I don't think cursive is that important - am I missing something? - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
 8Likes
  • 1 Post By Daffodil
  • 1 Post By my3legacies
  • 1 Post By moominmamma
  • 1 Post By Mylie
  • 1 Post By Linda on the move
  • 1 Post By AAK
  • 1 Post By One_Girl
  • 1 Post By sillysapling
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 22 Old 06-25-2014, 08:47 AM - Thread Starter
 
kcc153's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 41
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
I don't think cursive is that important - am I missing something?

First of all, I apologize if this topic has been discussed to death here in the past, hopefully not...

Anyway, I am thinking that I won't be teaching cursive to my 8 yo, for several reasons. First, she truly struggles with fine motor skills, always has, and learning to write was very difficult for her. In kindergarten (private school) she agonized over the writing practice worksheets, had so much trouble both holding the pencil correctly and forming the letters, homework - what little there was - was just torture. She has improved a great deal and can now write legibly and easily but it's still not her favorite thing. Now I realize that learning cursive would be good fine motor skill practice, but so is playing legos and rainbow loom and other stuff she actually ENJOYS! I just can't imagine, now that she's mastered printing, forcing her back into the endless drill and worksheet routine just to learn a new kind of handwriting that NO ONE USES ANYWAY!!

Which leads me to the second reason...I think it's obsolete. In researching this, it seems like homeschoolers in general are really big on teaching cursive, but it seems like there's no real reason, except that schools are dropping it so it must be important?? It's a "lost art", it teaches discipline (?), we all learned it so they should too...I really don't see one compelling reason here. It seems especially popular with the school-at-home and classical folks, which is not how we roll, but I am starting to second guess myself because no one seems to agree with me. I'm new at this, we just finished our first year homeschooling, so I know I don't know everything! Which brings me to my initial question - am I missing something vital about cursive??

P.S. I do plan to give her exposure to READING stuff written in cursive, because I do think that is important. I also plan to introduce typing this year, which seems like a much better use of our time and is a skill that is essential, I believe. Anyone know of any great typing apps/programs for kids??
kcc153 is offline  
#2 of 22 Old 06-25-2014, 09:21 AM
 
Daffodil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Vermont
Posts: 3,620
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
I think you might be right. But you might find this article from the NY Times interesting:

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/03/sc...ades.html?_r=0
AAK likes this.
Daffodil is online now  
#3 of 22 Old 06-25-2014, 09:51 AM
 
Polliwog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 4,099
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Our schools still teach cursive.
Polliwog is online now  
#4 of 22 Old 06-25-2014, 10:52 AM
 
my3legacies's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 45
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
I am teaching cursive this year, and still think its important. I have to read and write cursive all the time as a nurse. Doctors write all their orders and notes in cursive at my work. Plus, it really bothered me that my kids couldn't read anything in the declaration of independence when we went to D.C. I write in cursive too, and I refuse to dummy up myself just so my kids can read what I write. I refuse to go down to that level.
blessedwithboys likes this.
my3legacies is offline  
#5 of 22 Old 06-25-2014, 01:32 PM
 
moominmamma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: In the middle of nowhere, at the centre of everything.
Posts: 5,766
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 84 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by my3legacies View Post
I am teaching cursive this year, and still think its important. I have to read and write cursive all the time as a nurse. Doctors write all their orders and notes in cursive at my work. Plus, it really bothered me that my kids couldn't read anything in the declaration of independence when we went to D.C. I write in cursive too, and I refuse to dummy up myself just so my kids can read what I write. I refuse to go down to that level.
I taught my kids to read cursive, and it was a piece of cake. It took them less than an hour of practice to get good at it. Learning to write it is, on the other hand, a much slower process. Two of my kids were motivated to learn; two haven't bothered.

My dh and I are both doctors. I write in cursive and he doesn't because if he does, no one can tell what he's written. The nurses begged him to give them verbal orders rather than write, until they discovered that his printing is fine so that's what he does. Our medical records at the family practice clinic are all on the computer and have been for more than a decade, as have the vast majority of clinics in our region. It's only in ER and our nursing homes where things are handwritten, and as I say, printing works just fine.

So I put cursive writing in the same category as, say, playing the piano: it's a worthwhile skill for many who enjoy it, and probably helps develop motor skills and artistic sense, but it's hardly the stuff of necessity.

Miranda
meemee likes this.

