51 Old 10-28-2012, 07:18 AM - Thread Starter
 
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As long as the poster is up front about the arrangement, I don't have a problem. Some familes I know have a child or two at home, the rest at school, or visa versa. Where else can you get help for the home part? Have you talked with the folks running the school about what you feel needs supplementing at home?

Yes - we have on going supplementation at home. Most recently we have been asked to provide some phonics education out of school (either at home or with a tutor). I'd like to get some support for this specific phonics method and I find I have a lot of questions. I figure I can either ask here - I imagine lots of parents know the answers to my questions. Alternatively, I could post in LAS and link to here. Either is fine with me but I do agree that I may get more support in this forum. I wanted to ask the community first, though, before I barged in. shy.gif

 

I'll wait to hear from a few more members and if it seems cool with most folks, I'll post a big old explanation of what we're trying to teach DC. 

 

But, for example: 

 

When teaching the 'ou' diagraphs in words like "through" do you teach that the "gh" is silent or do you teach the "ough" as the letter blend/entire sound? 


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#4 of 51 Old 10-28-2012, 07:28 AM
 
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I never taught my son phonics. He's a sight reader, just like me. Sorry, I don't have any help for you. It probably would be good to post in both places to get the most advice. I think there should be a learning forum where parents can get feedback from those who learn at school and those who learn at home at the same time. Good luck with phonics!
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#5 of 51 Old 10-28-2012, 08:17 AM
 
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I think one thing to consider is whether other people would benefit from the responses to such a post. I know I sure would. Anything that supports an understanding of digraphs and trigraphs and quadruplegraphs sounds good to me.

 

Anyway I would teach "ough" as an entire sound rather than teach "gh" as being silent. And "ough" can almost be considered a sight word by itself, so if you are doing words via flashcards or whatever I would add a sight word card for "ough."

 

But. Having said that. I've found that it isn't useful to teach these more complex sounds, beyond the basic blends, as a separate thing, really, and instead let them come up as she naturally encounters them in her reading. When DD and I were doing online K12 they had us targeting digraphs and trigraphs in anticipation of her needing to know them in order to advance her reading to more difficult books, and that was backwards for us. It was far better to have DD read what she wanted and should we come across a nasty sentence like "She coughed as the dough ploughed through the rough trough" we'd talk about how crazy English is, and should we learn German instead?  

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#6 of 51 Old 10-28-2012, 08:21 AM
 
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I agree that as long as you are up front with the arrangement, posting here should help you along.  

 

But warning:  just like the answer above ("he's a sight reader") you are likely to find a lot of responses that might not apply well to your situation.  Many of us here are child-led at least to some degree, and it is easy for us to switch gears if something isn't working or isn't enjoyable.   You are just as likely to hear answers like this:

 

"As far as sounds, we talk about them as they come up in our stories.  The "ou" and "ough" are tough because you have words like trough and bough and enough as well as through.  So, we approach them one at a time as they arise.  To me it seems a tad silly to try to find a rule that only covers a couple of words."

 

Which might not be helpful to you in your situation if they want more formal coverage of the topic.  

 

Anyhow, ask away, I think.  


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#7 of 51 Old 10-28-2012, 08:58 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Well, judging from the last two responses I think posting here will be GREAT for us! We have been advised by many teachers that DC will benefit from explicit instruction with regards to reading and spelling. I agree 100%. Before DC showed signs of a reading delay I was a big fan of letting kids learn to read when they are ready. I fully expected my DC to learn easily when all the developmental pieces came together for her. That was not the case. She did not learn to read until she was given a fairly explicit instruction on the structure of works and sounds. I did Reading Reflex with her (stopped when the instruction became confusing for me) and she had some tutoring in some sort of phonics based program. We also did a wonderful system called "Quick Reads" for her fluency issues. 

 

Long story short, I want to do some explicit digraph instruction but really need some support on how to do that. I've been doing a bit of reading but feel like posting here with specific questions and getting wonderful responses like the ones I've already gotten will really help move us along. 

 

 

This, for example is a great point and something I need to hear: 

 

 


Originally Posted by SweetSilver View Post

 

To me it seems a tad silly to try to find a rule that only covers a couple of words.

 

 

I agree with you but I feel like DC may be comforted by these "rules" even if it means she needs to learn a whole bunch of rules - instead of just learning how to spell words by memory. I *think* she will end up relying on memory rather than rules (as it seems most of us do?) but I think she will do better practicing memorizing through the structure of learning the rules of language. If that makes any sense. 

