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#1 of 28 Old 09-01-2013, 05:54 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Hi I need some advice, why did you decide to homeschool? I am feeling very torn right now. Right now we live in the suburbs of a big city and the schools are pretty good but I still think about homeschooling. However, my dh would like us to move to a town with not so great schools. Right now I have a lo who goes to preschool.  I don't know if I can give her everything she needs as far as socialization exc. Also I don't know if I can provide her with the education she deserves, I am not a teacher. Any advice? Thank you!

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#2 of 28 Old 09-01-2013, 04:29 PM
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First, you don't need to be a teacher.  That is a big misconception that people have.  Most teachers will tell you that they learned classroom management and group style teaching techniques.  This isn't relevant in homeschool.  Preschool can be awesome.  All my kids loved their preschools.  

 

We live very near a "great" school.  We choose to homeschool.  I originally planned to homeschool and then enrolled my dd in kindy because I was expecting another baby and I wasn't sure of myself.  She loved kindy.  I thought that I must have been crazy to consider hs.  Things changed in first grade.  The stuff on the playground was awful.  Backstabbing (yes at grade 1), boyfriends, requests to shave & wear bras, etc.  DD wasn't challenged.  She was tested and admitted to the 1 day/wk gifted program at her school.  This was awesome!  Second grade was great.  We had a teacher that didn't put up with the stuff from grade1, and the gifted program gave my dd an outlet she needed.  Then, we came to 3rd grade.  There were so many behavior problems in the class, it was crazy.  My dd was bored most of the day.  She came to us and asked if she could hs.  She knew it was an option (we gave her the choice in first grade).  We agree to try it for the rest of the year.  She was able to remain in the gifted program.  We LOVED the flexibility that homeschool gave us.  She had challenges and time to dive into projects.  

 

Meanwhile, my second child was in kindy.  She really didn't like it.  I didn't want to pull every one out at once (scared that I would be overwhelmed) and her kindy was only half day.  I noticed some interesting things about her though and hoped that the school would be able to help me.  She started first grade.  She was still having issues (I suspected APD or dyslexia but the teacher said I was wrong).  I called special services for help.  They said she had to be two full grade levels behind before they would test her.  She came home crying daily.  She cried before school.  She had so many GI problems we went to a specialist.  We pulled her out at winter break and her GI problems were solved within 2 weeks.  I learned techniques for teaching a dyslexic.  Since she has been homeschooling, she has truly flourished!  She is so confident, we get comments all the time about her.  For her, homeschooling was literally the BEST decision we ever made.  

 

Now, I have a third child.  She wanted to go to kindy.  She kinda liked it.  She wanted to do first grade.  She kinda liked it.  She did not get into the gifted program.  She is a perfectionist and was constantly comparing herself to her classmates.  Her attitude was very challenging last winter/spring.  She decided to try out homeschooling this year.  She knows that she can go back to school if she doesn't like hs.  However, her attitude/behavior is already so much better.  She has relaxed and has started to accept mistakes as part of learning.  We have to reaffirm that for her a lot though.  I have hopes.  However, if she does go back that will be ok too.  I am flexible enough in my thinking to realize that she may like the environment of a set schedule and people all around.  I just want what is best for my kids.  

 

Amy

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#3 of 28 Old 09-02-2013, 04:05 AM
 
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We started loosely in kinder because our school district at the time was awful. Compulsory age here is 6, so we, er I, used pre-k and kinder as experimental years. By 1 st, I wasn't secure, but had some confidence in what we were doing. We have since moved and We have two students, but I can't imagine my kids thriving in falling systems the way they do at home. Our current district actually does ok. Should we have a need for a public school situation, I would be remorseful and reluctant, but I think they would do fine overall.

