Independent reading for a almost 7 year old - Mothering Forums

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Old 03-31-2013, 06:53 PM - Thread Starter
 
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My son is very much trying to read books on his own.  This is great and I want to encourage that by giving him books that are slightly above his level.  He really enjoys telling people that he read a whole book by himself: it is a great boost for his confidence.  He is currently going through the Henry and Mudge books and he is enjoying them.  He also loves serials instead of a bunch of new, unrelated books.  He has the audio for the Magic Tree House series.  

 

I am looking for something that is below the Magic Tree house reading level that is still a "chapter" book but above the Henry and Mudge ones.  Any ideas?  I am not interested in snarky books where the protagonists call each other names, get in trouble all the time etc.  I dislike Junie B. Jones, for example.  I have checked out the Littles, the Borrowers and the Boxcar Kids but they will all require help for him to read through.  Any ideas of books that are slightly below the Magic Tree House levels but above the Henry and Mudge?  

 

Thanks in advance Mamas!

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Old 03-31-2013, 08:03 PM
 
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The Mercy Watson books by Kate DiCamillo are fantastic!!!  Last I checked there are 6  :)


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Old 03-31-2013, 08:25 PM
 
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The "Easy-to-Read Spooky Tales" by Veronika Martenova Charles (see this example) were the first chapter books my DS read.  They may not be any longer or harder than a Henry and Mudge book, but they might feel more like a real chapter book.

 

The Nate the Great books are about the same reading level as Henry and Mudge, but longer.  I think some of them are divided into chapters, but I don't know if all of them are.  They were the next chapter books DS tried.

 

The Cam Jansen books seem to be just a bit harder than Nate the Great.

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Old 04-01-2013, 11:55 AM
 
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Bailey School Kids Jr. Chapter Books (note "Jr", because they also have slightly harder ones that aren't marked as Jr).

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Old 04-01-2013, 12:36 PM
 
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Maybe Encyclopedia Brown?  Those are bit harder that Nate the Great.  We love both.


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Old 04-01-2013, 02:32 PM
 
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No book recommendations, but if he's just now starting to try to read on his own I wonder if it would make sense to give him books that he is very able to read independently so he can gain confidence. If it's too hard he might get discouraged and stop reading. If he's anything like my son it would be for a VERY long time. I say get him books that he can succeed with for now. You can challenge him once he's gained some experience and confidence.


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Old 04-01-2013, 10:48 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thank you all for the recommendations, guys!  I am going to keep every single one in mind and I am going to go ahead with Nate the Great.  

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SundayCrepes View Post

No book recommendations, but if he's just now starting to try to read on his own I wonder if it would make sense to give him books that he is very able to read independently so he can gain confidence. If it's too hard he might get discouraged and stop reading. If he's anything like my son it would be for a VERY long time. I say get him books that he can succeed with for now. You can challenge him once he's gained some experience and confidence.

 

This is almost exactly what I am trying to do except, I want him to be reaching a tiny, weency bit.  He himself enjoys that kind of challenge.  

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Old 04-01-2013, 11:08 PM
 
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Now, or soon :

Abracadabra

Nate the Great
Secrets of Droon
Bailey School Kids
Cam Jansen

There's another series, with animals who are detectives. I can't remember what it's called right now.

Mrs. Piggle Wiggle
Amelia Badelia (I think I'm spelling it wrong)


When older :

Jigsaw Jones
A to Z Mysteries
Deltora Quest
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Old 04-02-2013, 06:15 AM
 
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Can you take him to a library and see what he likes? Reading can be such an individual thing

 

A lot of longer books bear in mind are not harder, just have more words, iyswim. So I'd say something like Farmer Boy/the Little House books are not hard to read, especially the early ones, there are just a lot of (easy) words. OTOH I'd say the Borrowers is pretty hard.  Many picture books are harder to read than the "step up" chapter books.

 

When my son was starting out reading the two things he loved were fact books-I think, in retrospect, because there are loads of visual clues that help beginning readers (WHY are there no reading schemes based on fact books?). Second he liked comics-Calvin and Hobbs, Asterix, Tintin. Again, lots of clues in the pictures. My daughter went more for the lots of easy fiction approach (My Naughty Little Sister and the Joe and Timothy books, the Aurora books, the Dorrie books, Astrid Lindgrens stuff, the Little House books and the Milly Molly Mandy books were all big hits, even though the protagonists were all a little younger. These are all very British/European.) but also learnt a lot from stuff like how-to- books (how to draw, how to sew) -Usborne does a lot of these in the UK, not sure if there's a US equivalent? Thing is, with these books you get quick feedback on how well you've read something.


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Old 04-02-2013, 10:18 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fillyjonk View Post

Can you take him to a library and see what he likes? Reading can be such an individual thing.

 

Wish I could. No library close by where we live.  We have had to make accommodations for that by outright buying books.

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Old 04-03-2013, 03:13 PM
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Have you read the "Down Girl and Sit" books.  I believe there are four of these.  I would say that they are at the level you describe.  They are really funny books, from the perspective of the dog.  The dog believes her name is "Down Girl."  The neighbor's dog is "Sit" and they have loads of fun together.  They warrant repeated readings at our home.  Amazon gives the first few pages if you "look inside the book" so you can get a good idea of the actual reading level.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Smarter-Than-Squirrels-Down-Girl/dp/076145571X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1365023445&sr=1-1&keywords=down+girl+and+sit

 

Amy


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Old 05-09-2013, 11:57 PM
 
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You might consider (not quite yet but probably soon) Commander Toad is a great series also - less words per page than Magic Treehouse but more complex vocabulary and really funny.

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