Sazuki Teaching Method? - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 29 Old 09-09-2002, 12:48 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Has anyone heard of the Sazuki Teaching Method?
I may be spelling it wrong but I can't find anything about it on the web.
It is supposed to be a teaching method that uses music and teaching parent and child an instrument together.
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#2 of 29 Old 09-09-2002, 03:12 PM
 
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It's "Suzuki."

http://www.suzukiassociation.org/

http://www.suzuki-music.com/

Single Mom to 3 (12, 17 & 21)  luxlove.gif and dog2.gif.

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#3 of 29 Old 09-11-2002, 06:52 PM - Thread Starter
 
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So has anyone here ever used it? and likes or dislikes?
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#4 of 29 Old 09-11-2002, 07:28 PM
 
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I think it depends on the instrument that your child would be learning. My understanding is that the Suzuki method is very well respected for string instruments, such as violin. It is much more controversial when it comes to piano. When I majored in music and took Piano Pedagogy, our professor had no good to say about Suzuki and didn't even mention it with any seriousness when we discussed the various teaching methods for piano. I didn't know any piano teacher (university-related) in that area who used Suzuki. It is controversial because many traditional teachers feel that it doesn't focus enough on getting students to read music. They become wonderful listeners, and therefore their musicianship is great, they play expressively, but they can't read music fluently, which is a must for a pianist, I think much more than for a violinist.

I would love to hear some opinions from the other side. I personally am only marginally familiar with the method, although one of my brothers learned piano using it (quit after one year--but that wasn't necessarily Suzuki's fault). I am only going off the opinions of great musicians and educators that I highly respect. And again, I can only speak for piano.
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#5 of 29 Old 09-13-2002, 06:28 PM
 
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My dh and I both have degrees in music. He thinks it is a good prograom....I'm not sure.

By using the Suzuki Method you will develop a different type of musician. I believe that Suzuki focuses a lot on training the ear more than the fingers.I'm about learning music classically. Once you learn the proper way then there is a who;e world opened up to you. BUT Suzuki is pretty good especially if that is your only choice. I'd say if you can find a private teacher it might be slower learning but it may be worth it.

I'm a little biased about the method based on the training I have BUT there isn't anything wrong with it...I just prefer something different!!

Megan and Tracy 4/26/02--who may be reading music before words!!!

Single Mom to 2 amazing little men. T(7) and B(5)
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#6 of 29 Old 10-16-2002, 09:35 PM
 
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We've had three-1/2 years of Suzuki violin (since dd was 34 months old), and it all boils down to the teacher. We had to fire our first teacher who almost destroyed any love of music in dd AND me. [how many days did you practice? seven? good. how many days did you listen to the tape? only three? well, you don't get a sticker until you practice AND listen all seven days.] Our second teacher was wonderful, but our third teacher (we moved to another state) is unbelievably fabulous.

I think if the teacher is too dogmatic it's awful. But we have had excellent experiences with two teachers who have been very positive and innovative. I found it to be great preparation for homeschooling, in that I learned a lot about dd's learning style - what motivates her, what turns her off, etc. We went through some dark months when I wondered why we were doing it, but now she's almost 6 and she can is always trying to figure out new music on her violin -- she also takes her violin pieces and plays them on the piano, the harp, and the recorder (no lessons for other instruments, thank you). Sometimes I have to limit her practice because I don't want her to burn out. Starting practice usually takes some prompting, but once we've begun she's great -- but this took a few years to develop.

okay, i've strayed from the original question.
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#7 of 29 Old 10-17-2002, 11:06 AM
 
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I'm also a classically trained musician (violin). I studied the Suzuki method as a child, but my teacher didn't follow the method 100% - we didn't listen to the tapes very much, and I started reading music when I was six or seven (concurrent with starting piano lessons with another, non-Suzuki teacher). By the time I was 13 I switched to another violin teacher. I have serious issues with the Suzuki teacher I had - I learned a lot of bad habits in my technique that took years to get over - but that's more about the teacher and the fact that she was trained as a clarinet player. :

I agree with Laurel - in academia, Suzuki is considered a good thing more for young kids who won't necessarily become professional musicians. Not only is sight reading an issue, but there is the idea that since Suzuki students constantly listen to each piece being played one way, by the same person, that it's hard for them to develop their own unique musical ideas, and that they tend to play in a sort of cookie-cutter imitative way.

