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#1 of 22 Old 01-06-2013, 08:39 PM - Thread Starter
 
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DD (age 8) is reading at about a 6 yr level. She attended part of first grade last year, and homeschooled the second half and is now homeschooling for second grade. In school, she qualified for pullout for special reading support.

 

She had language delays and received speech therapy in the birth to three program, was at age-level when she turned three and didn't qualify for further services. She doesn't seem to have any receptive or expressive delays at all, currently, or any sign of having had a speech delay.

 

Her reading comprehension is excellent. She is above age level in comprehension. I read to her often during the day and we go through about 50 books every two weeks, a mixture of chapter books and picture books, whatever she likes.

 

But when she reads, it is very, very tedious and slow. She becomes extremely bouncy and highly distractible, playing with the dog, standing up to sing, sliding upside down on the couch, taking a drink, then another, then having to use the bathroom, then having to crawl back to the couch... She'll stare at the page for five minutes then suddenly blurt out the entire sentence, with correct inflection and correct recognition of the punctuation. She will often sing the sentence instead of reading it. She will get a sentence, then dance around the room, singing it over and over. Once she gets the sentence, she reads it quite well. But it takes her very long to get the sentence, and she'll often get stumped on words she knows quite well, or should know quite well, easy decodable words like "nod."

 

Seems like she has a great deal of trouble decoding. Seems like she's found singing a strategy that helps.

 

I'm wondering if I should have her evaluated for a specific language disability. The reason I would want to do so is if there are strategies specific to a particular disability that I should be using, I'd want to know. I've looked online and haven't found anything helpful. I've done as many modifications as I can think of for the bounciness (a swing in the house, large ball to bounce on, rocking chair, me sitting behind her doing brushing and other calming techniques that OTs use)  but reading kind of requires some degree of holding still so the words don't bounce around on the page, and anyway it doesn't really seem to be helping. She's actually lost ground since we started homeschooling.

 

I haven't had her vision checked; should I? She seems to see fine. She has no trouble with math or logic worksheets.

 

Should I even worry at all? Maybe her brain just needs to mature a bit or something. I'm not sure what to do. Everything I read says if there is a reading disability it should be addressed early. Homeschoolers tend to say don't push it, she'll read when she's ready.

 

I'm really confused and getting concerned about her reading.

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#2 of 22 Old 01-06-2013, 09:37 PM
 
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It wouldn't hurt to get her vision checked; our pediatricians do it when we go in for checkups here. Though, since she is reading some, that may not be an issue.

 

What kinds of things does she like to read? Do you have scheduled times for reading? Are you having her read to you or independently?


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#3 of 22 Old 01-06-2013, 09:44 PM
 
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Not an expert in reading delays, but yes, you definitely should have her vision checked. And you might seek out a developmental optometrist too, to make sure she doesn't have any tracking issues. Though I have to say, I don't know of very many kids who have seen developmental optometrists and been told "perfectly normal vision, no need for exercises and therapy," so there may be some overzealousness in diagnosis and intervention. But many parents swear by the help their kids received from developmental optometrists. I would keep an open mind, but also a sensible bit of skepticism if you go that route.

 

But just so you know, my youngest read early (age 4-ish) and was doing well with music note-reading as well. Her brother was getting his glasses prescription tweaked, so we made her a screening appointment with the same optometrist, because we remembered that the optometrist had suggested that if one child is a bit far-sighted, it's a good idea to check siblings as they get close to school-age. She was 5 and had never complained of any visual problems. She sat in the big chair and the optometrist pointed to the projected eye chart which started with a huge R. "Can you start at the top and tell me the letters you see?" he asked.

 

"Uhh.... " said my kid, "does it go any bigger?"

 

It turns out that she was so far-sighted that without glasses she would meet the definition of being legally blind. Her prescription ended up being for 7.5 diopters of correction: in the "extreme" realm. And we had no idea, nor did she.

 

Within a month of getting glasses her reading went from "advanced for a five-year-old" to Harry Potter level. 