Right now, our real hurdle will be high school. Dh has always been a year-by-year advocate while I'm in for the long haul. We both agree that high school should be up to each child (however I have some feelings that they should opt for charter while dh doesn't bother to research and feels ps provides a more "worldly" -*gag!*- experience.) If our children should opt for school, I could see one in charter and one in public school- unless we could afford a private school for both.
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#4 of 28 Old 09-02-2013, 05:09 AM
 
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We started because we live internationally so our choices in schools are not very good, and when the cost is considered, the choices become downright miserable. I use an online international school for curriculum and teaching support. A lot of the stuff Amy (AAK) describes with her dd happened with our dd in second grade. Ds was in fifth that year and I am pretty sure neither kid learned a new concept that year. I was considering moving back to the US with the kids, the school situation had been so poor. And the money was outrageous--more for the two kids' school than I had ever earned in a single year's salary back when I worked outside the home.

 

What I didn't know was how much we would love the scheduling flexibility. We travel kind of a lot, and we can take trips basically whenever we want right now. Both kids are learning to use technologies to communicate, but at the same time, since we are home, we can relax enough to focus on things like handwriting, too. We block schedule art and work through two week's worth at a time, so the kids don't have to interrupt sessions if they want to work to finish a piece. At the same time, they get to learn about things like meal planning, grocery shopping, cooking, laundry and keeping house throughout the day. My hope is they'll be capable in more than academic pursuits by the end of our homeschool adventure. Right now, the plan is for them to go to a B&M high school when the time comes (when ds is in grade 9 or 10), but that could also change based on how their learning goes.

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#5 of 28 Old 09-02-2013, 08:49 AM
 
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What are the advantages to the move for the kids and you?

 

I think if you have social kids, this is something to consider when deciding to HS. I have social kids. For them they like not just to have friends and see friends for playdates etc, but just the buzz of being around others. Just being in a room, even if no one is talking to you, but knowing there are lots of people to get to know. I get that. Its important for them to spend time socialising without adults hovering. Scouts, band, relaxed sports all fill this need, and they are all available to us nearby. Its the main reason we've stayed where we are now. (dp would love to live rurally and I'd like to move back to the capital which is where I'm from). There are different types of social but the one that makes a kid like school is often, IME, that thing of just relishing being around a lot of other people.

 

It sounds as though there are not many activities locally-is that right? Given that you've said you have social kids, that's what would keep me from moving.

 

I think you probably can give her what she needs teaching wise. I think most people can teach a small kid what they need to know. However, whether you want to or not is another matter. It sounds like you are drawn to more structured, sit down work-is that fair? If so, then that's work for you. You might love it when you try it but its still work for you.

 

TBH it sounds like you are happy, your daughter is happy, and yet you are considering a move, so I guess there's a pretty good reason for moving? Does that translate in to any benefits at all for you and your daughter?


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#6 of 28 Old 09-07-2013, 01:33 AM
 
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Hello,

 

My reasons for homeschooling are similar to what has already been stated above by other posters, namely the need to get away from the rigid structure/curriculum offered by most traditional schools and to keep my kids away from getting badly influenced by kids with indecent manners/behaviors/attitudes. I live abroad too right now and like ljooj, we also felt like the schools here are not up to our standards. Alot of them place an excessive focus on testing and memorization, which I personally don't believe leads to much learning especially for particular subjects. Also when my daughter did used to attend school here, she would witness kids misbehaving constantly, from bullying to stealing. I also like that homeschooling allows me to have a more flexible schedule throughout the day and lets my kids have time to themselves to just relax and play. Hope this helps!


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#7 of 28 Old 09-08-2013, 04:46 PM
 
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We homeschool because one son wasn't being challenged enough in school and he is the type that will give you the bare minimum if that is all you ask of him. The other one was falling so far behind and bringing home 4-5 hrs a night in homework in 7th grade and bringing home poor grades. He needed one on one time. Now both kids are doing quite well, esp compared to where they used to be.
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#8 of 28 Old 09-17-2013, 10:52 AM
 
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My DS (who is now 5) was having too many issues at daycare. They had us so stressed out with having a very active little one that they almost convinced us something was wrong with him. After telling them to go 'screw themselves' (sorry!) Hubby and I enrolled him in a home schooling Christian based program that my aunt suggested. It was absolutely the best decision we ever made. He is THRIVING and I wouldn't have it any other way.