 

For the record, DC's school and their accomplished reading specialist have suggested that DC may learn to read in a slightly "unusual" way. They have suggested synthetic phonics for her, which is the system I will be asking about when I make my post here asking for help. 

 

 


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Originally Posted by BellinghamCrunchie View Post
When DD and I were doing online K12 they had us targeting digraphs and trigraphs in anticipation of her needing to know them in order to advance her reading to more difficult books, and that was backwards for us.

 

I have a fairly strong feeling that the opposite is true for my DC. She was VERY slow learning even the most basic sight words. She struggled with fluency until she was 9 because even words like "they", "come", and etc. That issue is resolved now (thanks to Quick Reads) but I think it's a good illustration of how her mind things about written language. 


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#8 of 51 Old 10-28-2012, 09:05 AM
 
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It seems appropriate to me for you to post in LAH if you have questions about teaching your child yourself.  I can't imagine why anyone would object.  And I don't think it's important for you to be "up front" about the fact that your kid is in school, either.  As far as I'm concerned, if you have questions about teaching reading, you can just go ahead and ask them without having to give a lot of background about your child's particular schooling situation.

 

I don't think it actually matters that much how you teach "ough" words.  I'd probably be inclined to teach that the "gh" is silent.  You probably aren't teaching "ouch" or "outh" as single units, so why teach "ough" as one?  On the other hand, "ough" is sort of a special case, so it doesn't really seem wrong to me to teach it as a unit. 

 

With my kids, I found, like BellinghamCrunchie, that it wasn't necessary to teach complex sounds in a planned-out way before the kids encountered them. But if your kid has run into "ough" words a lot and seems to be having a hard time with them, I guess it could make sense to focus on them explicitly.  And if I were doing that, I think I would probably (in contradiction to my earlier opinion), make lists of words where the "ough" sounds like "uff," "off," "oo," and "ow" and just talk about "ough" as a whole unit.

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#9 of 51 Old 10-28-2012, 09:13 AM
 
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Yes, I think you just have to explain your situation when you post here. Otherwise, someone like me will come and advise "just wait a year or two." Which doesn't really help you if you are helping a child keeping up with a class:-)

 

My son has always been highly resistant to any mention of phonics. He's a sight reader and I just tell him what a word says if he asks. And I read to him regularly. Sometimes he is following along, looking at the text, as I read which likely reinforces his reading skills. But much of the time he isn't.

 

I'm under the impression for words like though, through, rough, etc that many schools switch to treating them as sight words and just ask kids to memorize them. 


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#10 of 51 Old 10-28-2012, 09:29 AM
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Originally Posted by IdentityCrisisMama View Post

 

When teaching the 'ou' diagraphs in words like "through" do you teach that the "gh" is silent or do you teach the "ough" as the letter blend/entire sound? 

First, I think it is fine that you post here.

 

Second, I ended up teaching "ough" as it's own thing.  We relied on All about spelling a lot and they have a tile for ou and a tile for ough so that is why I did it that way.  Each tile (in that program) represents one sound.  So, anything that might be referred to as silent, is on a tile somewhere with the letters that seem responsible for the sound.  Except E, you do use an e for the silent e--there is a book about the 6 different reasons for silent e. 

 

Although, when looking at phonics from a reading perspective or from a spelling perspective, sometimes it makes more sense from a particular pov.  I sometimes adjust wording when we are in the middle of reading to make it work for my child from that angle.

 

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#11 of 51 Old 10-28-2012, 09:41 AM
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I don't think it actually matters that much how you teach "ough" words.  I'd probably be inclined to teach that the "gh" is silent.  You probably aren't teaching "ouch" or "outh" as single units, so why teach "ough" as one?  On the other hand, "ough" is sort of a special case, so it doesn't really seem wrong to me to teach it as a unit. 

 

With my kids, I found, like BellinghamCrunchie, that it wasn't necessary to teach complex sounds in a planned-out way before the kids encountered them. But if your kid has run into "ough" words a lot and seems to be having a hard time with them, I guess it could make sense to focus on them explicitly.  And if I were doing that, I think I would probably (in contradiction to my earlier opinion), make lists of words where the "ough" sounds like "uff," "off," "oo," and "ow" and just talk about "ough" as a whole unit.

 

No, you wouldn't teach "ouch" or "outh" as single units because you have two separate sounds in each of those examples!