I also agree with Erica that, as in all subjects, and all methods, it all boils down to the teacher. If you find a Suzuki teacher who seems to work well with your child, then great! Otherwise, you might want to shop around.

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#8 of 29 Old 10-17-2002, 11:31 AM
 
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in academia, Suzuki is considered a good thing more for young kids who won't necessarily become professional musicians.

And yet, at age 5, 6, or 7, we have no idea who will become a professional musician and who won't.

(Straying from original topic): So many parents think it's OK to scrimp on the quality of the teacher because "she's just a beginner". The teacher, like Erika mentioned, can make or break a child's whole experience. People ask me all the time why I don't teach piano, since I play the piano. I don't teach piano because I am not qualified to be a really good piano teacher. I'm trained as an organist. I have friends who are truly fantastic piano teachers, and after seeing the education they can provide for their students, that's what I want for my child and nothing less, regardless of whether or not I'm raising future professional musicians. (Plus, I just don't enjoy teaching piano, else I would probably feel more motivated to become that kind of teacher.)

Becca, thanks for clarifying the position of the "string world" on Suzuki.
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#9 of 29 Old 10-17-2002, 12:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally posted by Laurel

And yet, at age 5, 6, or 7, we have no idea who will become a professional musician and who won't.
I know, that's the frustrating part about trying to find one's child a good teacher! My Suzuki training would have been perfectly fine for me if violin had just been a hobby for a few years and I had gone on to be an accountant or something.

I know what you mean about teaching - I haven't taught violin, either. My degrees are in theory and composition, and I taught aural skills and theory to undergrads for three years, but that's another story... I've considered teaching violin at some point, simply because it would be a logical part-time thing I could do if and when then kids are at school, but I'd want to start small, with beginners, just to get my feet wet and see how it goes.

Another off-topic question: Are you working as a musician now, Laurel? I work as a very part-time freelancer, averaging about two nights out per week at the moment. It's actually a bit more than I'd like, since ds#2 is six months old now and separation anxiety has hit us big time, so I'm trying not to add any more gigs on my calendar until after Christmas.
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#10 of 29 Old 10-17-2002, 08:39 PM
 
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Becca,

THANKS FOR YOUR POST!!!!!

My DD just started violen lessons a month ago with a well trained and respected teacher. (I called the symphony for a recomendation). I have taken so much crap for not having my DD in Suzuki lessons! My DD (who is 6) really likes her teacher even though she finds it hard work.

your post made me feel better
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#11 of 29 Old 10-17-2002, 10:25 PM
 
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Aw, shucks! Glad I could be of help. I have no idea why there seems to be this notion floating around that Suzuki is the best/only way for a child to study violin. That's great that your dd is enjoying it! It can be hard to get going at first, because it really does take so long just to be able to play with a decent tone. Do you sit in on her lessons? One nice thing about Suzuki is that is really involves the parent, which I think is a good idea, especially for young kids. Have a great time with it!
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#12 of 29 Old 10-18-2002, 01:24 PM
 
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Becca-

I'm not working much right now. I have a 3 month old baby that I waited a very long time for, and I'm focusing on him right now. I had a student before he came, but just haven't been able to bring myself to start teaching again.