 

I'm not saying vision is causing your dd's reading difficulties, but there is the possibility that a child can have no visual complaints or symptoms and still have pretty significant visual problems. Best to get that possibility off the table. I'd definitely get her checked!

 

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#4 of 22 Old 01-06-2013, 09:44 PM
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It could be a lot of things, one of which is her own personal pace/maturation for reading.

 

Yes, get her vision checked.  In addition to the standard vision tests, she should be checked by a developmental opthometrist.  A child can have 20/20 vision and still have other issues (tracking, convergence, etc) that would make it difficult to read. 

 

I do have a child with dyslexia aka "specific learning disability".  I tend to error on the side of caution because I know how frustrated the child who REALLY wants to read can get.  There are ways to help them learn this task.  My best resource is the yahoo group for dyslexia.  http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/dyslexiasupport2/

 

BTW, unless you need services, I don't know if I see the need for a diagnosis.  You can help her at home.  You just need to figure out how to help.  Obviously, if she has vision issues, work on those.  Dyslexia has nothing to do with intelligence.  Figuring things out is sometimes expensive, I found it better to put my money towards things that will help us vs a diagnosis that wasn't going to be helpful.  Fortunately, even if I were wrong about my dd, the programs for dyslexics also work with non-dyslexics though they can feel tedious if learning to read comes easily.  

 

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#5 of 22 Old 01-07-2013, 10:27 AM - Thread Starter
 
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What kinds of things does she like to read? Do you have scheduled times for reading? Are you having her read to you or independently?

 

Well, she doesn't really like to read anything by herself. But she likes to be read to.

 

We have lots of enticing books spread out in the living room and bedroom (Calvin and Hobbies, comic books, Bad Kitty, etc). When kids come over to play, they will pick up the books and read, but so far DD hasn't shown much interest.

 

Each day, she reads one book to me. It takes a good hour. We get lots of leveled readers from the library every two weeks, and she does pretty well with the level 10 and below, but really struggles with 15 and up (for reference, she was supposed to be reading above 24 at the start of second grade). We also do lots of language activities (sight word ping pong balls, writing back and forth in our Mama and Me journal, online letter generator, Reading Eggs, etc).

 

Books that she is really loving having me read to her right now are the Dragonbreath Series and just about anything by Roald Dahl. We have all the Junie B Jones and those are okay. She really like books that are action-packed and funny, and have animals.  

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#6 of 22 Old 01-07-2013, 10:38 AM - Thread Starter
 
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It could be a lot of things, one of which is her own personal pace/maturation for reading.

 

Yes, get her vision checked.  In addition to the standard vision tests, she should be checked by a developmental opthometrist.  A child can have 20/20 vision and still have other issues (tracking, convergence, etc) that would make it difficult to read. 

 

I do have a child with dyslexia aka "specific learning disability".  I tend to error on the side of caution because I know how frustrated the child who REALLY wants to read can get.  There are ways to help them learn this task.  My best resource is the yahoo group for dyslexia.  http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/dyslexiasupport2/

 

BTW, unless you need services, I don't know if I see the need for a diagnosis.  You can help her at home.  You just need to figure out how to help.  Obviously, if she has vision issues, work on those.  Dyslexia has nothing to do with intelligence.  Figuring things out is sometimes expensive, I found it better to put my money towards things that will help us vs a diagnosis that wasn't going to be helpful.  Fortunately, even if I were wrong about my dd, the programs for dyslexics also work with non-dyslexics though they can feel tedious if learning to read comes easily.  

 

Amy

 

I made an appointment with a pediatric opthalmologist. I also decided to contact one of the reading tutor agencies in our area, Advantage Tutoring Center, which incorporates visual, auditory and kinesthetic techniques. We're doing a PPP and this was one of the approved vendors on the list, so it would get paid for. I'll see what they say when they call me back.

 

We have pretty good insurance and pretty good access to services through our Parent Partnership Program with the school district, so I don't mind identifying the exact nature of the problem (if there is one) if there is a chance it will help things.