 

Your suggestion to make lists of words that cover the variety of the "ough" sounds is actually used in several reading programs.  Abecedarian (http://www.abcdrp.com/details.asp) is one of these programs.  It first goes through by sound--you sort words by how the "ow" sound is made (and other sounds).  Then you sort by the letter combo.  Many kids find great success with this.

 

Actually, Abecedarian is considered a phono-graphix method which is what Reading Reflex is.  However, the more advanced stuff (that gets hard to implement in reading reflex) is easy to implement in Abecedarian.

 

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#12 of 51 Old 10-28-2012, 09:44 AM - Thread Starter
 
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No, you wouldn't teach "ouch" or "outh" as single units because you have two separate sounds in each of those examples!

 

Your suggestion to make lists of words that cover the variety of the "ough" sounds is actually used in several reading programs.  Abecedarian (http://www.abcdrp.com/details.asp) is one of these programs.  It first goes through by sound--you sort words by how the "ow" sound is made (and other sounds).  Then you sort by the letter combo.  Many kids find great success with this.

 

Actually, Abecedarian is considered a phono-graphix method which is what Reading Reflex is.  However, the more advanced stuff (that gets hard to implement in reading reflex) is easy to implement in Abecedarian.

 

Amy

Ooooh...this is very intriguing for me!  Sounds like a really good fit for DC. Off to check it out. jog.gif  

 

And THANK YOU everyone for being so welcoming and already more helpful than other avenues I've tried so far. I wish I had posted here earlier in our journey. 


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#13 of 51 Old 10-28-2012, 09:46 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Ooooh...this is very intriguing for me!  Sounds like a really good fit for DC. Off to check it out. jog.gif   

 

Oh, no!! Is this program too good to be true?!?  Is it also super affordable? Is my long lost search over? Please? 


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#14 of 51 Old 10-28-2012, 09:51 AM
 
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No, you wouldn't teach "ouch" or "outh" as single units because you have two separate sounds in each of those examples!

 

But sometimes "ough" contains two separate sounds. Sometimes the "gh" is silent and sometimes it sounds like "f."  But even though treating the "ou" and the "gh" as separate units makes sense to me, I still don't think it matters all that much which way people do it.

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#15 of 51 Old 10-28-2012, 12:35 PM
 
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What would the rule be for "ough"?  Off the top of my head, I am coming up with a range of words that end in "ough" with different sounds.  Although, through, bough, rough...

 

I've always felt like the "rule" model falls apart at some point and it's easier to memorize individual words than a complicated rule that includes all the special cases.  

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#16 of 51 Old 10-28-2012, 12:40 PM - Thread Starter
 
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What would the rule be for "ough"?  Off the top of my head, I am coming up with a range of words that end in "ough" with different sounds.  Although, through, bough, rough...

 

I've always felt like the "rule" model falls apart at some point and it's easier to memorize individual words than a complicated rule that includes all the special cases.  

Yes - it probably is the case for some sounds, ha? I think if I can structure most of the "advanced" spelling with rules my DC will be able to tolerate a few sounds that are just learned through memory/sight words. I want to limit those as much as possible though because of the difficulties she had with sight words as an early reader.  


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#17 of 51 Old 10-28-2012, 01:36 PM
 
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What would the rule be for "ough"?  Off the top of my head, I am coming up with a range of words that end in "ough" with different sounds.  Although, through, bough, rough...

 

I've always felt like the "rule" model falls apart at some point and it's easier to memorize individual words than a complicated rule that includes all the special cases.  

Yes - it probably is the case for some sounds, ha? I think if I can structure most of the "advanced" spelling with rules my DC will be able to tolerate a few sounds that are just learned through memory/sight words. I want to limit those as much as possible though because of the difficulties she had with sight words as an early reader.  

Is it possible that her struggles as an early reader had to do with a lack of readiness?  My later reader had a terrible time with sight words (even words she'd JUST figured out) until something flipped in her brain and she didn't have trouble anymore.  She reads above grade level now.  Her spelling is still catching up, but my experience with my other kids and what I've been told by other homeschoolers is that spelling often lags reading by a couple years.  

 

I know you may not be in a situation where you can just sit back and give her another year, so I mention this primarily in case it sounds like your situation and might help you stress a little less.

