But my kids *like* public school. - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

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#31 of 37 Old 12-02-2013, 07:54 PM
 
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Originally Posted by chilliepepper View Post
 

 I want to have my ducks in a row. And "mom, can you play with me" makes me stop doing those things. It threatens the ducks. 

:laugh

 

I'm not one to advise much regarding ducks.  I tend to live and let live until I decide that the floor really isn't underutilized storage space and I clean and organize like a pro (which, actually, I am.)

 

I think you would really enjoy Project Based Homeschooling while you are looking into homeschooling.  Lori Pickert definitely has it together, and is great at encouraging parents and caregivers to let children explore.  Part of what she recommends is that you schedule in project time.  This is great for someone like me who tends to not want to schedule anything, makes me tighten things up and commit, and it's also great for folks like you who like tidy ducks to schedule time to let your hair down and commit to some child-led contained chaos (complete with clean-up time).  

 

With a 2yo, you plan for the unplanned.  You bring plastic bags for wet clothes, a fresh change of clothes, you arrange for extra time to do these things.  It's part of the whole process.

 

And I have no idea where people get the idea that ducks can ever be associated with tidiness.  They are invariably the stinkiest, messiest, loudest, most chaotic animals on the farm.  


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#32 of 37 Old 12-03-2013, 01:19 AM
 
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chilliepepper I'm not quite sure how to articulate this but I'll give it a go. Some of the things you mention-the camera for example. I think some people have these kids who can take cameras to the river and it all be fine, or who can stand on a chair and wash up. Some of my three kids have sometimes been like this. But I'd say, on the whole, I wouldn't developmentally expect a 2 yo to ""Go to the creek with nets and magnifying glasses and a camera..." and low level chaos not to ensue. 

 

Here's a secret. I now have three kids who love arts and crafts. DIY.org is bankrupting me, and I've had to impose some quality control for photos uploaded else their badge earning gets ridiculous. In about half an hour my girls (8 and rising 6) are going to surface, head downstairs, and pull, at a guess, watercolours, ink, scissors and paper from the dresser and make something while eating breakfast. Or it might be pompoms (yarn bombing is big here right now). Ds (10) spends a lot of time on claymation and sewing with a machine right now. I'd say crafts are probably their biggest thing, and we are a family that does a lot of things. The other thing they love is cooking and all three can fend for themselves in the kitchen, while my 8 yo is going through that extreme baking phase that preteens often tend to do. 

 

Here's why I mention this. When they were little, I did very little crafts with them. Very little. I had three kids each around 2 years apart, all three of mine were extremely high needs babies and I literally had to brace myself for the screaming a lot of the time when moving them from the sling to being breastfed. Getting everyone dressed was a serious struggle. I did cook with the older ones but I had to have another adult in the house.to hold the baby. We spent most of our time in coffee shops because that's where my babies slept best, up to around 18 months (I think they just liked the low level talking that's hard to replicate at home. The one thing, I suppose, is that I have always done a lot of crafts-but tbh, a lot of this was done out of the house, with friends, in the evenings. 

 

What happened was that as my kids got older, they got interested in stuff, and I was able to facilitate it, or call on friends who knew more to facilitate, I truly don't think not having that early exposure to pasta shapes and finger painting made a lot of difference at all. 

 

I think there are some really great ideas on this thread. I'm deffo going to revisit the styrofoam (pizza or meat bases! I don't actually think you can buy it) and water - based inks (cheap acrylics, I'm guessing, or I've had some success mixing pva with powder paint). But I wouldn't have had any success doing them with my kids at 2, even though now, at 5, 8 and 10, they are quite into this stuff. At 2, there would have been ten minutes of fun followed by an hour of clean up, with a colicky baby having their needs not met. Far better just to go out for a walk or go to the coffee shop and read 83 more books. Anyway, it hasn't obviously stunted them.