I haven't done much career-wise. I have a master's in organ performance and pedagogy. Since I graduated 4 years ago, I've held a part-time church job, had a struggling studio, and played for a handful of pretty low-key performances. Not very prestigious! We live in a small town, and it's hard to do much with the organ. I don't regret the time spent, and I love music, but I am thinking that I'll probably go back to school someday and get another master's in something different.
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#13 of 29 Old 10-18-2002, 02:45 PM
 
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This may be a bit off topic, but it is something that is working really well for us. I started taking violin lessons in February from a well-respected teacher in our area. She was amazed that an adult with three small children would want to start, but she also has three kids, so teaching in the midst of uproar is nothing to her. After about two months, my four year old son said, "Mom, how come you get all the fun? Why can't I play the violin?" The teacher reached over, picked up a 1/4 size violin and said, "Well, try this one." Now we go for a one hour lesson and I get sort of 50 minutes and he gets sort of 20 minutes (our teacher can't seem to get the idea that a one hour lesson is not 70 minutes long). We use the Suzuki book, and the teacher subscribes to "Suzuki Chat" and her sister is a Suzuki teacher, but we don't follow the program anywhere near accurately. He gets all the encouragement and excitement of doing something that I am interested in, and we are both moving at our own pace through the material. It may not make either of us into professional musicians, but it makes us very very happy right now.

What I am trying to say is don't look for a formula that give you a result, but instead look for a good situation that you can enjoy and that gives your children a chance to learn.
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#14 of 29 Old 10-18-2002, 05:50 PM
 
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Bestjob, I think that is such a wonderful idea!

Linda, aren't you from Tucson? I grew up in southern AZ, and I experienced the same thing. If you weren't a Suzuki student, you might as well be nothing, even though I was as good a pianist as most of them. I remember feeling very left out, and of course had no idea that once I got to college, Suzuki would be at the bottom of the pile anyway.
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#15 of 29 Old 10-18-2002, 11:37 PM
 
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<<Do you sit in on her lessons? >>

Yes. Her teacher wants me in on her lessons for several months so that I can help her practice. It is really quite causual. We met at a church and the lessons are in the room right next to the nursery. My younger DD plays in the nursery during her big sister's lessons, so I am back and forth between the rooms.

My DD loves the violin. She thinks the sound that it makes is the most beautiful sound in the world. Practicing has been a bit of an issue though. I finally realized that it makes her hand hurt when she practices for too long, so now she is just practicing for a few minutes at a time. I'm sure that progress with be slow for her for now, but I know that she is getting a good foundation.

Laurel, Yes, I'm in sunny Tucson!
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#16 of 29 Old 10-19-2002, 10:36 AM
 
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So, this is off-topic, but I guess a related question. If you aren't interested in Suzuki, what is an appropriate age range for a child to start learning violin or piano? I didn't start music lessons 'til they were offered through our school, and I would like to start DS earlier but have no idea when to try.
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#17 of 29 Old 10-19-2002, 11:50 AM
 
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This is really personal and depends alot on the individual child, and I can only speak for piano, but for me, I wouldn't start my child in piano lessons before about age 6. A child needs to develop fine motor skills to a certain degree before starting piano. Also, I don't think that the structure and discipline of formal lessons are always appropriate for young children.

BUT, what I would do is enroll my preschooler in an informal music & movement program like Kindermusik or Music Together. Or, I would create something similar at home. Young children need lots of informal experiences with music. They need to sing, to dance, and to have fun. These experiences form a basis that will make formal lessons more successful and more meaningful. They learn concepts about rhythm, melody, etc. that will give them a good foundation when they later learn an instrument.

My son is 3 months old. We listen to lots of classical music. I love to hold him and dance with him, wave his arms and have him "conduct" the music, etc. We do it mostly for fun, but I am also trying to help him do things like feel the beat and feel the emotional effect that music can have. Hopefully, we will fill his young childhood with these kinds of experiences, and music will become second nature to him. Then, when he does start learning an instrument, he will be able to connect in his mind what making music is all about.
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#18 of 29 Old 10-19-2002, 11:55 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Wow! Keep the responces coming! This thread has taken on a life of it's own and I love hearing your experiences! Until starting this thread I had never even heard of Suzuki Method.