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#18 of 51 Old 10-28-2012, 01:50 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Is it possible that her struggles as an early reader had to do with a lack of readiness?  My later reader had a terrible time with sight words (even words she'd JUST figured out) until something flipped in her brain and she didn't have trouble anymore.  She reads above grade level now.  Her spelling is still catching up, but my experience with my other kids and what I've been told by other homeschoolers is that spelling often lags reading by a couple years.  

 

I know you may not be in a situation where you can just sit back and give her another year, so I mention this primarily in case it sounds like your situation and might help you stress a little less.

 

It's very much true that we can't wait another year for her to be ready because she attends school and is starting middle next year, however I don't feel like that's the whole of it for my DC. I very much trusted the concept of readiness until I watched my daughter learn to read. I believe she has some minor dyslexia or something along those lines. But, honestly, either way I think my DC really wants to learn to spell. She's lagging behind her peers and is aware of it. Her peers are quite sweet so it's not an issue of peer pressure so much as I think my DC would rather not stand out in this way, yk? Also DC's overcoming of her reading delay has been a growth experience for her that I think is to her credit in the long run. So, even if we were able to take a "wait till she's ready" approach, I'm not sure if that would be the best choice for DC - regardless of where she was getting her education. 


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#19 of 51 Old 10-28-2012, 04:23 PM
 
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It's very much true that we can't wait another year for her to be ready because she attends school and is starting middle next year, however I don't feel like that's the whole of it for my DC. I very much trusted the concept of readiness until I watched my daughter learn to read. I believe she has some minor dyslexia or something along those lines. But, honestly, either way I think my DC really wants to learn to spell. She's lagging behind her peers and is aware of it. Her peers are quite sweet so it's not an issue of peer pressure so much as I think my DC would rather not stand out in this way, yk? Also DC's overcoming of her reading delay has been a growth experience for her that I think is to her credit in the long run. So, even if we were able to take a "wait till she's ready" approach, I'm not sure if that would be the best choice for DC - regardless of where she was getting her education. 

 

It sounds like she would like to be at age-level in reading, and that she is having some delays that aren't related to readiness, and that she needs additional support to stay up with her peers. So you are mainly asking what kind of curriculum and approach would work best to teach the skills that she needs, and that the approach and curriculum needs to mesh well with the charter/public school (will she be attending public middle school or the charter school next year?). Does this sound right?

 

I have found this site to be extremely useful for working with phonics and reading with my DD. http://www.fcrr.org/curriculum/studentCenterActivities45.shtm. Its the Florida Center for Reading Research and if you scroll down to the bottom half of the page, there are several PDF files in various subjects that you can select to download (advanced phonics, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension). This link is for grades 4-5 but if its too difficult for her you can find the 2-3 grades and try that. I haven't looked at the material for grades 4-5 but we use the material from the 2-3 grade pdfs and its awesome. The activities are broken down into short games, targeting a specific phoneme or group at a time, and are pretty engaging. There is a bit of prep (cutting the printed pages to make the game pieces, etc) but its not too bad. I usually get the cutting and gluing done on Sunday evening for the next week. Be aware the files are pretty big. 

 

Another site we use for reading is Reading Eggs. You have to pay for a subscription, but its not too expensive and DD finds it fun. I believe its based in Australia so it doesn't follow state core standards for the US but its fun, and DD will spend a lot of time on it all by herself (she is 7). I believe you can take a placement test so that your DD will be starting at the level that is appropriate for her, but I'm not certain. http://readingeggs.com/

 

Is the charter school full or part-time? If you can get away with calling it part-time, http://www.k12.com/ K12 sounds like it might be a good match for your family. You would have to do it part-time, but that is okay because that way you can target language arts, spelling, etc and not worry about math and science and the other subjects. In addition, its free, and they send you a TON of materials (all the workbooks, texts, etc that you need). K12 is a mixture of online activities and desk work, and the variety might help keep her interest. It also follows the core standards for your state, so she would be getting the exact same stuff that the public school kids are learning and reading many of the same books.

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#20 of 51 Old 10-28-2012, 05:06 PM - Thread Starter
 
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It sounds like she would like to be at age-level in reading, and that she is having some delays that aren't related to readiness, and that she needs additional support to stay up with her peers. So you are mainly asking what kind of curriculum and approach would work best to teach the skills that she needs, and that the approach and curriculum needs to mesh well with the charter/public school (will she be attending public middle school or the charter school next year?). Does this sound right?

