trying to understand why HS vs. PS - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

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#31 of 57 Old 07-29-2002, 08:19 PM
 
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I also need to note that I had a terrible experience in a multiage classroom...I was ADD and there was no guidence or support, I was mercilessly picked on there as well...

Not all areas have many options that are workable. We are going to try the public schools but I am strongly considering HS...
We are not a Waldorf family and the other non ps options are all catholic or christian(we are not) Our school district frowns upon teacher selection by parents and will likely make it tough for us to do this. I hope that school will be a good match but if not, well HS here we come
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#32 of 57 Old 07-29-2002, 08:59 PM
 
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Kirsten I am just getting ready to start homeschool preschool and am begining to wonder if it will be a lot harder than I think. My reason for wanting to homeschool is to be a lot more envolved in my childrens education than what they bring home at night.
I also feel like some of the other Mom's suggested that sittining in a class room 7 hrs a day is not necessary for a child.
I think some sturcture is needed but look forward to do learning activities that apply the 3 r's.

I went to public school until 5th grade. My Dad was school board president when they pulled myself and two younger brothers out of school. My dad did the homeschooling, Mom said she didn't have the patients for it.

We got up and went out to work. Came in had breakfast and did a couple subjects. Went out to work or play till lunch. Read a histroy book after meals. Went back out to work or play and then did some type of paper work (book report or prepared for a verbal presentation) in the evening. In the winter we got up and did some of our school work before daylight.

Because we were farmers we could make our own schedule and we didn't get sick of it or really feel like we were in school all day.

The puplic schools where we came from in N.Y. were poor quality. The public school close to were I grew up in MO was really bad. The only private schools here would be about a 25 mile drive for us so that alone would be 100 mile a day on the road. That would be too much expence and time on the road besides the cost of private school it's self.

I am quite sure there are not charter schools in our local town so that would mean the 100mile a day commutes if there was one in our bigger city.
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#33 of 57 Old 07-29-2002, 10:39 PM
 
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This is "one" of the reasons I am seriously considering pulling my daughter out of public school and homeschooling (probably in one year but could change to sooner)

http://www.naturalchild.com/

If you go to articles and then:

Book excerpt:

Common Objections to Homeschooling

by John Holt


I also don't agree with a bunch of twelve year olds teaching each other to become sheeple.
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#34 of 57 Old 07-30-2002, 11:22 AM
 
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Originally posted by Joan
Why do people find it disturbing that an 8 year old does not read? At what age "should" a child be reading and why?
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
This is another reason I will homeschool dd. In Tx, if a child isn't reading by kindergarten, the month of december, then they are marked remedial for the rest of their school career. shake I don't want that experience for my daughter just because she isn't ready to read yet. Schools are tending to push children to do things younger and younger and if they can't, they are left behind feeling stupid. I think that is ridiculous, of course, and I love the Raymonds book, Better Late Than EArly.
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#35 of 57 Old 07-30-2002, 11:35 AM
 
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momtogmn, Isn't that a shame? I was thinking yesterday how all the hsing parents I've spoken to have that same thought: That their children will read when they are ready. From what I've seen, the children DO learn and they enjoy it. In contrast, as you said, the ps children who do not learn to read by ___ age end up in remedial "help" and special classes, with the (either implied or stated) feeling that something is wrong with them, that they're not good enough, or not trying hard enough etc. The tutors and teachers I've spoken with all truely believe that they are helping, and that they are putting their help in a positive light. The children I've spoken to though all think they are in these programs because they are stupid.

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#36 of 57 Old 07-30-2002, 11:36 AM
 
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That is soooo very sad that kids get labeled so young now
days and so much expected out of them! I saw a report years ago on TV about if young kids are pushed too much too soon to learn, that it can actually do some kind of damage that really would prevent children from being able to learn. I am sorry I forgot the medical name for this and I am sure I am not explaining it the best, but you get the idea of what I am saying, I hope.
Does anyone else remember in school their first reading books being, See Spot, See Spot run? lol See Jane?? I was totally blown away when I saw my child's first grade reading book! I think more and more they are trying to take the kid out of the kid and just too much expected of them! If a child can learn younger that is great and I would encourage them to do so, but to pressure young kids to learn, I just do not agree with! Its like they are not in school longggggg enough, not enough years, as they want them out of the crib reading, writing, and doing math. Yea, a slight exaggeration, but not much.
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#37 of 57 Old 07-30-2002, 01:57 PM
 
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I am trying my first year of HSing my two sons 5 and almost 8. My oldest son went to the local PS for K and 1st grade. I love the school and the teachers, we live in a small area and already knew some of the teachers at the school. However, my son did not. He has chosen to HS because in his words " I am not learning anything, it's boring and I want to be with my family." I keep asking him if he's sure he won't miss school as he knows all of the children and enjoys being with them. I remind him of Valentines parties, Halloween, etc. He says our family will celebrate them together. I figure we will take it year by year. He is making the decision to HS and if he decides to try PS or any other I will let him try it...knowing that he probably would change his mind to HS anyway.