Acutally the person that suggested it to me knew I want to home school. She suggested it as a way for Mom and child to learn together and possibly develope a learning atmosphere for homeschooling. Anyways, thanks again all
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#19 of 29 Old 10-19-2002, 02:04 PM
 
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Lisa,

That is very similar to what we did. I play piano and my DH plays percussion. We collected all sorts of instruments for the kids to just play and enjoy as soon as they were big enough to hold on them or bang on them (shakers, drums, recorders, etc.). We listen to all sorts of music and my kids see and hear my DH and I playing our instruments. We attend family concerts. My DDs showed both showed an interest in figuring out a bit about the piano when they were 3 or 4 and I answered their questions and played with them as much as they wanted. It was quite obvious to me that they were not ready for any sort of formal lessons. My older DD started begging for violin lessons last winter, when she was 5 1/2, and I felt that she was not ready. She just turned 6 (and went through some huge developmental leaps) and she just started lessons. I still think that she is quite young for lessons, and if it weren't for her incessant begging for them I would not have started her yet.

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#20 of 29 Old 10-22-2002, 02:17 PM
 
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Gardenrn, it is definitely true that learning something together builds a good environment for education. I have learned about music with my children (the oldest is 8 years old) through a variety of programs and lessons. Before kids, I thought I was not musical at all. Now my violin teacher thinks I may have perfect pitch! I have much more empathy for my children's troubles with learning something new than I would have had otherwise.
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#21 of 29 Old 10-23-2002, 11:58 PM
 
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I'm surprised I haven't seen this thread until now...

I am a violininst, got my degree in violin performance, and am now teaching about 10 violin students. My youngest is barely six, and I have three adult students. I am not Suzuki trained, but intend to as soon as we have the money and the time, but I am very familiar with the Suzuki method. I use a lot of the techniques when I'm starting students, regardless of their age, and blend in a lot of my own experiences and instinct. The beauty of the Suzuki method is that it teaches that every child can learn to play music, regardless of background. He believes that learning to play an instrument is like learning to speak. he also emphasizes a beautiful sound, and working together with teachers, parents and families. One of my favorite qoutes form his is "Where love is deep, much can be accomplished." I don't think anyone of us here would complain about that.

Now. THat being said, I think that teahing children anything needs to approached individually with each kid. A cookie cutter moethod is never going to work for every kid every time. One of the reasons I don't go crazy teaching the same things every day is because I have to really challenge myself to find a way to get a concept across to each individual student. And, I also put a big emphasis on note reading. We do a lot of listening, and all my beginners go through the first half of the first book or so learning strictly by ear. Whena student is first beginning, there is so much to learn without throwing music reading into the mix. I want my students to feel successful, like they can make msuic, before I throw one more complication at them. But, by the time they are finished witht he first book, they are fluent music readers. I can't emphasize enough the importance of note reading. I loved playing in orchestras throughout my life- and no one can be successful in orchestra if they can't read music.

I have a dd who just turned one, and she is one of the most musically "tuned in" children I have ever seen. She has heard me play since she was conceived, she sits and listens to the lessons I give, (In fact, dh has tried to take her downstairs so she's not in the way while I'm teaching and she crawls to the bottom of the stairs and cries until she can come up and listen to my lessons...) and she has spent the first year of her life coming to work aith me at a very busy music store. She dances and sings, and is so involved in music wherever she sees or hears it. I don't think that I will push her to take formal lessons, but I don't think taht I will keep her from it if she expresses an interest. Dh and I joke about gettng her a tiny 1/16th size violin for her birthday.

Personally, I didn't start playing the violin until I was 12, and feel like I missed out on a lot. Throughout my musical career I would have given anything to have my parents be involved and excited about the things that I was doing. I always get frustrated when people come into the music store where I work and they say that their son or daughter has been begging to play the violin for four or five years. I just think of all they could have accomplished in that time... I guess what I'm trying to say is that whatever you decide to do with music lessons, be involved and encouraging- I think that is the biggest key to your childs' success. (Pun intended!)