 

Yes, other than I think I will do a post that asks for a specific curriculum style - "synthetic phonics". The best description I've found so far for synthetic phonics is this: 

 

http://www.syntheticphonics.com/synthetic_phonics.htm

 

(edited because the above link is a great description!) 

 

I checked out your other links. I think K12 does not have a tuition free option in my state but the FL site you linked seems a great resource. Though, DC doesn't seem to "need" games - yet (or maybe at all). It's more like she has a block and needs to be explained it until I (we) find a way to help her figure it out. Know what I mean? 

 

I signed up for the egg site. Is that mainly reading? It looks promising because I like the idea of her doing some stuff in her free time but she needs to work on spelling more than reading at this point. 

 

I hope I don't sound like I'm nixing a lot of suggestions. redface.gif

 

This quote from the Orton Gillingham Wikipedia page sums up how I feel about my DC: 

 
 Language elements that non-dyslexic learners acquire easily must be taught directly and systematically.

 

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#21 of 51 Old 10-28-2012, 05:21 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I have found this site to be extremely useful for working with phonics and reading with my DD. http://www.fcrr.org/curriculum/studentCenterActivities45.shtm

So I said I didn't think we would use the games but I am digging through this site and I like the material. I printed page 17-19 of the teacher guide, which is basically a chart with all the sounds different letters can make. I actually think my DC will learn well by reading the teacher manual. Which makes me want to ask -- what kind of learner is that?  

 

I also really like their little table tent vowel chart for kids - need to count the page number and print that for her. 

 

Thank you for all the resource suggestions! 


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#22 of 51 Old 10-28-2012, 09:39 PM
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Originally Posted by onatightrope View Post

What would the rule be for "ough"?  Off the top of my head, I am coming up with a range of words that end in "ough" with different sounds.  Although, through, bough, rough...

 

I've always felt like the "rule" model falls apart at some point and it's easier to memorize individual words than a complicated rule that includes all the special cases.  

I agree that the "rule" model eventually falls apart.  I mentioned earlier that we used AAS.  I think it makes a great foundation, but felt that levels five and six were really just demonstrating different patterns rather than teaching anymore rules.  It was more, this sound could be made by this or it could be made by this, but we can't really tell you when to use either.  There might have been certain circumstances that lead to one way or the other but it was not cut and dry.  For that matter, "ough" is a horrible collection of letters--I think we would do better without it. 

 

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#23 of 51 Old 10-28-2012, 09:47 PM
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You also mentioned that she may be a bit dyslexic.  I must recommend the yahoo group for dyslexic support.  Some homeschool, some use public, private, etc.  There is a great post saved in the files section explaining the difference between orton-gillingham and phono-graphix methods.  

 

http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/dyslexiasupport2/

 

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Originally Posted by AAK View Post

It was more, this sound could be made by this or it could be made by this, but we can't really tell you when to use either.  There might have been certain circumstances that lead to one way or the other but it was not cut and dry.

This would be fine for DC. We already do that (though I really need to learn to be able to recognize sounds and explain things better). I  think the way it's going to work for DC with spelling is a combination of knowing the rules (though considering how many exceptions there are, perhaps "rules" isn't the best word?), relying on memory to a small extent, visualizing, tapping out the sounds, "does it look right?", & trying different letters/rules until it does. 

 

So you don't use the link above for spelling - you use AAS? Perhaps I'll look into that again. 

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Originally Posted by AAK View Post

You also mentioned that she may be a bit dyslexic.  I must recommend the yahoo group for dyslexic support.  Some homeschool, some use public, private, etc.  There is a great post saved in the files section explaining the difference between orton-gillingham and phono-graphix methods.  

 

http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/dyslexiasupport2/

 

Amy

I am a member of that group, from a few years ago. I didn't keep up with it but will log back in and check the files. I am very interested in the methods and just learning what they are and how they are different for now. 

 

Thanks, again, everyone! This has been a big help. 


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#25 of 51 Old 10-29-2012, 07:55 AM
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So you don't use the link above for spelling - you use AAS? Perhaps I'll look into that again. 

I am a member of that group, from a few years ago. I didn't keep up with it but will log back in and check the files. I am very interested in the methods and just learning what they are and how they are different for now. 

