Singapore Math Intensive Practice Books - Mothering Forums
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#1 of 7 Old 04-05-2013, 06:58 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I just noticed that my son is blowing through the 1B workbook.  At the rate he is going, he will probably finish in about 4 weeks. I would like to go ahead and put something else in his math shelf so that he has something else to do if his level of interest holds.  He seems to have such a good flow going.  

 

I looked on the SM website and saw that there are some intensive practice books.  I am wondering if I should order those for him or go to 2A straight.  I see also there is one "challenging word problems" book for each level as well.  

 

Any of you used the IP books or the CWP books?  Do you recommend them?  Just wondering how it worked for others who do SM.  

 

Thanks Mamas :) 

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#2 of 7 Old 04-06-2013, 03:05 AM
 
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Well we did Miquon at this age and transitioned to Singapore so not sure I'm the best person to answer but I'd say it depends on your son.

 

My experience with kids and math is that really, anything is good.More practice won't hurt, pushing on and  stretching him won't hurt.

 

What I'd say it comes down to is him. Does he prefer to be stretched or to feel competent?

 

I have one of each and with my son, who really doesn't love being out of his depth mathematically, we've taken things a lot slower than my daughter who is mathematically more daring. Just a totally different approach, my son worked methodically and quite slowly through all the Miquons then Singapore from, iirc, 5A onwards, and now is spending time consolidating primary math by studying maths-heavy physics/mechanics having finished up Singapore (this might sound a little more impressive than it is-I'd say everything you need for basic physics is in primary math).

 

My daughter is nearly done with Miquon but I am sure she will need to stop and consolidate because she is more about the concepts.  Her tables, for example, aren't great and that will hold her back at some point. (although she spends a lot of her computer time doing Timez Attack which really helps) Horses for courses is what I'm trying to say. Looking at my kids, I'd guess my daughter will probably finish up Singapore at around the age my son did, around 9 (though we might move to Beast Academy rather than Singapore for her). I could without a doubt push her through quicker but I don't see the point-I think she'd get more out of it by taking it slower and really getting the maximum benefit. 

 

Oh and just to say, its really not that great when they get to the end of Singapore. There's nothing obviously to fill the gap between primary and secondary maths and if you have kids who like maths that is a real problem. Singapore really needs to produce something enrichment-like for those end-of-primary years IMO.

 

Not sure how old your son is but have you discussed this one with him?


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#3 of 7 Old 04-06-2013, 05:19 AM - Thread Starter
 
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My son is turning seven in a few short weeks!scared.gif  I just can't believe how fast they are growing!  

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What I'd say it comes down to is him. Does he prefer to be stretched or to feel competent?

 

He enjoys being stretched but slowly.  I would say he prefers feeling competent more.  I basically heavily scaffold his learning process when it comes to math and reading.  He is a perfectionist and failing at something is really painful for him (he is learning the benefits of trial/error/failing/trying again, via his artistic pursuits where there is no ridged right or wrong answer).  Anyway, I find incremental, indirect approach that meshes well with daily routine is the best approach.  

 

Interestingly, he resists most help from me.  If I try to explain a concept to him because I see him having difficulty, he tends to blow me off and just say "I know, I know!!!" So, I generally wait until he approaches me.  He used to sit by me to work on his math workbook but he no longer does that.  He just does it on his own while I am gone and when I come back, he shows me what he has done.  I check, point out errors if there are any and he makes corrections and moves on. This is to say that, he is learning his math independently by just looking at the examples and attempting to complete the questions.  So, the slow approach would probably work better since he fiercely holds on to his autonomy and hates being  "instructed" in any way.  

 

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Looking at my kids, I'd guess my daughter will probably finish up Singapore at around the age my son did, around 9 (though we might move to Beast Academy rather than Singapore for her). I could without a doubt push her through quicker but I don't see the point-I think she'd get more out of it by taking it slower and really getting the maximum benefit. 

 

My son finished the 1A workbook in six weeks.  I think he may finish the 1B in an even shorter time. He was not doing much formal math for most of the year. All of a sudden in the middle of Feb, he started and now keeps on going speedily.  He has a nice daily routine going for himself.  While I think he could jump straight to 2A without any extra level 1 stuff --  however because he is enjoying learning his math completely on his own (which I think is really cool), I feel like we should go with the gradual progress route.  That is why I was asking about the IP and challenging word problems books.  I am def. going to go slow but steady with my son's math.

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Oh and just to say, its really not that great when they get to the end of Singapore. There's nothing obviously to fill the gap between primary and secondary maths and if you have kids who like maths that is a real problem. Singapore really needs to produce something enrichment-like for those end-of-primary years IMO.