 

Thanks for the link and the advice. I can see I'm going to be spending a lot of time there :). It can't hurt to use techniques for dyslexia and there might be some fun stuff.

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#7 of 22 Old 01-07-2013, 10:55 AM
 
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As everyone else has said it could be anything from a diagnosed problem to just maturity.  Here has been our experience with learning to read, reading levels, reading interest, and just plain wanting to read. Out of our 4 children, one was reading at age 6 (1st grade; considered "normal range" back then), 2 not until grade 4-5, and one at age 4.  The 3 girls were home schooled for early elementary and our boy was in public school for elementary.  All 4 of them were capable (some more interested than the others) in reading Shakespeare and understanding it by middle school. 
 


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#8 of 22 Old 01-07-2013, 01:04 PM - Thread Starter
 
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As everyone else has said it could be anything from a diagnosed problem to just maturity.  Here has been our experience with learning to read, reading levels, reading interest, and just plain wanting to read. Out of our 4 children, one was reading at age 6 (1st grade; considered "normal range" back then), 2 not until grade 4-5, and one at age 4.  The 3 girls were home schooled for early elementary and our boy was in public school for elementary.  All 4 of them were capable (some more interested than the others) in reading Shakespeare and understanding it by middle school. 
 

 

That is really reassuring. Thank you.

 

I guess I'm concerned because everything else is being held up by her reading. I mean, what is the point of being able to do 3-4th grade pre-algebra problems or critical thinking worksheets if your mom has to read the word problems for you? I'll bet she'd just take off if she can get more skill in reading; she could pursue whatever she wanted without having to wait on me to sit down with her.

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#9 of 22 Old 01-07-2013, 01:40 PM
 
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I mean, what is the point of being able to do 3-4th grade pre-algebra problems or critical thinking worksheets if your mom has to read the word problems for you? 

 

I'm a parent of early readers, but I watched a family of late readers grow up and was stunned by the depth and breadth of their learning-without-reading. I think there's plenty of point in being able to do advanced math even if your parent needs to read word problems for you.

 

First of all, most real-life math problems don't present themselves in text, so even if she needs to be read to in order to get practice, the real-life skills she's learning will be useful to her. When she's out at a shop and needs to figure out if she can buy three packs of gum and pay tax out of her $5 bill, she'll use those skills. When she's trying to figure out how many stitches to cast on to do three repeats of the 12-stitch cable pattern, a 4-stitch border and a selvage stitch on each side, she won't need reading to use her math.

 

Second of all, working at more advanced math will give her intellectual challenge, help her learn learn problem-solving, persistence, hand-writing skills, and give her self-confidence and self-esteem a big boost. 

 

It is totally appropriate to tackle the reading difficulties if she's on board with that. But I think that it is human nature to enjoy doing what you know you are good at (and to not enjoy what you're not yet good at). So doing lots of learning that doesn't hinge on reading ability would be a really good idea in terms of maintaining her love of learning. With some creative thinking you'll probably be able to come up with lots of ideas, but here are some of the things I've seen later-readers learn that has really impressed me:

 

  • Math, of course. Especially mental math. Geometry, tesselations, abacus calculations, memorization of math facts, math guessing games, etc. etc.
  • Four-harness loom-weaving, reading and writing patterns for various weave patterns.
  • Knitting. Complicated patterns: based on knit and purl: cabling, lacework, ribbing.
  • Sewing: garments, bags, décor items, hand-sewing and machine-sewing
  • Needle felting, sculptural and 2-dimensional
  • Music. Especially the Suzuki way, since it is naturally built around delayed note-reading. Choral singing. Violin. Piano.
  • Dance. Gymnastics. Skiing. Unicycling. Juggling. Hula-hooping. 
  • Sleight-of-hand.
  • Audio-books: novels of course but also lots of non-fiction, mythology, history. Later readers tend to develop incredible aural memories. 
  • Videos: documentaries, and instructional lecture series on DVD. There are lots intended for pre-teens, but my kids enjoyed even some intended for teens and adults at age 8-12. The Teaching Company has some neat ones. High school history is well-presented. There are also great natural history and geography DVD series, things like Human Planet, Michael Palin's Himalaya, Planet Earth.
  • Second language learning. Rosetta Stone works very well for pre-readers. 
  • Science projects, demonstrations, experiments. Hands on science of any description, but especially long-term natural-science inspired projects like building a windowsill hydroponic system, birding, charting weather data, animal husbandry, etc.