Wow. I didn't intend for this to turn out this long. Can you tell it's something I feel passionately about?

Violin teaching, doula-ing Mom to Abby, (8) Ashlynn, (6) : and Max (11/13/08) Diagnosed with Metopic Craniosynostosis. First surgery 5/1/09, Second surgery March 2010.
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#22 of 29 Old 10-24-2002, 12:19 AM
 
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Stacy, good point about not waiting too long. That's just as detrimental as starting too early. In graduate school, I did a paper on developing music aptitude. One theory, which made a whole lot of sense to me, divided musical development into two phases. Before about age 9 (of course, the exact age differs from child to child), music aptitude is variable. A child is born with a certain aptitude, and if the proper musical environment is there, that aptitude can be increased. The child's actual ability can be changed. The same is true if music is not nurtured in the child's environment--a child can lose his or her ability. After around age 9, aptitude becomes set in stone. The child can learn more "stuff" but his/her *ability* to learn music cannot be increased. This theory corresponds really well with everything I learned about brain development while studying early childhood education too. We don't have forever to wait. I too think it's extremely important to follow the child's lead. I couldn't imagine holding a child back if they were really eager to learn--although a desire to learn and readiness to learn it are not always the same.

edited to add that I'm using the words aptitude and ability interchangeably. Obviously, the more a child learns, they'll be able to play harder and harder pieces, so I guess techinically, ability will always increase with effort. But I mean ability in the sense of their ease at picking up music in general, and how easily they will transition from one level to the next.
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#23 of 29 Old 10-24-2002, 05:06 PM
 
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I was thinking of posting a very similar question a while ago!! I have been really interested in Suzuki as well. My son is 20 months old right now, and I do tons of musical play, singing, rhymes, dancing etc. with him. I just love the thought of him developing a love of music and the sense of himself as Able to Play that Suzuki seems to offer. But I worry that a lot of this is about me: I didn't get serious music lessons till I was 14, and, while I loved and love music, I guess my "aptitude" had already faded!!!
So is it better to wait till the child BEGS for lessons? Or just decide (based on cues of readiness, which are...?) that it's time to start and take the attitude that music is a great part of life, a given... How do you get them to practice? Especially if they aren't the ones who initiated the idea???
(maybe I should just start lessons now--inspired by Best Job!--and lessen the pressure on my son!!)
Genevieve
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#24 of 29 Old 10-25-2002, 05:05 PM
 
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I don't think you have to wait till their begging. There are signals of readiness. When you asked that question, I realized that I didn't even know for sure what they were, so did some looking around in my piano teaching books.

For piano:

Do they show interest in learning to play by doing things like trying to pick out melodies on the piano?

Do they have the attention span to be able to practice ten minutes at a time?

How is their fine motor coordination? Can they handle a pencil pretty well?

I'm not sure how I feel about the idea that music is a given. Music is a huge part of my life, and I do have a desire for all my children to appreciate it, and to play an instrument at least passably. I'd love it if all my children loved music and wanted to go far with it. I think that all my children will at least try music lessons, unless there's a child that I can absolutely tell it would not be right for. (And by "try", I don't mean just for a couple of months--I mean have a few years of lessons.) I'm still figuring out how I feel about how much of the influence is environment, vs. just innate talent or interest. My ds is too young for me to know yet.

I am hoping that dh and I can create enough of a stimulating musical environment in our home that our children will love it, whether or not they go on to play instruments well. I do believe that far more children have musical aptitude than we see evidence of--but so many just don't get the environment that draws out that aptitude. I don't think musical talent is something that's just reserved for a select few.

Another thing, I think, is the issue of finding the right instrument for the child. A child that isn't particularly motivated by the piano might simply love another instrument. I hated practicing until I starting playing the organ and found my true love.