Mountain mama to three great kids and one great grown-up

moominmamma is online now  
#6 of 22 Old 06-25-2014, 02:38 PM
 
Mylie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 1,578
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Our Schools still teach it in 3rd grade...I am glad because while technology and progress is great so is good old fashioned writing...that includes the knowledge of being able to write your own signature..

If the Schools here didnt teach it still I would...I think it is important..
blessedwithboys likes this.
Mylie is online now  
#7 of 22 Old 06-25-2014, 04:50 PM
 
Linda on the move's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: basking in the sunshine
Posts: 10,698
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 76 Post(s)
The schools here don't teach it.

We spent a little time on when they kids were young and homeschooling -- not much. One of my DDs has serious fine motor deficits and it was a bit of nightmare. So we worked on it -- may be 6-8 times for 20 minutes each time over the course of 6 months (I'm guessing). Both my kids can read it, and the gifted one with no challenges can write it. She and another former homeschooler at her school joke that it is their secret code.

I think typing, word processing, and file management skills are far important than cursive.

Cursive is kinda nice, and some kids like it. But it sure isn't a hill to die on. It also isn't a big deal for kids with no challenges to learn it, so never let someone intimate to you that you *should* do it with your child with challenges. They really don't know what they are talking about, because they don't understand what is going on with your kid.
meemee likes this.

but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

Linda on the move is online now  
#8 of 22 Old 06-25-2014, 06:01 PM
AAK
 
AAK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Eastern Washington
Posts: 3,089
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by kcc153 View Post
First of all, I apologize if this topic has been discussed to death here in the past, hopefully not...

Anyway, I am thinking that I won't be teaching cursive to my 8 yo, for several reasons. First, she truly struggles with fine motor skills, always has, and learning to write was very difficult for her. In kindergarten (private school) she agonized over the writing practice worksheets, had so much trouble both holding the pencil correctly and forming the letters, homework - what little there was - was just torture. She has improved a great deal and can now write legibly and easily but it's still not her favorite thing. Now I realize that learning cursive would be good fine motor skill practice, but so is playing legos and rainbow loom and other stuff she actually ENJOYS! I just can't imagine, now that she's mastered printing, forcing her back into the endless drill and worksheet routine just to learn a new kind of handwriting that NO ONE USES ANYWAY!!

Which leads me to the second reason...I think it's obsolete. In researching this, it seems like homeschoolers in general are really big on teaching cursive, but it seems like there's no real reason, except that schools are dropping it so it must be important?? It's a "lost art", it teaches discipline (?), we all learned it so they should too...I really don't see one compelling reason here. It seems especially popular with the school-at-home and classical folks, which is not how we roll, but I am starting to second guess myself because no one seems to agree with me. I'm new at this, we just finished our first year homeschooling, so I know I don't know everything! Which brings me to my initial question - am I missing something vital about cursive??

P.S. I do plan to give her exposure to READING stuff written in cursive, because I do think that is important. I also plan to introduce typing this year, which seems like a much better use of our time and is a skill that is essential, I believe. Anyone know of any great typing apps/programs for kids??
Our local schools dropped it and are now picking it back up. It seems that that they believe it directly correlated to the plummeting math scores. There is some indication that the process of cursive (vs print) helps the connections between both hemispheres of the brain.

Regardless, I taught it to my kids. The youngest wanted to learn this past year (second grade) so she did. My oldest kinda learned it in school, but not completely, so we learned it again when we pulled her out. My middle was more of an experiment. . . I had heard that some dyslexic children do better with cursive. Her printing is horrible! Cursive was better for her. We took it slow though.

Amy
rachelsmama likes this.

Mom to three very active girls Anna (14), Kayla (11), Maya (8). 
AAK is online now  
#9 of 22 Old 06-25-2014, 07:14 PM
 
SweetSilver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Westfarthing
Posts: 5,188
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 76 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post

Cursive is kinda nice, and some kids like it. But it sure isn't a hill to die on.
My thoughts, exactly. I even love handwriting and calligraphy and the *art* of the written word. DD9 wants to learn to read and write cursive, and I am encouraging that because, beyond just being something she wants to do, I think will help ease her printing some more. She struggled with holding her pencils and pens, controlling the flow, and well behind the curve for her age. So, I am looking forward to some dabbling in running the pen along, teaching some more intuitive ways of forming letters that what she has come up with.