 

I'm sure you're already making an effort to do a lot of this sort of thing, but maybe there are a couple of ideas in here that will inspire more. One of my violin students didn't read a scrap until she was almost 10. She was incredibly well-educated and capable at age 9.75, despite a complete lack of reading. Once she was reading well (and in her case it came quite quickly when it did) she suddenly had different ways to learn, but it certainly wasn't the case that her learning had been held back prior to that.

 

Miranda

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#10 of 22 Old 01-07-2013, 01:50 PM - Thread Starter
 
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What a great post, Miranda! And great ideas. I guess I hadn't been thinking about how math, and other things, can be, and already are, a large part of the things we do.

 

We're trying to work on knitting, but she's having trouble holding the needles and doing the stitches. I can't remember how I learned to knit; it was so long ago it feels like I always knew. Anyway, I feel like you've given me permission to do the kinds of things we'd really rather be doing anyway, and not having to worry about language skills so much.

 

Thank you!

 

I'm off to google "tessalations." Then we're gonna tesser all over the universe.

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That is really reassuring. Thank you.

 

I guess I'm concerned because everything else is being held up by her reading. I mean, what is the point of being able to do 3-4th grade pre-algebra problems or critical thinking worksheets if your mom has to read the word problems for you? I'll bet she'd just take off if she can get more skill in reading; she could pursue whatever she wanted without having to wait on me to sit down with her.


Is she an auditory learner?  If so, even is she was a fluent reader, having some one read the problems to her will engage her mind more than if she read it herself.  Dylan is an auditory learner.  We search out everything we can on tape for him to watch.  Then discuss what we have watched (frequently pausing to discussion) before he puts one word down on paper.  For math, I read the lessons to him and we discuss the examples (we both do them) before he sits down to do the problems.  If he's stumped on a problem, I'll read it to him.  Chances are that all he needs to finish that problem.  I think that the effort of reading sometime interfers with his comprehension and understanding of what is being asked of him.


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#12 of 22 Old 01-08-2013, 08:38 AM
 
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What a great post, Miranda! And great ideas.

ITA. And to add another anecdote, my own ds only had a bunch of sight words when he turned 8. He refused to have anything to do with phonics and got angry if anyone told him to "sound it out." So I just read whatever he asked. Sometimes he didn't know the words he asked me to read. Sometimes he suspected what the words meant but wanted to be sure by asking me to read it. And while he was reading at a 1st grade level while in 3rd grade, he was interested in 5th grade science. His lack of reading skills didn't slow down his learning in other areas, because he was homeschooled and had me available to read anything he needed read to him. He reads well now (at 11) though he'll still get the occasional unfamiliar word wrong. He doesn't like to read actual books but I think it's that he doesn't like to keep track of pages and where he is on a page. Ereaders or the computer are more his style. 


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#13 of 22 Old 01-08-2013, 09:41 AM
 
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Is it possible that she just doesn't like to read aloud? I ask because your example sounds like me as a child. I read very early and was always in the gifted reading programs but have always loathed reading aloud! I couldn't get my mouth to keep up with my eyes so I always read too fast and got yelled at by teachers and laughed at by peers.

You say her comprehension is good; is her speed better reading silently? I know it can be hard to tell.

I'd get her vision checked and then back off a little and see if she develops more fluency reading for pleasure with no pressure. The antics you describe make me think maybe she gets nervous being put "on the spot".
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#14 of 22 Old 01-08-2013, 10:05 AM
 
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does she read non-books? will she read directions to a game, a recipe, newspaper/magazine, instructions for a project,etc-all age level and above?