 

there are about 7 kids in the program and the teacher was a math major plus she also tutors all the way to college. My kid is so far ahead of where the kindergarteners are in public school and I couldn't be prouder. We are seriously considering leaving him in her program through 2nd grade and then putting him into public schools.


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#9 of 28 Old 09-19-2013, 05:35 AM
 
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I have one in kinder and 1 in preschool.

For me the biggest hurdle in deciding to homeschool was the panicked thought, "how am I going to teach trig & chemistry?!" Then it hit me...oh wait...I only have to worry about teaching this year.

I am teaching my kids how to teach themselves. We are starting with building intrinsic desires to learn...whatever. You can get a curriculum...I don't.

Socialization...in VT a Homeschooler can take up to 40% in the school and still be considered a Homeschooler. My son decided to take art, music, and gym. He is dropping the art class because it is a waste of his time. They spent 15 minutes in line! Out of 40 minutes! Every hour! He is considering dropping music but it is next to gym that he loves. We also belong to a homeschool group. He met a girl and they are best friends. We see each other whenever possible. Homeschool kids are different...they aren't intimidated by talking to adults or being in multiaged groups...and some learn to be okay with themselves so the time in between seeing people is okay. I use to worry (a lot) about my kids not having enough socialization until I saw them insert themselves in a group of kids playing seamlessly. Now they have a solid friend friend they care about and cares about them.

I homeschool because
-our school isn't very good. (I went into the elementary school and EVERYTHING is hung for view...comfortable viewing for someone 64" tall! I laughed at the look both ways before crossing the street poster. This makes no sense!).
-my husband and I didn't do well in the system. I became a behavioral disruption because I was bored and stopped learning (undiagnosed dyslexic living in one of the most desired towns/school systems in America)
-my kinder can read at 2-3 grade level but refuses to write, color, paint, etc...(dysgraphia???)
-I am raising my kids bilingually
-I don't like the direction the institution is headed in
-I don't believe kinder should be full day. I question whether 1st should be full day.
-because I can

With that said, if you are considering homeschool, you are willing to be involved. If you send your kid to school, keep at it every day. Become involved in the school, become involved in his day. Many kids go to bad schools and become successful. I dare say it might give you a statistical edge getting into college. ^_^
Just because you homeschool this year, doesn't mean you have to homeschool next year or forever.
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#10 of 28 Old 09-19-2013, 02:00 PM
 
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I have philosophical issues with public education.  I simply do not believe that children learn best when taught mass instruction for 6 hours a day by a hired "expert."  None of us do.  Especially for our boys.  Boys are not wired to learn at a desk, sitting still for hours on end.  They need freedom to move and explore.  So many public school children are medicated.  It's shameful.  

 

Don't doubt yourself mama.  You can give your child everything they need in terms of an education.  Some of that will undoubtedly mean finding others to work with her but that's o.k.  For instance, my 13 year old takes guitar lessons.  That is outside my scope.  There are so many resources out there.  It's a great time to be homeschooling!

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#11 of 28 Old 09-21-2013, 05:42 AM
 
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I had always considered homeschooling, but after divorcing my ex and having to return to work, didn't think I could do it. As years went on, both my boys were in school.

 

My oldest always struggled with math. I do, too, so I pushed him but didn't make it a huge deal that he wasn't so good at it. He would bring home D's, and I would let him know they were unacceptable and work with him to bring them back up. But a D was the lowest he'd ever brought home. Until 5th grade when he brought home an F. I scheduled a conference with the teacher, to find out what was going on, because he'd never had that low a grade before. The teacher was unable to explain it to me - her exact words were "I don't know why his grade is that low." Add to that, as she was going through the paperwork, trying to find an answer, she kept flipping past things for social studies, geography, history, and saying they hadn't had a chance to work on it yet. And this was in late October, when school had started in August! That was when I began to seriously consider the idea of homeschooling.

 

Then, my youngest had ended up with the lenses popped out of his glasses, and someone stole them from his backpack. The principal said he was lying. That alone pissed me off, but then the kid who stole them returned them and admitted that he'd stolen them. The principal refused to apologize to my son or admit that my son had not been lying. I wanted to pull my kids right then, but my oldest had joined chorus and really didn't want to give it up. It went through December, so I agreed he could stay to finish chorus and we'd see how things were going.