BTW this is a great and civilized discussion we have going here, we should be proud ourselves. Steph
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#38 of 57 Old 08-01-2002, 12:06 PM
 
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I finally read the whole thread so I finally get to add my 2 cents!

I feel strongly that different things work for different families (or even different kids in the same family) at different times for totally different reasons. We are homeschooling now, but some day we may not be for reasons that we cannot foresee. I think the important question isn't whether homeschooling is good or bad, but if a particular child is in the best place for him or her at this time.

When homeschooling is good, it is very very good. But the flip side is also true, when homeschooling is bad, it is awful. There are homeschooling families doing a rotton job of raising and educating their children. It isn't a question of unschooling vs structuce, it is a question of how much time and energy the parents have for the child and how emotional healthy they are.

It is taboo in the homeschooling community to admit that their are people homeschooling who shouldn't be. There are homeschoolers who park their kids infront of the TV, or focus on making their oldest a superstar while ignoring their younger children, or beat their children with a belt if they refuse to do their school work. My sister is bipolar and refuses to take medication. She is homeschooling but her kids would be better off in school.

The Amway family sounds like they weren't doing much of anything. Unschooling is not the same as not doing anything. Many 8 year olds can't read (both in and out of school) but the parents lack of knowledge that their DD was ready to read and wanted to read are very troubling. Unschoolers help their children learn the things they want to learn. There is a difference between educational neglect and unschooling.
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#39 of 57 Old 08-01-2002, 04:01 PM
 
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Linda in Arizona I agree with you. It is not as important what type of schooling a child is getting as the amount of interest you take in your children. Even PS children turn out with a better quality of education if the parents take an interest in them, participate in school activities, help with homework etc...

I also have seem homeschool teenagers that could not speak proper english and parents that sheltered their kids so much that when they did get out in the world they went crazy. These are the types of things that HS get labeled with but it is not the norm with homeschoolers.

I do like the idea of having a little more control over who my kids associate with than sending them off to school 7 hrs a day with no parental guidance. There are also such an increase in guns, drugs and sex in or near schools that it is a real fear for many parents.
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#40 of 57 Old 08-02-2002, 11:14 PM
 
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This was written by Fran Eaton, a hsing mom in IL. I think she is very insightful.

So, Just Who Shouldn't Home School?

Tuesday, July 30, 2002

By Fran Eaton

Maybe there are some families who shouldn't home school.
When we began home schooling in 1985, I was very nervous about the "leap of faith" our family was taking. No one, but only the most psychologically-distressed, would ever want anything but the very best for his or her children. No one thinking soundly would ever want their children to be ill-equipped for life.


Once we were home schooling, I couldn't understand why more people didn't try it. In order to justify our family's choice, I felt compelled to explain our choice to others. Often the response was a negative one, "That's nice for you, but I could never home school." I'd hear, "I could never be tied to my kids all day and stay sane," or "Don't you feel like you're missing out on life?"


But is home schooling for everyone? Or are there people who simply shouldn't try to keep their kids at home?


Through the years, we've counseled literally hundreds of families about whether or not they should home school. We've seen some try and give up. We've seen some start and then get weary. We've seen many, many continue through bumps and family crises, only to be successful in the end.


Who shouldn't home school? What are the tell-tale signs of families who shouldn't be encouraged to teach their own children?


How about a couple who is having serious financial problems and about to lose their home?

How about a woman who began homeschooling her children, only to find out six years later that her husband was committing sexually deviant acts that would send him to jail, leaving her to provide for five children?


How about a grandmother who has serious health problems?


How about a family whose father is suddenly killed in a farming accident?


Should these families teach their own children at home?

