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#1 of 15 Old 03-28-2014, 01:11 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Hi there!

I am overwhelmed by the amount of reading necessary in order to understand Charlotte Mason's philosophy enough to apply it properly...

Has anyone got knowledge of the books available and which one I should get that explains her teachings Ina more modern way?
Would it still be best to work through her original Volumes?

All comments would be helpful, thanks!
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#2 of 15 Old 03-28-2014, 05:40 PM
 
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IMO, you should read and understand it all if you plan to develop and market a curriculum and call it CM-based. But for teaching your own kids, especially with guidance of a program that someone else developed, I really wouldn't sweat it. Read several overviews (websites or modern-day language books), and get the general idea. Adapt as needed to fit your family. There isn't a magic formula - adhering perfectly to CM's original philosophies and theories does not ensure perfect results, nor does implementing it imperfectly mean your kids won't get a good education.


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#3 of 15 Old 03-29-2014, 06:15 AM
 
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More Charlotte Mason education : a home schooling how-to manual  by Catherine Levison

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#4 of 15 Old 03-31-2014, 01:49 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Thank Ocelotmom, what you say is very valid and I agree.
Would still like to read up a decent condensed version though. Should read her own volumes, but will not realistically get round to doing it in the near future!
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#5 of 15 Old 03-31-2014, 01:52 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks Mapleleaf
I will look into Levinson's 'More Charlotte Mason'. Some people seem to think it more applicable to high school, whereas the first 'Charlotte Mason Education' is more appropriate for younger children?
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#6 of 15 Old 03-31-2014, 01:59 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Some people rave about Karen Andreola's 'Charlotte Mason Companion', others about Catherine Levinson's CM books. Whichever way, I can't find it where I live and will have to order either one from UK or USA and wait and see...
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#7 of 15 Old 04-01-2014, 10:08 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by m-mariette View Post

Thank Ocelotmom, what you say is very valid and I agree.
Would still like to read up a decent condensed version though. Should read her own volumes, but will not realistically get round to doing it in the near future!

I didn't mean my response to be dismissive of a desire to read more about it, so I hope it didn't come across that way. I've just seen too much from people saying you can't TRULY do CM education unless you read and study all 11 volumes, preferably the originals in the original language as anything else is being filtered through someone else's interpretation, which makes it not CM anymore. And how is that helpful for someone who is just looking for somewhere to start with their 1st grader?

 

I haven't read any of the condensed versions myself, so I can't really suggest anything there.


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#8 of 15 Old 04-01-2014, 02:13 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Hi Ocelotmom
No, I totally understand and hear your extremely valid point! I tend to agree with you in any case! I'm just curious about CM's principles, but doubt I'll ever follow any rules and regulations to the tee... It will drive me mad trying!
Thanks, m-mariette
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#9 of 15 Old 04-01-2014, 06:56 PM
 
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I loved Karen Andreola's books on a Charlotte Mason education.  I never read CMs complete and original works myself but felt that Andreola did a beautiful job in her books and I found them very enjoyable to read.

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#10 of 15 Old 04-02-2014, 06:44 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Hi sstripp2020
Thanks, I'm trying to get hold of the book where we live. Easier said than done!
Looking forward to reading it though!
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#11 of 15 Old 04-02-2014, 10:46 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by m-mariette View Post

Thanks Mapleleaf
I will look into Levinson's 'More Charlotte Mason'. Some people seem to think it more applicable to high school, whereas the first 'Charlotte Mason Education' is more appropriate for younger children?

Sorry, I meant the first book...

Charlotte Mason education : a home schooling how-to manual / Catherine Levison

I copy and pasted the wrong wrong one!

 

I also could not read the whole of the original book, but I did find it some of it interesting.  With everything, you take what pertains to your life.  I don't know if I am unusual, being an unschooler and a fan of Charlotte Mason.  I see people put Charlotte Masoninto practice and it is nothing that I would personally do.  I guess I more appreciate much of the theory than the actual schooling part.

 

I admire the fact that she put much emphasis on a child's environment.  She states that children should spend time outdoors everyday, young ages science should be taught by doing, exploring, spending time in nature.  In her original books she mentions that the window in a child's room should be left slightly open, which makes sense considering how they heated the buildings in England during that time period, there would not be much good air indoors.  She considered all aspects of a child's life, their whole life, not just the school work or the school classroom time.

 

She advocates a liberal education, which to me interprets that all subjects are equally important.  She believed in a child's love for learning, and to be careful not to take it away.  She thought children should be treated like persons, speak to them like a person...so many adults speak differently to children than they would another adult, drives me crazy! lol

 

She talked about laying good habits for life.  There is an old saying which she used, I can't remember right now....maybe it will come to me.