 

I also think, kids get so much more out of an activity when its at the right level for them. I think you go on some mummy-blogs and you think every other 3 year old is handcarving rubber stamps and printing their grandmas wrapping paper. Well, mine weren't. But now they are and its great because it really is them doing it. And also, generally, cleaning up after (though bigger kids just aren't that messy with art)

 

I'm a big fan of doing what you can with what you have. And if what you have is an aversion to mess then I'd try it, give that, and see where you end up.

 


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#33 of 37 Old 12-04-2013, 04:02 AM
 
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About video games, we only limit games in that my son can't play before school and until we are done with school for the day.  He can play/watch as much as he wants in his free time. 


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#34 of 37 Old 12-04-2013, 06:51 AM
 
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My overall impression is that as much as you like the idea of homeschooling, your kids love school, you love the personal benefits of them going to school.  It's going to have to be a massive curriculum to stop that train.  I'm not saying it's insurmountable, not by a long shot, but it would take serious dedication on your part to embrace the entirety of it.  It's going to have to be a powerful motivator.


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#35 of 37 Old 12-04-2013, 09:09 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Fillyjonk View PostI also think, kids get so much more out of an activity when its at the right level for them. I think you go on some mummy-blogs and you think every other 3 year old is handcarving rubber stamps and printing their grandmas wrapping paper. Well, mine weren't. But now they are and its great because it really is them doing it. And also, generally, cleaning up after (though bigger kids just aren't that messy with art)

Many of those blogs look like parent set everything up, did the project, and took her child's photo next to it real quick before letting the child engage in it... And they don't always let you know that the parent spent 2 hours getting ready, the child engaged with it for 5-10 minutes, and then the parent had an hour of clean-up. I generally didn't do projects with my ds because he wanted me to interact with him instead of taking time to prepare projects. I am artistic so I would have loved doing crafts with him. But I had enough experience with 3 yos to know that they are very much in the process stage and that I needed to set aside the idea of there being a goal. Frequently, the only time a 3 yo comes away with a "done" piece is because it was confiscated (swapped out and saved by the parent or teacher) before the child destroyed it in his exploration of the process. Just having materials to explore is enough for most young kids. 

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#36 of 37 Old 12-04-2013, 10:32 AM
 
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Originally Posted by 4evermom View Post
 

Many of those blogs look like parent set everything up, did the project, and took her child's photo next to it real quick before letting the child engage in it... And they don't always let you know that the parent spent 2 hours getting ready, the child engaged with it for 5-10 minutes, and then the parent had an hour of clean-up. I generally didn't do projects with my ds because he wanted me to interact with him instead of taking time to prepare projects. I am artistic so I would have loved doing crafts with him. But I had enough experience with 3 yos to know that they are very much in the process stage and that I needed to set aside the idea of there being a goal. Frequently, the only time a 3 yo comes away with a "done" piece is because it was confiscated (swapped out and saved by the parent or teacher) before the child destroyed it in his exploration of the process. Just having materials to explore is enough for most young kids. 

:rotflmao

 

so, so true. 


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#37 of 37 Old 12-06-2013, 10:45 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by SweetSilver View Post
 

My overall impression is that as much as you like the idea of homeschooling, your kids love school, you love the personal benefits of them going to school.  It's going to have to be a massive curriculum to stop that train.  I'm not saying it's insurmountable, not by a long shot, but it would take serious dedication on your part to embrace the entirety of it.  It's going to have to be a powerful motivator.

You may be right. In fact, you are probably right. There is a part of me that WANTS it to come to that, because of the windows you ladies have given me into your worlds---and for that I thank you. But yep, serious dedication, no doubt. When I think of NEVER having the quiet hours of my day that I'm enjoying right now, I wonder how I would remain sane. Still---I'm haunted by the words of a homeschooling friend who posted in a parallel discussion on my Facebook page: "as parents we will go to extremes to do what is best four our children."

 

Hmmmmmmmm.

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