 

From that point forward, my youngest was constantly "in trouble." This was a kid who is not perfect, by any means, but had never - not once - been in trouble at school before. And the administration really crossed the line when it got close to Christmas break, and his "bad behavior" had them telling him he wouldn't go to the Christmas party. He was so upset that he was in tears over this, and they kept telling me that he "just misunderstood." They bullied him and totally ruined his last two to three weeks in school.

 

I pulled them at Christmas break. That was almost three years ago, and we've never looked back. They both love being homeschooled, and do not miss a single thing about public school. Having seen the further decline of our local school district in the intervening years, in every possible way (including the jerk principal now being in a position of authority over all the schools), I have absolutely no regrets either. I feel I'm providing my kids with a healthier environment, a better education, and much more love and affection than they could have received at school. I'm able to tailor their learning to the ways that they learn, so that they actually learn. They have ADHD, so I can work with that rather than being forced to medicate them in order to force them to pay attention and learn.

 

It just works better for us.

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#12 of 28 Old 09-25-2013, 07:03 PM
 
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We used a move for DH's career as the catalyst for homeschooling at the time our children were 8 and just turned 5. Our 8 yr old was at the start of 3rd grade but working at a 4-5th grade level on most of her school work. That was over 3 yrs ago and we just started our 4th yr of homeschooling. We wanted to provide our children to pursue their interests. Work at their level be that above grade level or below grade level.  We live in a medium size city with a large homeschooling community. Our kids take part in an ALE (alternative learning experience) which is a partnership with our state (Washington) we have also homeschooled independently.

 

As for peers my girls have a wide circle of friends, yes most are also homeschooled though not all. One of my children is very extroverted and out going my other child is introverted though not shy and is also outgoing, she just prefers a smaller group of true friends vs a slew of acquaintances Currently my kids are involved in the following.

 

Oldest age 11.

2x a week writing workshop (Institute for Excellence in Writing) 3 hours total.

2x a week math application workshop (lots of hands on math as it relates to science and technology) 3 hours total

2x a week STEAM workshop (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) 3 hours total

1 hour a week Earth Science workshop

1 hour a week Sculpture Class

2 hour a week Claymation workshop

3 hour a week science co-op that we do with 3 other families

Track Practice 2x a week (3 hours)

Girl Scouts

Church

 

Youngest age 8 (next week)

1 hour a week Choir

1 hour a week Art Class

1 hour a week Lego robotics class

1 hour a week zumba

Soccer (4 hours or so a week)

Girl Scouts

Church.

 

Plus the girls hang out with friends in the neighborhood, we do park meet ups, playdates, sleep overs etc. Truthfully my kids have more of a social life as homeschoolers than my oldest did as a public school student.

 

We have an eclectic approach to homeschooling.


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#13 of 28 Old 09-29-2013, 02:35 PM
 
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My husband and I are homeschooling because I just absolutely knew in my heart that this was the path for my oldest son. Over the years, I've added many other reasons to keep homeschooling. Each of my children has a slightly different advantage that they receive from homeschooling: my oldest is sensitive, motivated, and loves to have lots of time to do projects. My youngest is a gentle giant, a sweetheart, who would be lost in the chaos of a large classroom.

 

My youngest and I are very, very social. Homeschooling affords incredible opportunities for friendships and interaction. It's one of the big reasons why I wouldn't even consider giving it up.

 

Can you spend some time with a few homeschooling families in your area? I'd be happy to have you come and play and see what it's really like for a day.

 

peace,

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#14 of 28 Old 10-28-2013, 04:58 PM
 
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Originally Posted by MaryJo View Post
 

I actually don't believe a child should be home schooled. It has some good points, but basically I believe that kids should spend time with other kids.

 

Clearly you have no idea what homeschooling actually looks like. You might want to educate yourself on the subject before making judgemental statements (on a forum for homeschoolers, no less). 

 

Your ignorance about the social lives of homeschoolers, given the massive amount of information on this forum (not to mention the rest of the Internet) that has blown that myth out of the water, is not only worthy of a giant face-palm but perhaps also a sad reflection on your own education.  