 

personally it sounds like it's too much to be spending an hour day on a book and her struggling be it vision or not-I agree with checking vision but if she is able to read other things that are not a required of sorts book, you might be well to back off for a bit

 

how is her writing? how much and what types is she doing?


 

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Just wanted to put in a good word for the old Electric Company, some of which is available on DVD.  Reading at our house has been improving steadily, but watching this series really put some fuel into their rocket boosters.  I loved it even as a 10yo kid, and I was a precocious reader from the age of 4yo.  My girls are 6 and 8 now, and it has helped dd1 immensely, improving her patience and skill with sounding things out, and has bumped dd2's confidence.  Now she has gone from sounding out a word once in a blue moon (p-aaaaaaaaaaa-nnnnnnnnnnnnnn-d-----------aaaaaaaaaaaaa-- sending me into full fidget mode!) to real reading.  I only wish I could find the rest of the episodes for them to watch online.

 

ETA: Especially since your daughter enjoys singing with reading, I recommend a series like this.  I find myself singing the silent E song to myself:  "who can turn a can into a cane?  Who can turn a man into a mane?"  The music is so much fun.  Be forewarned: "Groovy" is a useful, catchy word which my girls are beginning to use regularly thanks to this show!


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#16 of 22 Old 01-08-2013, 10:54 AM
 
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Just one thought on the issue of a diagnosis. If you get one, don't be afraid to use it. I have a variety of learning disabilities, but when I was young it was thought that children who were gifted and who were advanced readers couldn't have a learning disability, so no one looked at that as a possibility for me. I was labeled lazy by teachers, but since I knew I wasn't lazy, I gave myself another label--stupid. I decided the IQ tests were wrong and since I'd always been proud of being seen as bright, that was a real heartache for me.


When my oldest daughter was diagnosed with dysgraphia, the doctor read off a list of symptoms. I had all of them. I was so relieved, even as an adult, to realize it was just a learning disability. My kids know their disabilities (they are all adults now) and consider them just a clue as to what accommodations they need in various situations. They don't think of the label as a big deal because I treated it as a gift in myself. Kids know what something is wrong, and if you don't give them the correct name for it and the proper attitude, they'll come up with one that is inaccurate. I'm a big fan of getting a diagnosis for your disability, even though I know that isn't a popular attitude these days.

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#17 of 22 Old 01-08-2013, 04:31 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Is it possible that she just doesn't like to read aloud? I ask because your example sounds like me as a child. I read very early and was always in the gifted reading programs but have always loathed reading aloud! I couldn't get my mouth to keep up with my eyes so I always read too fast and got yelled at by teachers and laughed at by peers.
You say her comprehension is good; is her speed better reading silently? I know it can be hard to tell.
 

She loves to perform, and loves to read aloud in a dramatic, expressive, quite delightful manner. She loves to read especially to younger children for this reason. I don't think its performance anxiety, really, although I have noticed that she will not speak a sentence aloud until she is sure she has it, and will substitute another word for one she can't read, so that the audience doesn't notice she's have difficulty. Since she is homeschooled, I don't really think she has any idea of how well her reading is compared to peers, so she doesn't know that she is "behind." I imagine that will change as she gets older.

 

I can't tell if she is faster reading silently. I don't think so. She doesn't move her mouth or whisper to herself. I can only go by how long she stares at the page before she says the sentence aloud. She really works hard at getting it right before she will open her mouth. This also makes it hard to see how, or if, she is decoding. But when I ask her sound out the letters, she can't do it very well.

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#18 of 22 Old 01-08-2013, 07:24 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Just wanted to put in a good word for the old Electric Company, some of which is available on DVD.  Reading at our house has been improving steadily, but watching this series really put some fuel into their rocket boosters.  I loved it even as a 10yo kid, and I was a precocious reader from the age of 4yo.  My girls are 6 and 8 now, and it has helped dd1 immensely, improving her patience and skill with sounding things out, and has bumped dd2's confidence.  Now she has gone from sounding out a word once in a blue moon (p-aaaaaaaaaaa-nnnnnnnnnnnnnn-d-----------aaaaaaaaaaaaa-- sending me into full fidget mode!) to real reading.  I only wish I could find the rest of the episodes for them to watch online.