Difficult or dysfunctional family situations are possibly the only reason why more families should not try to home school. One thing we found through the years -- if a problem within the family exists, home schooling will force the dysfunction to the front burner, where the problem can no longer be ignored. Not only is the problem on the front burner, the heat is turned up when personal interaction intensifies in the home school setting.

But while help is often needed through pastors or family counselors, person after person has shared with us through the years how happy they are that they dealt with their marriage problems or their children challenges head-on, rather than hiding from them. Because of home schooling, they were forced to face the problems, and worked through them successfully.

There are some who shouldn't home school:


Home schooling is not for the faint-hearted.

Home schooling is not for those who are unwilling to deal with personality or spiritual weaknesses.

Home schooling is not for those who are too proud to ask for help.

Home schooling is not for people who will not think for themselves.

Home schooling is not for those unwilling to take a "different path."

Home schooling is not for those who require tangible, immediate results.

Home schooling is not for those who are unwilling to learn patience.

Home schooling is not for those who are peer dependent.

Home schooling is not for those who are too busy to invest time in the next generation.

Home schooling is not for the selfish.

Home schooling is not for those who are satisfied with the world around them.

Home schooling is not for those who are unwilling to sacrifice prestige and notoriety for the admiring eyes of their own children.

Lack of education, lack of finances, lack of family stability, lack of good parenting skills, lack of patience -- we have seen home schooling families rise above each of these obstacles through the years. They are not reasons to keep from home schooling.


In a recent Home School Legal Defense Association web poll taken by 989 respondents, 49% said religious conviction is the main reason they continue home schooling; 15% positive social environment; 14% academic excellence; 12% specific needs of child; 5% curriculum choice; and 5% flexibility.


These statistics bear out with the reasons families give for home schooling in Illinois. If none of those reasons matter to you, it is likely that you should not consider home schooling for your children.


Having problems does not disqualify a family from trying home education for their children. As a matter of fact, the strength and determination demonstrated by parents willing to overcome family challenges sends a loud and clear message to impressionable children that they are worth all that it takes to help them accomplish their lives' purpose.


There are few, if any, who shouldn't home school.
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#41 of 57 Old 08-07-2002, 01:15 PM
 
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Hi,

I am new here, and it took me most of the night to read through all the postws in this thread, but I made it...

I have a few comments.

My daughter has asked to go to ps- we took her out of private school after 3rd grade. she hated it and wanted to hs, after a few months she asked about goingto the local ps with her neighborhood friends. But I convinced her thjat everything she hated about the private school ( teasing, wasting time, kill and rill exercise, etc) was worse at the ps. She asked again to go last year, but only to attend scouting ( only available through schools here in Indonesia) so we started our own scouting group.

Now that we've been at it 15 months, and I've read John Holt and some other books and joined a few email lists, I would hope she would never go to school, until college, and I don't think she'll want to. We enjoy the freedom just too much.

Do read Dumbing us Down, Kirsten, and you'll see even more what we're all talking about. I also smiled at your comments about how many things are great about your daughter's school ( and don't get me wrong- it sounds like an awesome school as far as schools go...) . I hear these kinds of comments all the time, parents feel so attached to the choice they've made for their kids, and I have to wonder if they feel attached to it, just because it is what they're doing and they want to feel good about it. My point being, don't forget to think outside the box once in a while. Don't assume your dd's school is what's *best*, maybe hsing is *better*

The only other point I want to make, it that while your dd's school sounds great as a school, they certainly do lots of wonderful things and seem to solve problems well, she still is spending 7 hours a day away from you that could be spent with you, increasing the bond you wroked so heard to build when she was small. Hsing is a natural extension of attachment parenting, and one of the best side effects of homeschooling is the lack of teenage angst and rebellion, mainly because the child-parent bond is so strong.

Read John Holt and John Taylor Gatto and get back to us with what you think now...

peace,
virginia
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#42 of 57 Old 08-07-2002, 03:20 PM
 
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not that it's so important, in the grand scheme of this discussion...I just wanted to state a few of my reasons for making the decision to homeschool.

We have a very spirited child, who thrives in small group settings. She needs direct, undivided attention and I've never seen her get that in a preschool setting.

We sent her to preschool and found that the only thing she learned was how to behave poorly, say rude words (and some curse words), and to be disrespectful to authority (from some of the children in her class).

