Early preparation for homeschooling? - Mothering Forums
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#1 of 8 Old 05-14-2013, 08:19 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Hi everyone,

I know that I still have some time since my son is 17 months old but my husband and I are already seriously considering homeschooling.  I already consider myself to be homeschooling my toddler since he watches and learns from everything we do.  But is there anything we should be doing to prepare at the moment or is it too early? Thanks so much! :-)

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#2 of 8 Old 05-15-2013, 10:56 AM
 
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If you want to, it might be nice to research now. Look into different styles, groups in your area, maybe a couple of general homeschooling books. Although when he gets bigger you might change your mind anyway.

A couple of years in and I have a lot more confidence than I thought I would. I really thought I'd go with a box curriculum once dd was "school age" but I'm still piecing things together and really like it that way.

Good luck whatever you decide :)


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#3 of 8 Old 05-15-2013, 04:24 PM
 
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I highly recommend reading these two books:

 

Einstein Never Used Flashcards is an easy to read book about how young children learn. Spoiler alert: Let them play

http://www.amazon.com/Einstein-Never-Used-Flashcards-Learn--/dp/1594860688/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1368660143&sr=8-1&keywords=einstein+never+used+flashcards

 

Legendary Learning is my favorite homeschooling book. It talks about how Teddy Roosevelt, Thomas Edison, The Wright Brothers, Agatha Christie, etc. were homeschooled. Real people with real successes (it helps that they were raised with the same philosophy we are using with our kids.)

http://www.amazon.com/Legendary-Learning-Homeschoolers-Self-Directed-Excellence/dp/0983151008/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1368660271&sr=1-1&keywords=legendary+learning


Created an instant family (7/89 and 5/91) in 1997. Made a baby boy 12/05 adopted a baby girl 8/08. Ask me about tandem adoptive nursing. Now living as gluten, dairy, cane sugar, and tomato free vegetarians. Homeschooling and loving it.

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#4 of 8 Old 05-15-2013, 06:36 PM
 
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I second the Einstein book.  It's so good!  I also agree that now is a great time to investigate all your options and try to get a feel for what style fits your family.  That's a big project, so if you have the energy to do it now, dive in!
 


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#5 of 8 Old 05-15-2013, 09:26 PM
 
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My recommendation is to use this time to cultivate habits that will help you be a good HSing parent:  

 

*Create a space that supports his play and his creativity.  

 

*Watch for and support his interests--for now that is as simple as showing him what you are doing if he asks, letting him have try using whatever tools you are using.  In a year or so, it will mean borrowing books and videos from the library that reflect his interests--or yours-- and possibly finding more active ways to pursue interests (pottery sessions, drum circles, trips to the aquarium or tide pools at the beach-- etc.)

 

*Make a point to open your life and your activities to him, even if t means it will take more time.

 

*Support his curiosity.  Let him know it is welcome, and not a problem.

 

*Make extra time in your outings to allow for spontaneity based on his curiosity--and yours, too! 

 

*Combat parental torpor!  Resist the temptation to say "no" to a game or activity just because you are feeling dull.

 

*As he gets towards preschool age, start a practice "homeschool calendar" and keep track of "schoolish" things he does during the day.  This will train your eye to look for what is "valuable" to schooling in the less obvious times of an ordinary day.

 

I'm sure I can think of more things, but the point is: get yourself ready to go-- he will do just fine without any "preparation" you can add.  


Give me a few minutes while I caffeinate.
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#6 of 8 Old 05-16-2013, 01:06 AM
 
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My quote function never seems to work properly but I'm basically doing a yeahthat.gif to SweetSilver's post.

 

My roots are in unschooling and thats what I've always veered back to and where I go to make decisions. I'd actually come to this long before my own kids were born, probably when I was a teenager myself. So I think what I'm suggesting is use this time to really consolidate your philosophy. TBH I don't even think its necessary to work out how you want to homeschool but more the "what do you believe in" and "whys". What I did read a lot of when my kids were small was John Holt. I'd read all his stuff previously but that was more stuff relevant to me and my learning (Collected Letters and Never Too Late). I remember when my kids were small going back and reading again his stuff about little kids and slightly older kids, and also pretty much every issue of GWS (had some print copies from FUN books but there is an online archive somewhere). I am a big fan of GWS and fora like these-I think its so incredibly helpful to see people actually struggling with real life issues around home/unschooling rather than there being a "correct" answer. Its pretty inspiring to me :-)


Raising Geek_Generation_2.0 :LET ds= 10 ; LET dd1= ds - 2; LET dd2=dd-2; IF month=0.67 THEN LET ds = ds+1; 
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#7 of 8 Old 05-16-2013, 11:31 AM
 
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Quote:

 

*Create a space that supports his play and his creativity.  

 

*Watch for and support his interests--for now that is as simple as showing him what you are doing if he asks, letting him have try using whatever tools you are using.  In a year or so, it will mean borrowing books and videos from the library that reflect his interests--or yours-- and possibly finding more active ways to pursue interests (pottery sessions, drum circles, trips to the aquarium or tide pools at the beach-- etc.)

 

*Make a point to open your life and your activities to him, even if t means it will take more time.

 

*Support his curiosity.  Let him know it is welcome, and not a problem.

 

*Make extra time in your outings to allow for spontaneity based on his curiosity--and yours, too! 

 

*Combat parental torpor!  Resist the temptation to say "no" to a game or activity just because you are feeling dull.

 

*As he gets towards preschool age, start a practice "homeschool calendar" and keep track of "schoolish" things he does during the day.  This will train your eye to look for what is "valuable" to schooling in the less obvious times of an ordinary day.

 

I knew I'd think of more:

 

*Model what you want him to learn.  For example:

 

* If you want him to like reading and writing, don't just read to him, read things for yourself.  If most of your "writing" is done on the computer, pick up paper and pencil and start writing your grocery lists.  Same for other skills--making and listening to music--and interests--math and science.  If it's part of your life, it's more likely to be part of his. 

 

*Be interested in things for yourself.  Learning is not --or shouldn't be-- just for kids.  Show your interest, curiosity and enthusiasm about the world around you.

 

* Find out where the tools are you need to try things yourself.  Don't put it off to "Momma doesn't know how". 

 

*But don't be afraid to show that you don't know about everything.  "Let's find out" or "I bet Daddy/BF/ Aunt/MIL/Neighbor knows.  Let's ask!"

 

*As an addition to that last one-- be willing to learn along side him.  Scratch the old model of "all-knowing-teacher-and -empty-vessel-student".  Discover the world together--it never ends!

 

Those are all facets of the same diamond.


Give me a few minutes while I caffeinate.
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#8 of 8 Old 05-24-2013, 07:09 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Wow! Thank you so much everyone! This is a great start.  You've all post such beautiful advice.  Thanks!

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