 

My dd is dyslexic and a bit dysgraphic.  When we were trying to use ABeCeDarian, she struggled with how much writing there was.  The program has the child write the words into the appropriate groups.  Most people probably wouldn't think there is a ton of writing, but to my dd, there was.  So, I took the sorting part and turned that into my easter egg games.  (She hunts the eggs and then sorts the words that she finds by taping them into groups on the window.)  Then she sort of hit a wall and wasn't progressing.  This would have been 2nd grade.  I had also purchased the "I See Sam" readers and All About Spelling (AAS) level one.  I can't remember the order of that.  ABeCeDarian doesn't claim to be a spelling program.  I thought that would be good because the OG programs like Barton require the child to master the spelling and reading of a level before they more on.  I didn't want that requirement.  I wanted her reading and spelling to not be dependent on each other.  AAS is OG based, but at the time was just focused on spelling.  This program REALLY helped her spelling.  Using the tiles, seeing the sound choices in front of her, and methodically learning general rules was great.  We knew that there would be exceptions, but the first three levels have few exceptions.  Learning the 6 ways we divide syllables was really good for her.  It actually was the catalyst to her reading longer words.  I do like learning syllables this way better than the way ABeCeDarian does the longer words.  In third grade I dropped ABeCeDarian and just used AAS, the I See Sam readers, and Explode the Code Workbooks (we didn't do Explode the Code in order, but we used them as a review of what she had done in AAS).  We also got the Beyond the Code books and did them orally. I was adapting AAS to work for reading as well.  Then, I thought I must be missing something so I borrowed Barton from a friend.  Wow, did we hate that program!  I know that many people love it, but we didn't.  It seemed anal, inflexible, slow, and demeaning.  

 

For whatever reason, she sort of hit a spelling wall during level three.  I don't know if we will be back to AAS or not.  Either way, I love the foundation that it gave her.  She now uses sequential spelling on dvd and is doing well with it.  I can't imagine that she would have any success with it if it weren't for the background she got from AAS.  Also, at the end of 3rd I pulled out the ABeCeDarian books again and she did much better with them.  We broke words into chunks using the syllable rules we learned in AAS, but that is all I changed.  Now, we use REWARDS to help her with multisyllable words.  I really like it, she isn't such a fan.  

 

The people who created AAS also have a reading program now as well.  I haven't used it.  When it came out with level one, we were already beyond the scope.  Level 2 is out now and I think we are beyond that level as well.

 

I am very unconventional in my approach.  I suppose that many people would say that I shouldn't jump around so much in programs.  However, I try very hard to read my dd.  If it is getting TOO frustrating, she won't learn from it so we try something else.  We have our own little pattern developed and it seems to be working.  She is in fourth grade now and reading at a 3rd grade level.  I hope that we can narrow the gap, but at the same time it won't be the end of the world if we don't.  Right now, she is the only dyslexic I know that still LOVES to read.  By adapting our teaching to fit her needs, I hope to preserve that love.  I figure that she will have a greater chance of improving this way.  People who love to read, read.  And by reading more, it should get easier for her.  

 

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#26 of 51 Old 10-29-2012, 08:05 AM
 
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Maybe some things are best memorized.

Ough

O as I'm though, dough

Off as in cough

Oo as in through

To me there's not much in the way of rules for this one.
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#27 of 51 Old 10-29-2012, 08:30 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Quote:

Originally Posted by AAK View Post

 

Quote:


When we were trying to use ABeCeDarian, she struggled with how much writing there was.  

 

I think DC could get along with the writing part. She seems to like to write (the physical part). We haven't really been dedicated to this but DC loves spelling tests. It's so weird to me that I don't do them often with her. winky.gif

 

Quote:
I wanted her reading and spelling to not be dependent on each other.

I can relate to that, especially now. 

 

     Quote:

AAS is OG based, but at the time was just focused on spelling.  This program REALLY helped her spelling.

I'll look into it again. On first glance it seems like a lot of material to keep track of and dig out, which will be a hardship for us. The BEST program for us would be one that can be done on the go in short time segments. Perhaps that's asking too much. 

 

Quote:
Learning the 6 ways we divide syllables was really good for her.

Sounds very interesting - I think DC would really benefit from this knowledge when we complete the vowel diagraps. 

 

 

Quote:
Now, we use REWARDS to help her with multisyllable words.  I really like it, she isn't such a fan.

I'm pretty sure I have a REWARDS student book around here somewhere. What we had wasn't a great fit, as I recall but maybe it was because I was too cheap to get the teacher manual? 