In that entire year, I could have taught her so much more at home! She is a very bright child, and I am quite concerned that putting her in Kindergarten *next* year will just be a hinderance to her. She is four now, and beginning to read, writing well-formed letters, her comprehension is spectacular, she completes basic arithmetic, and is a spectacular baker! She understands science concepts, she cooperates well, and (most of the time) works well with others. She is socially mature, primarily learning from the way my husband and I interact instead of other four year olds, which I believe is more like the "real" world.

We will homeschool her until college, and then she'll go on to a university. We have homeschooling extra curriculars here (a band, tutors, sports teams, even a graduation ceremony) and I hope she'll take an interest in some of these things.

For us, it seems the only option. We are Christian, which is a fundamental part of our lives. While I celebrate diversity, I am not happy that violence is more prevalent in our schools than God.

Hope that helps some!
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#43 of 57 Old 08-07-2002, 08:33 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I did read some John Holt (someone included a link somewhere on this thread to an article on the web). It seemed to be a very good overview of his ideas and I think I got the gist of it. I agree with some points and disagree with others.
I think we can all agree - well, I shouldn't say that... . I think there is a big range of what you will find in the many public schools. In some, yes there is violence, teasing, poor language, etc. I had a positive PS experience but even so, I did not just blindly hand over my child to the closest elementary. I made phone calls and visits to many local public schools (we have three elementaries plus the alternative program that we ultimately decided on). I talked to teachers and principals. I talked to many, many parents of kids in each school. I sat in on parent meetings at the schools to gather information (figuring they would not realize I had no kids there yet - most schools have 500 kids in our area so would they recognize all 1000 parents?) In the end I was lucky enough to find the small (75 kids), alternative, multi-age program in our town. We had lived here for 10 years at that point and had never heard of it.
My child has not picked up any bad language or behaviors at school. One of the neat things about her school is the required parental involvement. So I am there each week to see for myself what is happening. Am I there every minute? No. But I feel good about what happens there - not just because I am trying to rationalize my decision to send her there. I have been amazed over and over to see how well the kids treat each other. It is a very kind environment. I think many homeschoolers would be amazed at how much they liked our school (or ones like it) if they looked. And just to clarify, she is in school 5 1/2 hours a day.
One other thing I wanted to mention - our former principal often used the phrase "think outside the box" so I had to smile when Virginia (I think it was) used that term also. Our former principal and one teacher presented at a state conference - our school will be a model for others if funding works out right. She left her principal position to take a job with the Superintendent of Public Instruction in the state of Washington. We were sad to lose her but the kids of this state will benefit from her "outside the box" thinking.
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#44 of 57 Old 08-07-2002, 08:57 PM
 
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Kirsten, I'm confused. Are you trying to learn more about homeschooling or interested on selling us on public school?:

~Jill
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#45 of 57 Old 08-07-2002, 09:11 PM
 
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Kristen,

I think it is great that you have found an option that is working well for your child. Different things work for different families for different reasons. I don't think that anyone should have to defend their well informed decisions regarding their children. I think that kids would be better off if more parents spent the kind of time that you did researching options and trying to figure out what is best for their kids.

But please respect that everyone on a homeschooling board has researched and researched and researched their decisions. After our research, we came to a different conclusion that you did. And that is fine. Really.
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#46 of 57 Old 08-07-2002, 09:58 PM
 
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Throughout this whole discussion, I've been thinking:

If a homeschooler was to go to the ps/alternative board and state in detail how wonderful hsing is, how happy they are with it, how much they researched it, and stated that they would never send their child to public school, how do you think it would go over?

What if that same hser inferred that the psing families were sending their children to school because they hadn't looked into their options or because they didn't realize that hsing was so great? What if the hser said that they'd never send their child to school even if the child wanted to go to school?

Somehow I can't imagine that discussion being well-received there either.

I agree with Jill, this is really sounding like a sales pitch for school.

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#47 of 57 Old 08-07-2002, 11:01 PM
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I think that the main thing is that it doesn't *need to be* homeschooling VS. public schooling, or homeschooling is better than public schooling or vise versa. How about we all just make our own choices about what we feel is best for ourselves and our children and leave it at that? I don't really see why we need to debate which is better, or even why one is just as good as the other.

