Do you give grades to your middle/ high schoolers? - Mothering Forums

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Old 05-04-2014, 06:49 PM - Thread Starter
 
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and if so, do you give grades for everything, or just certain things?  Do you issue report cards?  Do you give rewards for good grades?

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Old 05-04-2014, 07:51 PM
 
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No grades here for my 12 yo; if she gets an answer wrong we go over it and discuss. If she still doesn't get it we tell her the 'right' answer....grades don't really apply to us. smile.gif Her 5 yo sister, however, loves getting grades but we don't do any formal instruction until 10 or 11, so this amounts to her doing some math or writing (usually made up herself) and me giving her a letter grade and a smiley face.
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Old 05-05-2014, 12:11 AM
 
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No grades here. Mistakes are an opportunity to learn, to improve mastery. My kids began taking school courses where grades were assigned between age 10 and 15 and not only did they have no trouble performing well in that sort of higher-stakes evaluative format despite having no prior experience with it but they emerged with IMO an extremely healthy attitudes to grades. They like to score well but they never confuse good grades with the real purpose of education, which is of course to learn. That latter purpose always holds primary importance for them and as such they don't suffer from test anxiety.

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Old 05-05-2014, 08:47 AM
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No, we don't really move on until something is mastered.  Well, sometimes we give that topic a break and try again later.  Regardless, grades would have no purpose.  However, there was a time period of a month or two when my oldest was demanding grades.  I took that as an opportunity to go over percents, and then I gave her a grade for a while. 

 

Recently, I had to make a transcript for my oldest.  She will be taking a couple classes next year at the high school.  I gave her an A in everything except Spanish.  I made that a pass/fail grade and she "passed".  I don't speak Spanish and it is hard to assess her skills in that area.  I truly believe she would get good grades, quite possibly all As in a public school and so I think I represented her appropriately. I also had to provide test scores.  She does very well on standardized tests, so I don't think anyone will think I was just "giving" her the 4.0. 

 

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Old 05-05-2014, 10:06 AM
 
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Originally Posted by AAK View Post
 

No, we don't really move on until something is mastered. 

 

This is the crux of it for me. In school the curriculum moves ahead whether an individual child has fully mastered everything so for or not. Grades are a way of documenting the gaps and lags that remain when the class moves ahead. An A means no real gaps or lags, a C means there are significant areas that are not yet fully mastered. 

 

If you're homeschooling, there's no need to move ahead with the rest of the class before something is fully mastered, so there's no need to measure the size of the missing bits.

 

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Old 05-05-2014, 05:12 PM
 
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Yes I would, I think our schooling needs to be standard between all the kids in US.

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Old 05-05-2014, 05:39 PM
 
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Yes I would, I think our schooling needs to be standard between all the kids in US.

 

Good heavens, why? Are you against electives and course choices in high school too? Are you opposed to differentiated teaching for LDs and giftedness? Are you a homeschooling parent?

 

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Old 05-05-2014, 06:26 PM
 
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Be gentle. Sasan could be a new homeschooler or someone looking into it.


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Old 05-05-2014, 07:37 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Sasan View Post
 

Yes I would, I think our schooling needs to be standard between all the kids in US.

 

The push in public schools to use national standard (common core) is raising the number of students on Individual Educational Plans. One size fits all education doesn't work, not even in public schools. 

 

My own 2 children are very, very different from each other. What worked for one, often didn't work for the other. A standard education for the average child wouldn't have worked for either of them. Part of the beauty of homeschooling is tailoring to a child's learning style and interest.

 

Neither of my kids are homeschooling at this time. One took an early college option and the other is on the honors track at our local highschool. They are still making choices about what is right for their education.


but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

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Old 05-05-2014, 07:57 PM
 
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The whole world has a core based schooling and US doesn't stand in a good position in global ranking :( I understand our point of view but I think that part is up to us parents to train our  kids for their education at home and prepare them for their schools

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Old 05-05-2014, 08:14 PM
 
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No I don't think that's true. A number of small relatively culturally homogeneous nations have national curricula, but often with tremendous flexibility in terms of implementation and unprecedented teacher autonomy. Many nations that rate higher than the US on international measures of public education don't have national core curricula. Canada, where I live, is one such example. The evidence I've read all points to socioeconomic inequality as being at the root of problems with American public education.

Re: preparing kids at home for schools. While preparing my kids for successful entry into school wasn't my primary aim (educating them well was my primary aim) our mastery approach without grades and without a standardized curriculum prepared them extremely well. They entered high school at advanced levels and are excelling. Cookie cutter education is neither necessary nor sufficient for excellence.

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Old 05-07-2014, 04:05 AM
 
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For my sixth grader, I do informal grading. Meaning I mainly grade her in Math and Language Arts, not for other subjects. Even for the subjects that I do grade in, I allow her to get a second chance to answer the question correctly. Only if she doesn't find the answer the second time, do I mark her answer as wrong. For other subjects like Science and Social Studies, I just have a answer up to 3 review questions at the end of each chapter within her Sci/SS textbooks and help her go over any questions she might have answered wrongly/incompletely. As for rewards, we usually make it a tradition to reward the kids with a trip to Toys R Us after they successfully complete each school year.


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Old 05-07-2014, 08:12 AM
 
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I don't use grades the way schools do because 1) we teach to mastery, and 2) I simply don't have the breadth of experience to know the difference between A, B & C work the way an experienced teacher does, and so my grades would not be particularly valuable.

 

I may need to put together a transcript at some point that includes grades, and if that happens I will do my best to accurately report my child's achievements, but I don't want grades to be what motivates my kids, so I'm not going to issue grades as a matter of habit. 

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