 

I'll ignore the other ancient stereotypes you're clinging to, such as: kids cannot learn without a trained professional (it's a wonder our species ever made it this far!) or that educating a child takes up hours of time a day.


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#15 of 28 Old 10-28-2013, 05:05 PM
 
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perhaps also a sad reflection on your own education.  

 

Yes, it brings to mind the argument I've heard before and chuckled over for its back-handed wisdom: Why would you send your kids to school to be educated by the very system that failed you?

 

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#16 of 28 Old 10-28-2013, 05:19 PM
 
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Well, that spam was better concealed than most, I suppose. I hardly ever see complete paragraphs.
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#17 of 28 Old 10-30-2013, 07:52 AM
 
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I decided to homeschool before I ever even became a mother, after working with a large group of teenagers in my church that included a smaller sub-set who were homeschooled. Before I knew that they were homeschooled, I noticed that these kids seemed uncommonly comfortable in their own skin--they were calm, centered, and happy. Not only did they have good friendships in the wider group, but they were also comfortable chatting with a variety of adults in the church, younger kids, etc. And while they had those good friendships with peers, they didn't seem dependent on their peers' estimations of them for their own self-worth. They also all had voracious intellects and could talk easily and at length about their academic interests--for them, learning was one of the central joys in life rather than an unpleasant grind.

 

Previous to getting to know these kids, I thought of homeschooling as an overly idealistic and socially limiting thing to do. Experience with real life homeschoolers taught me differently. Today I have a liberally homeschooled 9 year old who is... calm, centered, happy, socially comfortable with people of all ages, and enthusiastic about his academic interests! I have found that you don't have to be an expert in a subject to help your child learn about it--just keen and willing. You can learn together.

 

The only thing I don't like about homeschooling is dealing with uneducated, judgemental nitwits who assume that they way most people do things MUST be the right way and ask inappropriately personal questions about learning ability, socialization, etc.  I also get a lot of, "Oh, I could never have the patience to homeschool! It's so much work!" I always say, and honestly believe, that it is quite a bit easier to homeschool than to do the work of making my child up in the morning before he's ready to get up,  make him to go to school, force him to do his homework, juggle all the scheduling and requirements of school, deal with bullying, etc...  

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#18 of 28 Old 10-30-2013, 10:49 PM
 
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I decided to homeschool before I ever even became a mother, after working with a large group of teenagers in my church that included a smaller sub-set who were homeschooled. Before I knew that they were homeschooled, I noticed that these kids seemed uncommonly comfortable in their own skin--they were calm, centered, and happy. Not only did they have good friendships in the wider group, but they were also comfortable chatting with a variety of adults in the church, younger kids, etc. And while they had those good friendships with peers, they didn't seem dependent on their peers' estimations of them for their own self-worth. They also all had voracious intellects and could talk easily and at length about their academic interests--for them, learning was one of the central joys in life rather than an unpleasant grind.

 

Previous to getting to know these kids, I thought of homeschooling as an overly idealistic and socially limiting thing to do. Experience with real life homeschoolers taught me differently. Today I have a liberally homeschooled 9 year old who is... calm, centered, happy, socially comfortable with people of all ages, and enthusiastic about his academic interests! I have found that you don't have to be an expert in a subject to help your child learn about it--just keen and willing. You can learn together.

 

The only thing I don't like about homeschooling is dealing with uneducated, judgemental nitwits who assume that they way most people do things MUST be the right way and ask inappropriately personal questions about learning ability, socialization, etc.  I also get a lot of, "Oh, I could never have the patience to homeschool! It's so much work!" I always say, and honestly believe, that it is quite a bit easier to homeschool than to do the work of making my child up in the morning before he's ready to get up,  make him to go to school, force him to do his homework, juggle all the scheduling and requirements of school, deal with bullying, etc...  