Kirsten, your child's school sounds great - I think you've made a great choice that you seem very happy with. I don't neccesarily agree with the statement that "many homeschoolers would be amazed at how much they liked our school (or ones like it) if they looked". I personally have no interest in looking into any schools at this point. I've already made my choice to unschool my kids (after much deliberation and investigation - similar to how you made your decision) - just as you aren't interested in trying out homeschooling because you've found what works best for you.

xo - Kelly

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#48 of 57 Old 08-07-2002, 11:06 PM
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Ditto to the posts ahead of me - I was getting the kids to bed and didn't read those before I posted. -Kelly

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#49 of 57 Old 08-07-2002, 11:13 PM - Thread Starter
 
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No, I am not trying to change any minds here. I know better than to think I could convince any HS families to send their kids to PS. And that was not my intent originally. My original post - and the reason I put it on this board as opposed to any other - was to find out why people HS. Seems like the best place to get information is from people who know and love it. Why would I ask on the PS board? That is like a friend of mine who asked her obstetrician if he thought she should go see a midwife for her next pregnancy.
I never considered HS as a viable option for my family and hope I did not give the impression that I was trying to be "won over" either. In the past, I have had poor opinions of HS (Amway family post) and had been quite vocal in my thoughts about it when it came up as a topic of conversation. But in the last seven or eight years, I have been exposed to many families who choose more alternative options. This came from being around midwives, Bradley childbirth teachers and students, etc. As some of them, who I like and respect as parents, began to take different paths I was able to reexamine some of my opinions. In trying to be more open minded, I thought that the Mothering boards would be a good place to get a better understanding. I did not set out to ruffle any feathers. I'm sure I have though that was not my intent. I explained some of what happens at my daughter's school to try to show that some of the reasons why people HS can be found at some alternative (and even maybe some traditional though probably unlikely) schools. We are not so far apart in our thoughts regarding school as you may think.
Thank you to the people who took my question as I meant it and posted why they make this choice without getting angry with me.
Feel free to continue this discussion but PM me if you would like a reply from me as I will be on other Mothering boards.
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#50 of 57 Old 08-07-2002, 11:45 PM
 
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kirsten first of all i want to personally and warmly thank you for this thread. i have been wondering and wondering what i wanted to do about schooling my son since his conception.
now that hes three and a half i am feeling the pressure to make a decision. or at least do loads of reseach on the subject, so i have been lurking on these shooling boards for the past few weeks.

i have not learned so much in these last weeks as i have from this one thread. and i am grateul for the oppertunity. kirsten i feel that you have been very clear and responsible in your posts, q's and a's alike and i do not think you have been preachy at all.

i am comeing from a position of needing these forums to help me make an informed desicions, not to get support for a firm decision i have already made. there have been questions asked and info provide i did not know how to ask for.

i too have had some of the apperant closeminded thoughts about hs'ing. should i be put down for that? i think not. it would seem to me that courage of asking and responding honestly and secerly to a subject additingly not known about is a characteristic of great quality. and one i feel that hs'ing should support. how would i know better without a direct personal experiance? and if i hadnt had one or one that was skewed then shouldnt i ask? and how would i find out about hsing and how it really is without asking? would i offend if i didnt already know? and the same about psing, how would i really get a fair response if i just stayed in my relative corner? especially since i know little of each i need info on all options and views. and i hope that when i am more experainced and informed i feel like i can come here to ask those with personal experaince.

kirsten, your school sounds absolutely wonderful to me. it sounds like a community, something i think is in great lacking in modern times, be it mainstream or "natural" lifestyles. and i am happy to think that there are ne orginizations out there careing so much. it also sounds like it doesnt have ne of the issues presented in the minuses list of why ps is not good. from what ive learned about your involvement and consideration concerning your choice of shcool shows you to be a very thoughtful,loving,concious parent, and i think your daugter is very lucky to have you.

Vanna's mom i benifited greatly from your post,Greatly, thank you.

thanks to everyone who contributed to this discusion, i am very grateful.



p.s kirsten i notice we both reside in wa state, would you be willing to send me some info on your school and or tell me how to look up my areas options?


o and obviously whatever i decide i will not be teaching my son to spell that would be a true discervice :LOL
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#51 of 57 Old 08-09-2002, 11:53 AM
 
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I think the point is that this board is open to people who come here to make informed decisions, ask honest questions, and truly learn why we homeschool. But it sometimes seems that people come here with their minds made up and maybe to stir up trouble. Now kirsten said that wasn't her goal and that is fine. I personally don't see her need to ask the questions here since her mind is made up that she would never homeschool. Just as I would go to the ps board and ask why they had chosen that option and what are the benefits, etc. I would do that because my mind is already made up that my kids will not ever attend a publie school. Does that make sense?