 

 

 

Quote:
Right now, she is the only dyslexic I know that still LOVES to read.  By adapting our teaching to fit her needs, I hope to preserve that love.  I figure that she will have a greater chance of improving this way.  People who love to read, read.  And by reading more, it should get easier for her.  

I realize this thread is about me and my DC AND my DC has never been diagnosed with any specific LD (we haven't had her tested) but she also had a delay in 2nd and I'm noticing some similarities. If your DC struggles at all with fluency, I really loved "Quick Reads" fluency program and so did my DC. I attribute it to her getting over one her her lags as well as to her enjoying to read. You can sometimes find a used copy on Ebay for just a few bucks. 

 


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#28 of 51 Old 10-29-2012, 08:47 AM
 
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Originally Posted by pek64 View Post


To me there's not much in the way of rules for this one.

No, but you could list word groups for the various sounds, and for some kids that would be enough to be helpful

 

1) Through, slough.....

2) Tough, enough, slough (as in "slough off"), rough.....

3) Bough, (thank the Americans for not adding "plough" to this list)......

4) Thorough, dough......

 

I'm sure this isn't a complete list, but it does put a tiny bit of order to a disordered language even though it is not exactly a rule.  And you could teach that the "gh" is silent sometimes and other times not.  It would be helpful to know this, even though there is no precise rule.

 

My "sight-reading" (lazy sight reading, really--pronounce and guess the rest) older daughter began overcoming some of her frustrations with reading when we were reading some Spanish/English children's books and I was guiding her with pronunciation.  She was encouraged by the hard-and-fast rules and was sounding out the words with confidence.  It made me realize that her particular trouble was her perfectionism and the seeming randomness of English spelling and pronunciation.  (She is not dyslexic.)  She hasn't been as interested in Spanish and her reading, while it has improved with practice, has slipped back into her old habits.  

 

One of her difficulties is the "uhh" sound (as in the word "the") frequently used in English, and represented in the dictionary by the upsidedown "e", .  I know there is a name for that.   The sound can be used with the letter "a" ("abrupt"), "o" in "from"(which the dictionary lists as "u" instead, but the difference is subtle) and examples using every vowel.  The other day she spelled "bunny" B-A-N-N-Y, which confused me as to why she would spell it that way until she slowly pronounced back the word and as she passed by the "a" and said "uh" I knew what had happened.  Damned English!

 

I love English language history and language in general (and grammar, mainly for historical purposes like double negatives, etc.) and when we come across a prickly word in our reading I sometimes say afterwards that every word (or "odd spelling") has a story behind it and sometimes I know the story and will tell her.  For her, it is helpful to know in general that written English came long after the language itself, and there were many dialects (due to invasions of different tribes to the British Isles).  It is quite the story.


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Originally Posted by SweetSilver View Post

 

Quote:

No, but you could list word groups for the various sounds, and for some kids that would be enough to be helpful

nod.gif

 

I would love a system (perhaps I'll have to make it myself) that just started with the letter/sound combinations, any rules that go along with them explained well for the average person and then word groups to go along with the sound/rule. Combined with help for how to add prefixes, break words into syllables and etc. Very dry and to the point. I honestly think that's all DC needs. 

 

 

Quote:
For her, it is helpful to know in general that written English came long after the language itself, and there were many dialects (due to invasions of different tribes to the British Isles).  It is quite the story.

I see the future for us where (like some other PP's have mentioned) where I will be commiserating along with my DC about how confusing our spelling is. I can also relate to you talking about learning Spanish and how that added a level of clarity for your DC. I had absolutely NO understanding of the rules of English until I had to learn them in order to understand the curriculum of learning German. And, believe me, I have longed for the German language for my DC's issues with spelling. Though not for grammar. wink1.gif


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#30 of 51 Old 10-29-2012, 09:19 AM
 
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For some reason I was remembering reading Mother Goose rhymes to them when they were little.  Two things I remembered.

 

One, it was fun figuring out old pronunciations from the old rhymes

 

"There was a little girl/ who had a little curl right in the middle of her for'ead

When she was good she was very very good/ and when she was bad she was horrid"

 

....or anything rhyming "again" with "rain"

 

The other, just messing around with the oddities of spelling/pronunciation:

 

"Goosy goosy gander/whither dost thou wander"

 

.....and anything that tries to rhyme "food" with "good".  That used to get a few laughs from the girls when I'd read poems in a way to get everything to rhyme.  

 

It's been fun to keep this lighthearted, because reading English can be confounding and frustrating.  


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