Leaning towards homeschooling... - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 5 Old 07-12-2014, 09:57 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Leaning towards homeschooling...

I realize it's early as my son is not quite 2 1/2... but he is a very curious, sensitive, energetic little guy and I'm having serious doubts about his ability to sit and do "schoolwork" without being browbeaten into submission, so to speak. He HAS to keep moving, unless something really sparks his interest (books featuring cement mixers, Daddy's fishing magazine, etc) in which case he can be very focused.

He would rather walk down the street and watch the construction of a new house than read a book about it. Likewise, he jumps at the chance to help chop veggies, make soup, wipe down the windows and help put clothes in the dryer rather than watch me do it. I love that he gets so excited and physically involved in everything and I can't imagine him being able to sit and focus on lessons when there is so much he could be doing.

He is extremely social as well, saying hi to everyone in the supermarket or the playground. He gravitates towards younger kids, trying to hug them and bring them toys, and tends to get taken advantage of by older toddlers and kids. If I had to guess which personality type he'll end up as I would say ESFP. Everything is amazing to him and he'll notice and point out every detail, squealing and talking about it (or yelling, if he doesn't think you heard him the first time).

My husband thinks he can learn to sit and focus and doesn't foresee any problems at school, but my gut is telling me otherwise.

Is there really any reason to suspect that my son would have a hard time in school based on his current interests, abilities and preferences? Or am I reading too much into the fact that he is an active toddler and expecting a problem?
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#2 of 5 Old 07-12-2014, 12:30 PM
 
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I don't want to steer you away from homeschooling, as it is a lovely option, but a lot can change in the next 2 1/2 years. It feels too early to determine that he wouldn't be "successful" in a school environment. Children this age often develop in spurts, and it can be surprising to wake up one morning to realize they are now capable of x, y, or z.

That said, I understand the desire to look toward the future. My advice would be to do this with an open mind. I would research schooling options in your area... public, private, Montessori, homeschooling networks, the unschooling community. If you understand what's available in your area, as he matures you'll be better prepared to make the right decision for your family.
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#3 of 5 Old 07-12-2014, 01:28 PM
 
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Yeah, they sure change a lot at that age. That said, I remember thinking the same thing when my 6yo was 3....and I'm still thinking it! She is every bit as much a perpetual motion kid as she was as a toddler. I second the idea of exploring your options now, most homeschool groups here welcome kids before school age.
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#4 of 5 Old 07-13-2014, 07:38 AM
 
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A lot can change, but preschool is around the corner and you might decide to keep him home from that. Follow his interests and support them. He's already joining in with your activities. It sounds like a wonderful beginning.

Maybe a lot can change in 3 years, but even so, if you've got a kid who is as enthusiastic as your son, you've got the makings of a great homeschooling experience. So what if he can learn to sit still and focus? He still might be better off out of school.

If your only interest in homeschooling is whether he would adjust, I'd simply say it's too early to tell.

But if you are also thinking, "hey, if homeschooling is like this, I'd love to do it," then go for it, whether he would learn to sit or not. Many parents have decided to homeschool based solely on their observation that their kids are learning things at lightening speed and with great joy, why not continue with it?

"Let me see you stripped down to the bone. Let me hear you speaking just for me."
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#5 of 5 Old 07-14-2014, 08:37 AM
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Yep, a lot can change. Even if it does, you may still decide that homeschooling is right for you. After all, a child may learn to sit/behave in a classroom, but they may still thrive in a home environment.

A friend of mine had the most active/busy 2 yr old that I have ever seen. She was very worried that the school would want him on medication when he got older. His behavior seemed to be sensory-seeking a lot of times, but his pediatrician thought he was perhaps adhd. They tried preschool. He did fine with one teacher (first year) but the second teacher was terrible (second year). Mom pulled him out of preschool and "homeschooled" him for that. He learned so much at home that his mom realized that she could homeschool if it came to that. She didn't want to homeschool though (after all, it isn't for everyone). He just finished kindergarten this year. He did fantastic. The mom asked teacher about his attention, ability to sit, etc. The teacher said that she had no worries at all about him. Sure, he is still a very active kid. I think he will always be active. That doesn't mean that he can't also learn that there is a time and a place for it.

Amy

Mom to three very active girls Anna (14), Kayla (11), Maya (8). 
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