Very well said! I really notice that too now, how the kids in our homeschool group get along with kids and adults of all ages, and are comfortable in their own skin, like you said. They are ok being the person they are, and don't feel the constant need to "fit in", be just like everyone else around them. That's one thing that I see changing in my daughter (age 9) a little bit already, now that she's at public school. (the reason why she's at school is a whole different, and long story, so I'll save it). My son (age 8) really does still show that calm, self-confident easily getting along with others attitude. He knows not to talk with strangers unless mommy or daddy are with him, but when we are, he can start up a conversations with anyone! 

 

As far as the other poster, commenting on Hooked on Phonics, I guess that just wasn't the right thing for her kid; I used that program with both of mine, and they both loved it! My daughter was already reading when she started it (she was officially starting Kinder, but I started her in the second half of 1st grade of the program), but my son started the program from the beginning of Kinder level, so he really learned how to read with it, and absolutely loved it! All children are different though, and the freedom and ability to chose what works for each child, and changing if necessary, is what I love about homeschooling.

 

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#19 of 28 Old 10-31-2013, 06:15 AM
 
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Um, my post got deleted I think??? I guess I will have to repost what I had said that was relevant to the OP...

 

What do you believe is the point of socialization? For us it is to ensure that our children can communicate with all kinds of people and they do this on a regular basis at church, the grocery store, with the neighbors, helping out in our businesses, going to the bank, going to medical appointments, visiting with grandparents, playing with their cousins, going to the playground, etc...

 

We chose to homeschool for a lot of reasons, including religious beliefs, the idea that children are individuals who needs individualized learning methods and time to explore their own interests, not wanting them to become peer dependent, having freedom to make family plans whenever we need to without having to pull them out of school, and probably a hundred other things.

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#20 of 28 Old 10-31-2013, 12:21 PM
 
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Off topic but I can't stay quiet...

Regarding phonics. It isn't for everyone and it isn't the only to teach reading. It works for some not others. It does not make sense to me. Although I was able to read at a higher level than most in my class, I failed phonics every year. My son and I use the worksheets for critical thinking..."what do they want to know now"

Regarding socialization.
After seeing my 5 yr old son ask an 11 or 12 year old to play with younger ones (the kinders were too afraid) on a playground after school let out I feel better about it. And this summer my son pulled his weight on a conversation about pre revolutionary war america by knowing more (and informing comfortably) than the other adults about Sam adams...and quoting Longfellow's poem on Paul Revere. I don't think he understood everything that said but he was right there and visible.
So he doesn't know what the trendy toys or sneakers are...and he doesn't play all day exclusively with 5 year olds...but he can talk comfortably to anyone with a style and grace all his own and if that isn't well socialized well, I don't know what.

Regarding the negative comments towards homeschooling.
It is important to understand the need for tolerance and "cultural" differences...especially while posting. Homeschooling is a lifestyle choice...which, like all lifestyle choices, is not best for everyone....however, because it is not right for you does not invalidate it.
For example (perhaps a bad one), I don't understand squat toilets. I am confused by using them and don't understand how they are more hygienic. However, squat toilets are healthier and users, statistically, have fewer incidences of colon problems (among other ailements). Tolerance allowed me to learn this, respect those that use them, and still be comfortable with my decision to use a Western toilet. Yes?

Okay. I'm done. Off to get ready to help my kids beg for candy door to door in the rain...

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#21 of 28 Old 10-31-2013, 04:24 PM
 
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Originally Posted by moominmamma View Post
 

Yes, it brings to mind the argument I've heard before and chuckled over for its back-handed wisdom: Why would you send your kids to school to be educated by the very system that failed you?

 

Miranda

Because homeschoolers are weird.  And the system doesn't matter as long as kids are with other kids so they don't get weird. Or are incapable of working a normal job because they can't take orders.  Doing what you hate doing is the single most important skill one can learn.  Besides being with other kids.  That is the most important.  And prom.  Prom is important, too.  I'd say that's third.  

 

All I can say is that I would probably be an axe murderer had it not been for school.  A weird axe murderer.  

 

:laugh 


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#22 of 28 Old 10-31-2013, 07:49 PM
 
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All I can say is that I would probably be an axe murderer had it not been for school.  A weird axe murderer.  

 

:laugh 

:rotflmao:rotflmao:rotflmaoLOVE this response!