But, yeah, not a hill to die on.

"Let me see you stripped down to the bone. Let me hear you speaking just for me."
SweetSilver is offline  
#10 of 22 Old 06-25-2014, 09:21 PM
 
One_Girl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 4,735
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 35 Post(s)
I taught dd cursive because it helps with handwriting for many kids who struggle with writing. I never did worksheets but her school did later. I just casually showed her how to form letters while we were waiting for food at a restaurant, had a moment of downtime at home, and when she asked me to. I never used worksheets when I learned because they were too expensive and from the quality of the sheets dd brought home I believe both of us were better off learning a more fluid style of cursive. I'd be careful to avoid worksheets that don't appear to encourage flowing writing. Some, like Handwriting Without Tears, teach a choppy style that makes writing harder.
rachelsmama likes this.
One_Girl is offline  
#11 of 22 Old 06-26-2014, 05:27 AM
 
meemee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Norther California
Posts: 12,786
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
well i will advice to try teaching cursive for a very different reason.

out of all the struggles in your dd's life, is handwriting the easiest struggle? for instance i am seen as a free range mom, not a disciplinarian at all. one of the reasons is because dd already has a very tough life because as coparents we do not have a respectful relationship between the parents. its tough on dd. i dont need to make her life more miserable.

but 'struggle' is an important lesson to learn. and for me handwriting seems like an 'easy' mountain to climb. we started hs in middle school. i would have liked dd to learn cursive, but she picked up a v. arduous way of letter formation which she could never unlearn. so i stayed with her printing, but insisted she write neat and a size easily able to read (she tends to write in size 9 font).

i see the value in her writing. i see the difference when she tries to write. on paper that is. i notice it helps her thoughts. slows them down. when she types she needs a lot of editing. but when she writes - because it slows down her thought process, she makes fewer mistakes.

i make a case for clear, legible handwriting. cursive is nice, but printing is still ok in my books.

what i like about handwriting is how it sets you apart, it can open doors. many instances i have been noticed because of my handwriting (thanks to my dad). its been a foot in the door in many occasions.

i also look at it as an art form. for both dd and me writing with a pen and paper helps us find creative solution rather than using an app or word processing. there is a different emotion when we are typing as opposed to writing. dd can turn in typed reports for her hsing, but she prefers to write (it wasnt that way always).

i struggled with handwriting. i recall i spent a lot of time on it but not in the traditional manner. so it wasnt so much work for me. but i remember that feeling of accomplishment when i finally did get it down i think by 5th or 6th grade if i recall right.

both dd and i are journalers. for a perfectionist like dd, neat handwriting is a zen moment.

looking back, like one girl pointed out, cursive can be very easy to teach. i recall we did a lot of school homework under a tree sitting on a blanket. or on the sandy beach next to the river. the ones dd struggled with. we've done this since she was in K. she runs off and plays and comes back and does some work, then off she goes to play and back for a little work. i did that with subjects she struggles in. some work she prefers sitting at home, concentrating without distractions. but we still do a lot outdoors.

 treehugger.gif Co-parent, joy.gifcold.gifbrand new homeschooling middle schoolerjoy.gif, and an attackcat.gif 
meemee is offline  
#12 of 22 Old 06-26-2014, 12:49 PM - Thread Starter
 
kcc153's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 41
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
I appreciate all the replies - lots of good insight. The NY times article was interesting, especially the part about kids with dyslexia or other processing disorders having an easier time with cursive letter formation. If I had a child with these issues it would definitely be something to try.

I guess I still feel that my initial reasoning for not teaching my particular child holds true. The frustration level I foresee for her is just not worth it to me. The idea of using cursive to purposefully create a difficult situation for her to overcome is a little odd to me, I guess I'm of the mind that life will give all of us enough of these "opportunities" without creating them on purpose!
kcc153 is offline  
#13 of 22 Old 06-26-2014, 07:50 PM
 
moominmamma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: In the middle of nowhere, at the centre of everything.
Posts: 5,766
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 84 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by kcc153 View Post
The idea of using cursive to purposefully create a difficult situation for her to overcome is a little odd to me, I guess I'm of the mind that life will give all of us enough of these "opportunities" without creating them on purpose!
Sometimes opportunities to work through difficult challenges arise naturally. But some kids tend to give up if they can't do something perfectly at the start, and need a little help learning how to stick with things and work through them. And some kids just seem to float through life thanks to being ahead of the curve developmentally and/or intellectually, and find almost everything easy. So I can see the point actively facilitating some kids to grapple with challenge. But in my family, I prefer to use my kids' own goals and desires as the motive force for that challenge. For example I'd rather encourage my musical gymnast kid to tackle a challenging violin piece she loves, or to perfect her back walkovers, instead of setting her a parent-defined challenge like cursive handwriting which she isn't interested in learning.