 

ETA: Especially since your daughter enjoys singing with reading, I recommend a series like this.  I find myself singing the silent E song to myself:  "who can turn a can into a cane?  Who can turn a man into a mane?"  The music is so much fun.  Be forewarned: "Groovy" is a useful, catchy word which my girls are beginning to use regularly thanks to this show!

 

Groovy! We have a CD of old Electric Company shows. She hasn't been interested, but maybe that's because there's too much competition with our other dvds like My Little Pony. But I was watching them the other day and surprised by how many actors I recognized. I had no idea people did Electric Company before they became famous. It was a pretty fun trip down memory lane for me.

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You've already got some great ideas. I just want to throw in a bit of my personal experience. I'm a former teacher of several subjects grades K-12. Before teaching I volunteered teaching adults to read. So when I decided to start teaching my then 4yo, I was armed and ready. I went through the best books & phonics including 100 Easy lessons, First Language Lessons, etc. He dreaded it. He hated it. He never acted out; that isn't his nature. Instead he just got lots of anxiety and withdrew. I tried every trick until finally I realized that it was more important that he love learning than learn to read at 4, and at 5, and at 6. And at 7, And at 8. By this time, I knew he knew the letters and could put them together but just hated it. So I continued to read aloud. Tons. And Tons. He loved the books and he developed a love for learning. I didn't put him in school because I knew he'd do terribly at reading. I knew the diagnostics test and I knew he'd fit into a category of either dysgraphia or dyslexia. I wanted to avoid the labeling at least till 3rd grade. Don't ask me why I picked this grade. Because he's a late bloomer, I let it go till 4th. At around age 10, after reading Calvin & Hobbes for a while, I deliberately got into a Harry Potter book then conveniently didn't have time to continue the chapter. He pestered me for at least a week until out of frustration he decided he'd go on without me. It worked. He was hooked. He didn't stop. Two years later, he is a non-stop, get-in-trouble, stop-reading kind of child. Insanely so. So, my thoughts:

1. Some research I came across talked about how eye development is the last little bit of development to take place in a child. Those little connections that transmit information are the last little things to develop in a body. Everyone's eyes just don't develop at the same pace just like toddlers don't walk at the same time.

2. My son has always... matured slowly... shall we say?

3. His retention is phenom. Phenomenal. Truly phenomenal. Not too long ago, while introducing a subject to him, he astounded me by already knowing all the details. I asked him how. He remembered the exact small book and location and the short but detailed story from at least... 5 or 6 years ago. Read once. Plus he often looks like he is doing anything but listening but can tell you detail by detail about what you've just read.

4. While his eyes may have developed late, his dexterity, scientific skill, physical kinesthetics is pretty impressive, too. As in I'm pretty sure his future job will be heavily kinesthetic impressive. So I like to think that if I had forced the reading when he wasn't developmentally ready, stunting may have occurred in another area from compensating, stress, or coping ...

5. I also recently discovered he needed glasses. The first thing the optometrist asked me was if he'd had a growth spurt. I was surprised he asked b/c he'd just grown about 2 inches in a few months. 2 shoe sizes. I asked him what that had to do with glasses. He said he always sees the kids right after they've had the growth spurts and something about how the growth affect the eyes, too. Since I never had him checked at a young age, I don't know if that contributed.

Anyway, none of this may be relevant, but I like to share this story just in case it does. Hope you get some answers soon. And I still believe, in my gut, that if a non-reading adult can learn to read and if reading programs in older, more educationally advanced countries don't begin till 3rd grade (more or less what I remember from grad school) then at 4, 5, 6, 7 & even 8, just read aloud a lot and keep the love alive. Though I know full well how scary that advice can sound and just how it feels.