 

Not sure how old your son is but have you discussed this one with him?

 

Yes, I remember your previous post about what to do next, after finishing Singapore.  I took some mental notes smile.gif  As always, thank you for taking the time out to share your insight. Always valuable!  Writing it all out like this, sharing here and then reading other people's experiences is really helpful!  I know no other homeschoolers/unschoolers in real life. lol.  

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#4 of 7 Old 04-07-2013, 03:35 PM
 
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Emaye he sounds very like my son. I'm pretty sure I could have really pushed him to finish up Singapore a lot before he did actually but part of the value of the experience for him I think was in being pretty self directed. He hated having anyone explain anything to him-still does.

 

Now, he's nine and is doing physics and astronomy and using maths there (he's just using standard physics and astronomy texts though I'm really on the look out for something less word-dense for him). He's self directed enough to figure a lot of it out but he's also identified people who explain stuff to his satisfaction eyesroll.gif mainly people in the family who can explain particular things well-we're lucky that most people in the family have science degrees which is obviously helpful. So those years of taking stuff slowly were really not wasted as they have given him decent skills in terms of finding stuff out for himself.

 

Sounds like your son is having a great time, which is what matters more than anything! 

 

I'm not in the US so I'm not sure how easy it is for you to get the extra books. Over here they are pretty cheap and I could certainly resell, say on Amazon or elsewhere, if they weren't suitable. Could that be an option, if you can't take a look at them? FWIW I've pretty much always let my kids have the final say over which books they've used so I'm used to doing this. 


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#5 of 7 Old 04-08-2013, 03:26 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fillyjonk View Post

 

Now, he's nine and is doing physics and astronomy and using maths there (he's just using standard physics and astronomy texts though I'm really on the look out for something less word-dense for him).

What books are you using?  I think my dd might like to try these.


no longer momsling.GIF or ecbaby2.gif orfly-by-nursing1.gif ... dd is going on 10 (!) how was I to know there was a homeschool going on?

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#6 of 7 Old 04-08-2013, 03:58 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fillyjonk 

 

Now, he's nine and is doing physics and astronomy and using maths there (he's just using standard physics and astronomy texts though I'm really on the look out for something less word-dense for him). He's self directed enough to figure a lot of it out but he's also identified people who explain stuff to his satisfaction eyesroll.gif mainly people in the family who can explain particular things well-we're lucky that most people in the family have science degrees which is obviously helpful. So those years of taking stuff slowly were really not wasted as they have given him decent skills in terms of finding stuff out for himself.

 

Your son sounds awesome! 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fillyjonk View Post

 

I'm not in the US so I'm not sure how easy it is for you to get the extra books. Over here they are pretty cheap and I could certainly resell, say on Amazon or elsewhere, if they weren't suitable. Could that be an option, if you can't take a look at them? FWIW I've pretty much always let my kids have the final say over which books they've used so I'm used to doing this. 

 

Yeah, I think I am gonna buy them and just check them out.  If it doesn't work then we will move on to something else.  By the way, he is loving brainpop (the regular version).  He still does jr but he goes back and forth now.  

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#7 of 7 Old 04-09-2013, 12:21 PM
 
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rumi, he's literally just using texts from the library, nothing fancy at all. A physics or astronomy self-teaching book for adults is pretty standard in what it covers really. I am away from home right now but I think they are published by Penguin, which is a UK company. They are really nothing special at all, and one thing I want to point out is that he is working at an absolute snail's pace, following leads here and there, looking stuff up on the internet, chatting with his people ROTFLMAO.gif  and wandering off to build things that blow up. He goes to our local astronomy club (run by the university, for adults but they'll accept kids with adults) and also enjoys sailing which I think have both helped. Science Jim was a resource he liked when he was a little younger, and provided an excellent springboard, the problem was that it prides itself on being maths lite, which is great, but meant he wasn't getting all the answers he wanted. Sorry I can't be more helpful really. I'd love to find a non-patronising, not-too-US based, secular text for him because what he is using is far from ideal but he is basically happy with it. 

 

Emaye good luck with it! Hope it goes well. We're hoping to get our hands on Beast Academy soon too for my 7 year old (international shipping from the Art of Problem Solving is NOT straightforward!) - might that be another option, at least a year or two down the line?


Raising Geek_Generation_2.0 :LET ds= 10 ; LET dd1= ds - 2; LET dd2=dd-2; IF month=0.67 THEN LET ds = ds+1; 
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