Miranda

Mountain mama to three great kids and one great grown-up

moominmamma is online now  
#14 of 22 Old 06-27-2014, 10:40 AM
 
meemee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Norther California
Posts: 12,786
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by moominmamma View Post
Sometimes opportunities to work through difficult challenges arise naturally. But some kids tend to give up if they can't do something perfectly at the start, and need a little help learning how to stick with things and work through them. And some kids just seem to float through life thanks to being ahead of the curve developmentally and/or intellectually, and find almost everything easy. So I can see the point actively facilitating some kids to grapple with challenge. But in my family, I prefer to use my kids' own goals and desires as the motive force for that challenge. For example I'd rather encourage my musical gymnast kid to tackle a challenging violin piece she loves, or to perfect her back walkovers, instead of setting her a parent-defined challenge like cursive handwriting which she isn't interested in learning.

Miranda
yup. i've had to give dd challenges. with me right behind her encouraging. that i knew she could do it, that she is capable of it. she flies through life very easily. she has rarely faced any challenges until we started hsing. things were boring and repetitious to her. she has always loved challenges since she was little. i encouraged her to walk across the room as a toddler with a bowl full of milk and cereal across the room. this child has anxiety. she is always afraid she is going to do wrong. high perfectionism. seh was petrified of dropping the bowl and making a mess. and i told her hey no problem i'll clean it up but you can do it. you should have seen the look on her face when she did it.

dunno. dd is a writer. very creative. neat handwriting is a skill she needed to have, it was a challenge she had to overcome. it was right for our family. may not be for yours.

 treehugger.gif Co-parent, joy.gifcold.gifbrand new homeschooling middle schoolerjoy.gif, and an attackcat.gif 
meemee is offline  
#15 of 22 Old 06-27-2014, 04:54 PM
 
moominmamma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: In the middle of nowhere, at the centre of everything.
Posts: 5,766
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 84 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by meemee View Post
dunno. dd is a writer. very creative. neat handwriting is a skill she needed to have, it was a challenge she had to overcome. it was right for our family. may not be for yours.
Maybe we're talking about the same thing: a challenge our kids want to tackle, motivated by their own interests and desires, but which requires a bit of parental facilitation in order to be successful and learn not just the skill, but the habits of persistence and problem-solving. For my kids handwriting was never that skill (even though I have a very gifted and profuse writer)... but I can see how it could definitely work for the right kid with the right motivation.

Miranda

Mountain mama to three great kids and one great grown-up

moominmamma is online now  
#16 of 22 Old 07-01-2014, 09:59 AM
 
smartmama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Florida
Posts: 68
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
I think a certain amount of cursive is important. She'll need to be able to sign her name someday, and that can't be done in print. I don't know that you need to teach her to write everything there is to write in cursive, but I do think helping her learn to sign her name in cursive is important. There are still so many things that we have to sign our names to (driver's licenses, marriage licenses, Social Security cards, just to name a few), and I don't see those things becoming obsolete anytime soon.

But I also don't know that it needs to be taught right now. You could start now, or you could wait until she's a little older. And once you do start it, I don't see any reason why it has to be taught as traditional cursive. If it really presents major issues for her, then just working with her on a way to connect her letters and turn it into a signature as opposed to just her printed name could be enough.

