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Old 06-12-2014, 10:56 PM - Thread Starter
 
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kindergarden!!!!

My baby is 5, will be 6 in march. I want to start homeschooling in August. I have already picked out a math (Saxon) and reading (Burton reading) program, what other subjects do you guys think I should cover for her age????
I'm a newbie!!!!!
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Old 06-13-2014, 03:45 AM
 
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Whatever sounds fun to both of you! At that age (my littlest turns 6 next week) we just read to/with them a lot and do what my 12 yo calls "kitchen math"- weights and measures, temperatures, money, etc. Cooking together, build a birdhouse, figure out how much paint to buy for a project...everyday stuff. Most kids that age love hands on science experiments, from a kit or book or just experimenting on their own.
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Old 06-13-2014, 09:02 AM
 
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I highly recommend board games at this age. Chutes and Ladders (counting to 100), Quirkle (pattern recognition--of but it's so much more!) especially the Quirkle cubes that allow you to roll for another color/shape, Battleship (coordinates), Monopoly or Monopoly Junior (money, addition and subtraction and a little multiplication)-- try the many renditions like Farmopoly or Horseopoly), Yahtzee and/or Kismet....

Of course any game is going to teach logic and strategy (Chess, Labyrinth, etc.)

This is the age we started giving a tiny allowance-- one quarter per year per week, which meant 1.25 for 5 years old. I would also give my girls a percentage if they rolled all the loose change (except quarters, which I do and need for allowance). I give 100% of the value of the pennies, 10% of the value of the nickel and dime rolls.

We also have loved wooden pattern shapes, which we lay out on a yoga mat to make pictures. And wooden Cuisenaire rods. Miquon Math uses those rods in its work books.

The rest of everything we cover through stories and exploration, (and library videos!)

The "formula" works so well, we haven't changed it a bit, even though the girls are 7 and 9.

"Let me see you stripped down to the bone. Let me hear you speaking just for me."
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Old 06-13-2014, 09:34 AM
 
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The best advice I can give new homeschoolers (for kindergarten especially, but for more than that age) is to not get too attached to your chosen curriculum, or materials and toys for that matter. Some kids love the new routine, especially if it means one on one attention. Some don't like it at all. Sometimes there is a mismatch between the curriculum and your child ( or even you!) and at that point you need to let it go, no matter how highly recommended it came from a friend. Remember that kindergarteners would get along just fine without any change in routine at all. Curriculum at this age, I think, has more to do with a parent's peace of mind than any real advantage over non-curriculum ways of learning (and of course, some states make it difficult to work without one).

Common pitfalls at 5-6yo: math workbooks can depend too much on writing, which is still an emerging skill; reading, which was so fun with stories, suddenly becomes work; after acing addition your son suddenly "gets" multiplication but the curriculum (or the parent) isn't flexible enough to skip subtraction for the moment; other subjects lean on reading skills which is still in its infancy for most kids, making history more a reading lesson than a lesson on history. These skills are far more about individual development than any progressive work. Kids have an uncanny way to throw a wrench into the most well-researched educational theories.

So, I'm not recommending No Curriculum At All (though it's worked for me). Curriculum tends to put parents in the mindset of "I paid for this, it was recommended, I can't just set it aside", "the curriculum states this skill is next, I don't feel comfortable skipping it" or worse, "Something's wrong with my kid and/or my ability to homeschool."

I'm just saying, "Be willing to let this go if it's not working". And it doesn't stop with curriculum: that's the case with just about everything with homeschooling at any age.

"Let me see you stripped down to the bone. Let me hear you speaking just for me."
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Old 06-13-2014, 11:31 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SweetSilver View Post
Curriculum tends to put parents in the mindset of ..... "Something's wrong with my kid and/or my ability to homeschool."

I'm just saying, "Be willing to let this go if it's not working". And it doesn't stop with curriculum: that's the case with just about everything with homeschooling at any age.
Such great advice! I totally agree!

Miranda

Mountain mama to two great kids and two great grown-ups
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