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#20 of 22 Old 01-09-2013, 04:15 PM - Thread Starter
 
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You sound so much like me, Loftmama. I started DD on 100 Easy Lessons and the BOB books and CDs,and made Starfall my homepage. Like you, I decided to back off when I realized I could be doing more harm than good, in that she might lose or fail to develop a love for reading if I kept pressuring her. So I did back off for several years, and I told myself that if she hadn't developed more skill or more interest in reading by age 8, I would have to be more aggressive. Because I figured by age 8 the brain should be mature enough for reading (I read somewhere that, I think its Norway, they don't start children on academics until age 8).

 

But DD decided she wanted to go to public school. So she attended for kindergarten and half of first grade. That kind of ruined my "give her time" approach. They pulled her out and put her in a special class for reading. She now has the idea that she is supposed to be reading, and she wants to be able to read, but also somewhat dislikes the actual reading part. It is hard to figure out what is best for her, in terms of pushing her. I try really hard to make reading fun and if she really doesn't want to do it, I don't make her. It isn't like she has to sit there and read 10 pages if it takes her an hour before she is allowed to be done. She can stop whenever she wants to and we'd try again later, or find something else to do. I really don't want to ruin her love of reading. And in fact she loves being read to, loves books, loves picking out books for me to read to her.

 

I hadn't considered that even at age 8 it might be that her brain just needs more maturity in this area and time is all that is needed. That is good information for me to have. I thought enough time had passed that any difficulties I'm noticing were likely to be of a more permanent nature and not go away without intervention, really, and that now was the time to start working on them before she started using strategies that would have to be unlearned or that would slow her down. I could be wrong. I just don't know what the best thing to do is. Everytime I think I've got it figured out, I hear another point of view that is convincing, and I have doubts. I wish I could just get behind the "give her time until her brain matures" and not be tempted by  "early intervention for learning disabilities is much more effective than waiting." But I can't seem to fully embrace either one, and I'm so worried I'll end up really messing her up in this area.

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#21 of 22 Old 01-09-2013, 08:17 PM
 
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Bellingham Crunch, oh I know how hard that is! My hunch is that you have a very good gut instinct. How would testing hurt just to know? I've since learned of other kids who have been late readers like my son who later just explode! I've even heard of it not happening until around age 12 - which I don't know how I could've handled. It was a true gut check/ faith instinct for me. I also refrained from having the conversation with other parents because I was so paranoid and constantly felt tempted to see where other kids were. Someone today might think I was stretching the truth but it was truly like that and I had lots of anxiety. Oh what I meant to say is that I've learned - for my son - that it turns out all his learning is this way. Weird! Because I definitely did not learn about his type of learning in school. For math and for handwriting, I've experienced the same thing with him. I made him practice his handwriting. He loathed it. Dh would ask me if I was teaching him or if I was concerned, etc. I'd get more worried, defensive, agitated, etc. Then one day it dawned on me that maybe his handwriting is like his reading. When he's not developmentally ready for it, it's horrible. But when he's ready, it takes off at jet speed. With much anxiety, I stopped the writing lessons. As you might guess, his handwriting is beautiful. A perfect print. Wonderful handwriting. So now that I know this, I feel quite relieved. In the future, when I see that he seems really, really behind in an area or not "on level" I know that he is just where he needs to be and when he is ready for that level, he will speed right on through. Good luck. I wish it was an easy thing to know. I can not say one way or the other is right. And I don't mean to make the decision harder. Sorry. greensad.gif But I'm willing to bet that as an attentive, thoughtful Mom, you will know the right thing to do. And you know what else? I bet either way you choose she will still be a reader. After all, it sounds like she loves books and she's not going to always want to wait on mom to read the story.

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#22 of 22 Old 01-09-2013, 10:05 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thank you, Loftmama. Your words are very encouraging and reassuring. I think I can relax a bit. I'm sure they'll find problems during the eval, cause that's what they do, but if the tutoring isn't working for her and it isn't fun, we won't do it. Maybe I'll learn some things I can do myself with her that are fun for us both. I guess it won't hurt to give it a try. Its wonderful to hear that your son is doing great and that he benefitted from you following your instincts. I wish my instincts had more backbone :)

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