I personally choose to teach my sons cursive, but I also tend to believe that as homeschoolers, we all have to find what works best for our family. Some things are "need to know", regardless of how they're taught, while other things are more optional. We all have to decide how important the options are.
smartmama is offline  
#17 of 22 Old 07-02-2014, 02:52 AM
 
meemee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Norther California
Posts: 12,786
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
What? you need to learn cursive so you can sign your name?

well i can see that for the first 18 years or so of your age. or maybe even less. but afterwards by the time you manage your bank account, etc your 'signature' is completely different. it takes on an art form. as long as you are consistent with your design it matters not what mark you make as proven by Rick Riordan (However i dont know if the author's DL signature matches the ones in books).

with todays advancement in technology i wonder if 50 years from now the title would read - I dont think handwriting is that important..."

 treehugger.gif Co-parent, joy.gifcold.gifbrand new homeschooling middle schoolerjoy.gif, and an attackcat.gif 
meemee is offline  
#18 of 22 Old 07-02-2014, 03:16 AM
 
Daffodil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Vermont
Posts: 3,620
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
There's no legal requirement to use cursive for a signature.
Daffodil is online now  
#19 of 22 Old 07-02-2014, 04:43 AM
 
sillysapling's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 744
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 43 Post(s)
Some people find cursive easier to write. I find cursive easier than print, and my notes tend to be a bit of a mix of the two. She also might find it pretty and have an easier time handling the struggle if she feels the results are more worth it. I don't think you need to force it, but it could be worth introducing the idea- although just teaching her to read it could peak her interest.

Reading it is definitely a necessary skill just because enough people do use it.
rachelsmama likes this.

sillysapling is online now  
#20 of 22 Old 07-02-2014, 09:07 AM
 
SweetSilver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Westfarthing
Posts: 5,188
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 76 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by my3legacies View Post
Plus, it really bothered me that my kids couldn't read anything in the declaration of independence when we went to D.C.
Thankfully, the Declaration of Independence has been reprinted millions of times in plain text. It's not the style of script taught anyhow, and I am constantly correcting myself when my brain wants to read "f" for "s".

Even older script that is still Modern English is even more unintelligible, and once the form of English changes, the letters are even harder to recognize since we have less context (Canterbury Tales).

It's fine and even a little patriotic to read the original Declaration (or facsimiles, since the original can be difficult to see in person, or was when I visited DC) but no more so than reading the Magna Carta, arguably an even more important document in Western politics. Even if that document (documentS, since there were more than one) had been written in Modern English, it would have been difficult to read, the style of the letters is so different.

I happen to love cursive and historical script. I won't go so far as to say it's obsolete, but also not necessary in any context I know of (maybe I need to redefine OBSOLETE here!) An old boyfriend's dad, owner of his own financial investment company and a very successful businessman by any measure, still wrote in block letters, including his signature. He's around 75yo now.

"Let me see you stripped down to the bone. Let me hear you speaking just for me."
SweetSilver is offline  
#21 of 22 Old 07-10-2014, 06:05 PM
 
aim4balance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 148
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Did you ask her? My 8 yr old couldn't wait to start cursive. I asked if he was interested in learning it, I downloaded a free program, and he loved doing it. Just a thought, maybe she would want to, and if in fact its easier for her, maybe it will shed a more positive light on her writing experience.

You asked for a typing pgm suggestion, my boys liked this online, free starter course this past spring--http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/typing/.
aim4balance is offline  
#22 of 22 Old 07-16-2014, 11:36 PM
 
crazyms's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Way down south
Posts: 1,187
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 71 Post(s)
My dd was one that wanted to learn cursive so we're teaching it. DS isn't so interested and actually just seemed annoyed that he'd learned print and now finds out there's another handwriting he might need to learn. I am teaching it to dd and ds sees us do it but I don't do any real teaching of it to him. The worksheets I print for dd to practice (because she likes worksheets) I print him a copy of and put in his extra work/time filler book for when we aren't doing much or I'm busy with dd. He's played with the worksheets and done some cursive on his own just because it was there and he wanted something to do I guess. He's actually learning it quite well on his own even though I'm not formally teaching it to him. I think this is sufficient.

I will say though if you would like to teach and are worried about her being stressed with fine motor skills using a pen or pencil to do it try some alternative ways of learning. Things like drawing cursive letters in sand or tracing a letter out on top of a ziploc bag filled with something like shaving cream can be fun for kids and still help her learn the letters. Maybe a technique like that would allow you to teach it without stressing her much. She might find that fun and then could put those skills to use on paper once she's comfortable with them.

I have chosen to teach it and I personally find it a valuable skill to still learn but agree with others above it isn't a hill to die on or an absolute necessity in my book. If you really think it's best not to teach it then don't. Your dd will be fine either way and only you know what's best for your individual child's needs.

Michelle mom to DD , DS , & lil DD plus and spending my days
crazyms is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off