 

I really liked her emphasis on "whole books" and "living books".  She thought children should be lead to self education through the contact with the best books, and adults should "stay out of the way" by not lecturing.  Her method relies heavily on narration instead of comprehension questions or workbooks to varify knowledge...and that makes total sense to me.   She believed text books to be a list of dry facts and nt very useful for learning.  Children should read about people, characters with lives and feelings; she said "children should be taught by the humanities".  

 

I also liked some aspects of her approach to the school part.  She said children don't really need to start any formal lessons until the age of 7 (or was it 9?)  Classes should be short morning lesson with a large variety of subjects and have all afternoon and evening to enjoy being a child, pursue hobbies, read.  And starting out the subject lessons themselves are short, 20 min.

 

Her motto back then makes perfect sense today "Education is an atmosphere, a discipline, a life".  So many people think an education is something you get when you are in a building.....sigh.

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#12 of 15 Old 04-02-2014, 08:32 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mapleleaf View Post

Sorry, I meant the first book...
Charlotte Mason
 education : a home schooling how-to manual / Catherine Levison

I copy and pasted the wrong wrong one!

I also could not read the whole of the original book, but I did find it some of it interesting.  With everything, you take what pertains to your life.  I don't know if I am unusual, being an unschooler and a fan of Charlotte Mason.  I see people put Charlotte Masoninto practice and it is nothing that I would personally do.  I guess I more appreciate much of the theory than the actual schooling part.

I admire the fact that she put much emphasis on a child's environment.  She states that children should spend time outdoors everyday, young ages science should be taught by doing, exploring, spending time in nature.  In her original books she mentions that the window in a child's room should be left slightly open, which makes sense considering how they heated the buildings in England during that time period, there would not be much good air indoors.  She considered all aspects of a child's life, their whole life, not just the school work or the school classroom time.

She advocates a liberal education, which to me interprets that all subjects are equally important.  She believed in a child's love for learning, and to be careful not to take it away.  She thought children should be treated like persons, speak to them like a person...so many adults speak differently to children than they would another adult, drives me crazy! lol

She talked about laying good habits for life.  There is an old saying which she used, I can't remember right now....maybe it will come to me.

I really liked her emphasis on "whole books" and "living books".  She thought children should be lead to self education through the contact with the best books, and adults should "stay out of the way" by not lecturing.  Her method relies heavily on narration instead of comprehension questions or workbooks to varify knowledge...and that makes total sense to me.   She believed text books to be a list of dry facts and nt very useful for learning.  Children should read about people, characters with lives and feelings; she said "children should be taught by the humanities".  

I also liked some aspects of her approach to the school part.  She said children don't really need to start any formal lessons until the age of 7 (or was it 9?)  Classes should be short morning lesson with a large variety of subjects and have all afternoon and evening to enjoy being a child, pursue hobbies, read.  And starting out the subject lessons themselves are short, 20 min.

Her motto back then makes p
erfect sense today "Education is an atmosphere, a discipline, a life".  So many people think an education is something you get when you are in a building.....sigh.

Hi Mapleleaf

I thought you might've done. Not a problem!
Someone else,somewhere else, mentioned the first one more appropriate for younger children and the second for high school kids?
I appreciate your comment!

Kind regards
Mariette
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#13 of 15 Old 04-15-2014, 06:50 PM
 
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Andreola's book is pretty florid, but it's a fun read. I'm going to tackle Levinson's and then gradually and incrementally read Mason's original works. On the surface, this philosophy intrigued me, and I still intend to give it a whirl. But all of the stuff that I need to learn about it-before plunging headlong into homeschooling all of my kids next August--just seems daunting!

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#14 of 15 Old 04-17-2014, 07:08 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Hi Turquesa

I know the feeling! I've also just started homeschooling (just recently received Core B of Sonlight) and I think my worst enemy is what I read or think I should be doing beforehand than just doing it!
I still haven't received one of the CM books, because I have to wait patiently for the parcel to arrive. However, without even knowing any of the detailed points Charlotte Mason was trying to make, it seems like such a real education in any case! It touches all the material that makes one an interesting and wholesome person!

Good luck with the homeschooling!
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#15 of 15 Old 04-25-2014, 09:11 AM
 
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I haven't read any of her books yet and I'm not sure if I will unless I happen to find them at the local library but I like the layout and look of her curriculum style. I've looked over quite a few websites on CM and adapted it to fit us. We use aspects from quite a few different styles though just depending on what fits each child and subject. We're just getting back into homeschooling after a year in ps and for us the biggest CM part will be the nature study although I will be adding other things in with it for science. We will do some of the artist study and music study also but the rest of our curriculum is different. We use Math U See for math and are doing a custom made history curriculum based on genealogy. I think for homeschooling you would be fine looking over the websites and understanding her program enough to implement it. amblesideonline and simplecm are two that I really liked. Also look at the pennygardner site and she has a TON of other links to browse through.


Michelle mom to DD , DS , & lil DD plus and spending my days
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