Now, Kirsten, you are happy with your choice of schools, and that is fine. For many of us there are reasons why we might say 'that is an ok program, but still not right for my child'. Why? because we are still looking for better than that. I want my kids with me daily, even 5 1/2 hours is too much imo for a child age 5, and since she is my child, it is my choice. One I can finally say that I am quite at peace with and comfortable saying 'this is how it is for us!'. And that is a good feeling.

To fionnes mom, there are many things you can teach your children, even if you don't excell at them yourself. That is what books are for. : )
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#52 of 57 Old 08-10-2002, 11:41 AM
 
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I think kirsten, that your school sounds like a wonderful option. I wish that their was some type of options for us. The plain fact is for us that our only options are PS or HS because we live quite rural.

Our life style is such that re-locating is not a viable option. I also feel that homeschooling is a great second option. One that we can tailor to fit our needs.

If you have more options than PS or HS where you live, more power to you! Please just do not look down on those of us that don't feel like we have other options. We can still give our kids a great education.
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#53 of 57 Old 08-10-2002, 07:46 PM
 
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Also, for our family, my husband is military, so we move every few years, and the stability and continuity of the children's education would not be guaranteed, there would be gaps, I'm sure, in what they have learned at what grade level, and my kids would miss out on something. If i had chosen public school, my son would have attended 3 different schools during his kindergarten year. Not a great thing for a 5 year old, imo.
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#54 of 57 Old 08-12-2002, 11:58 PM
 
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kirsten said:
I did not just blindly hand over my child to the closest elementary. I made phone calls and visits to many local public schools (we have three elementaries plus the alternative program that we ultimately decided on).I talked to teachers and principals. I talked to many, many parents of kids in each school. I sat in on parent meetings at the schools to gather information (figuring they would not realize I had no kids there yet - most schools have 500 kids in our area so would they recognize all 1000 parents?) In the end I was lucky enough to find the small (75 kids), alternative, multi-age program in our town. We had lived here for 10 years at that point and had never heard of it.

let me see if i can convey my point here, and excuse the typos, sleeping babe in my arms.

what i see happening here (Bali, indonesia) where we expats have few choices for western education, is parents doing all this research and then feeling attached to their decision, feeling they have a vested interested in the choice they made because of how hard they worked to come to that choice, that they totally discount a new option that comes along, namely hsing, in a kind of "we made our decision and we're sticking to it" kind of attitude.

so what i'm trying to say, kirsten, is that while your dd's program sounds awesome (and faced with a choice like that i may not have considered hsing either), don't feel so attached to it that you don't let go when you may need to. a good sign that school is not going well for your child is when a child creates stress in the morning in an effort to not have to go. whining, complaining, feet-dragging, etc in the morning before school tells you that school is not good for that child.

i am so happy to be done with ther stresses created by by dd's attendence in school: getting up with the alarm clock, struggling to create a b'fast she will eat and fast, doing her hair, making sure she has suitable clothes, making the bus, supplying things she forget to tell me about in advance but remembered the day she was supposed to have it, homework, lunch, and most of the PTO and it's meetings, fundraising and problems.now i have all the time formally used by that stuff to spend directly with dd! why work hard to create a good school and hope it filters down to my kid when i can just spend time and effort with my kid and know it does her good. there are other ways i can give back to the community.

take care,
virginia
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#55 of 57 Old 08-13-2002, 11:44 AM
 
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Virginia,
Can you tell me a little about the education system/laws in Bali and if there are many homeschoolers you have met native or are they mostly expats? What is the PS like there? I realize this is off the thread but I am so-oo curious.
Mary
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#56 of 57 Old 08-14-2002, 01:30 AM
 
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Hsing is not allowed in Indonesia. The entire education system is tightly controlled with all exams coming from a central government (formerly from Jakarta, now the States have more autonomy and write their own exams). You can drop out of school after 6th grade, the last grade that is free, but hsing is not recognized. You have to have a diploma to enter any trade school or university, and to apply for most decent jobs. And you can't go back and continue school after a certain age as there are age restrictions. It's a bit crazy. But we foreign nationals who live here are outside the law. They don't care what we do and it's a great feeling of freedom to be able to hs without any government breathing down our backs.

Virginia
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#57 of 57 Old 08-14-2002, 04:11 PM
 
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Thank you for sharing that. We are in IL and this is the first place we have lived that we have no restrictions or real requirements. It is very liberating!!
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