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#23 of 28 Old 11-04-2013, 11:35 AM
 
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There are a lot of reasons....but I'll try to list the big ones.

1# - I was homeschooled myself. This is normal to me and I enjoyed it...so why not?

2# - Freedom. I do not want our family to be a slave to the school's schedule and curriculum. I want my kids to get up when they are rested, learn about what they are interested in, and be able to go on vacation when we WANT to...not when there is a break in the school-year.

3# - Socialization. I do not think what goes on in schools is a healthy social experience. I want my kids to actually have time to play for hours and hours with their friends rather than 20 minutes in the afternoon IF the weather is decent. I also want them to be able to spend time with people of all ages instead of just kids close in age to themselves. I also do not want my children to feel that they have to be interested in what everyone else likes in order to fit in.....or to learn that being older makes you better and our age is a tool to put someone else down if they happen to be younger.

4# - Quality of education. Schools aren't doing so well...everyone knows it, and all the reforming and money in the world hasn't managed to fix it....so we'll just do it ourselves.
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#24 of 28 Old 11-04-2013, 12:27 PM
 
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can't get my head round this prom thing. We don't have proms. Well we do but they are something VERY different. Why is it such a big deal? Presumably HS'd kids can still go to the prom as an invitee, and presumably HSers can throw their own proms? So why the big deal?


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#25 of 28 Old 11-04-2013, 01:34 PM
 
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I think there are some hs proms, my kids aren't that old yet, though personally I had zero interest in it myself. I quit public school two years early to get a g.e.d and start college and my friend's mom was all like 'but what about the prom?' But the boys I was hanging out with weren't gonna ever go.

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#26 of 28 Old 11-06-2013, 07:52 AM
 
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In some ways the "prom" thing is actually a fairly astute concern, because what makes prom a big deal in high school is the whole high school social experience-- there are homeschool proms, but they will never be PROM , they're just a dance and an excuse to get dressed up. Homeschooled teens generally have a very different social life from the one they'd have if they were in school-- try to watch Breakfast Club with them, they won't get it!

 

Personally, I think the same things that make prom such a big deal also make it hard for teens to have a healthy perspective on other things, and so knocking it off its pedestal is ok by me. But I understand people being panicked at first about their kid having a childhood that is in many ways quite different from their own, and worrying about the good things they may miss out on.

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#27 of 28 Old 11-06-2013, 08:52 AM
 
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The school experience seemed more about indoctrinating the kids to whatever the current prevailing ideas are than academics.

Often in classes critical thinking is a buzzword, not a skill actually taught or encouraged.

With large class sizes more time was spent bribing and cajoling them into being quiet and co-operating than academics or free play.

It's exhausting to be away from home all day.

If the child doesn't match the average speed of learning in every subject their learning can't be tailored to their needs.

If the students don't match the learning style they choose to use they're out of luck too.

Moving from one place to another would have meant a lot of worry and work about changing schools, whether the school was a good one, paperwork, stress.

 

At home we use a few workbooks and gently push their individual limits academically. We don't have to leave home every day, and have so much free time to play, exercise, draw, read and write and anything else. When they have questions and teachable moments I am there to give our family's viewpoint, not the teacher's, the policy's, the curriculum's, or the tv network's. Our values and beliefs do not always match what the current PC line is. There are some things I might not know how to teach, that's where you buy the most comprehensive curriculum and the teacher guide and learn along with them. For example, early reading I had no idea how to approach, I learned at age 3 and don't remember how I learned, that's for sure. Another example, I want the give them a basic foundation in Latin - I've always wanted to learn some but haven't yet - should be easy enough alongside my oldest with a curriculum made for elementary kids.

 

My kids play with neighbors and church friends. In middle or high I might send them to private school. We'll send them to public for sports and music before then if they want.

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#28 of 28 Old 11-23-2013, 09:49 AM
 
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I'm a former public school teacher and it seems they are taking creativity away from the students, forcing then into a one way mode of learning, and I could not stand teaching to the test. I teach at home because I like doing an arts and nature based curic which suits my daughter well.
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