The big thing with practicing, I think, is that most children don't know how to practice. They think that practicing means sitting down and playing the same thing over and over and over--and that would be boring for any of us. A good teacher will help them know how to practice effectively and how to engage their minds in their practicing, not just repeat the piece mindlessly.

For a younger child, I think the most effective way to get them to practice is for the parent to sit down beside them and coach them through it.

I'd love to hear what everyone else has to say!
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#25 of 29 Old 10-25-2002, 09:27 PM
 
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<<How do you get them to practice? >>

Part of my deal with my DD is that she can take lessons as long as she practices nearly everyday. If she doesn't want to do that at this time, that is fine. She is free to quit lessons. She can have the violin and just play with it when she feels like it, but if she isn't willing to practice on a regular basis then it is a waste of time and money for her to be in lessons. (If she were to quit for a while she could start again when she felt like she was ready.) She likes lessons a lot.

She doesn't have to practice for a set amount of time. If she just wants to play for 3 minutes, that is OK. Some days she plays for a long time, and some days only for a few minutes. At first I was keeping track of how long she played, but I quit when I realized how discouraging it was to my DD.

She has a little practice book that has one page for each week. There is room for her teacher to write her assignments down and for her to keep track of which days she practices.

I really don't think that kids who have no interest in learning an instrument should be forced to take lessons or practice. While we can help our children and nurture their interests, but we can't force a passion for music. That has to come from inside them.
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#26 of 29 Old 06-04-2003, 07:29 PM
 
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No matter what it is, I know I can find information about it here at Mothering-thanks everyone-you helped me out today!
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Hi, I was Suzuki trained as a child (violin for 12 years) and I just wanted to address one point. It is a really common misconception that Suzuki does not teach students to read music. The theory is actually that the child will start lessons at 3 or 4, and so they don't learn to read music until age 6 or 7, which is the age that they learn to read words! The Suzuki method believes in teaching to a child's developmental stage, so forcing reading on a 3 or 4-year old, like in conservatory teaching, is not considered optimal. A Suzuki teacher would be considered really remiss if they never taught anyone to read!! Plus, once you are done with Book 10, then you go and read whatever music it is you want to learn and you have to be able to read, especially once you are in orchestra.

I thought Suzuki was great! Mostly because of the group interactions. I had a whole world of violin and cello friends to hang out with from age 5 on, and every week I got to see them at group lesson, and once a month at full school concert, and then when we were older, in orchestra and quartet and music camp. Much better, in my opinion than the conservatory way of teaching where you are isolated in your room practicing and never get to meet another student.

This is all from a strings perspective though, I am aware of the criticism of the piano school and I think there is some validity there.

One more thing, I guess as with anything you need to check out the individual teachers and school. It's like how all these daycares these days claim to be Montessori, but all it mean is that they use a tray when you put the puzzle together. I think there are teachers that jumped on the Suzuki bandwagon without taking the training or understanding the theory behind the method. They have kind of tainted it for the rest of the awesome dedicated teachers.

Oh my, I'm writing a book! Also there are Suzuki-trained violinists, violists and cellists in most of the major symphonies in North America and Europe now, so it's just not true that Suzuki is only for kids on the non-professional track. Often people do switch teachers when they "graduate" from the books, which in my experience happened anywhere between 10 and 15 years old, and they sometimes went to non-Suzuki teachers, so maybe that's where that came from. I think that as the first wave of Suzuki-trained kids become teachers themselves, this may change and a Suzuki approach could be extended to older people.

Ok, enough spouting!

"MY best interest?...How can YOU say what MY best interest is?...When I went to YOUR schools, I went to YOUR churches, I went to YOUR institutional learning facilities."-ST
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#28 of 29 Old 06-06-2003, 06:27 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Wow I am so glad to see this thread come back to life!

My ds is now 5 and dd 3 they both love to sing and can carry a tune nicely. We probably don't do enough of it.

We now have an old piano in our home so they can sit down and play on it any time they want. They haven't actually tried to pick out a song but I find my ds playing repeat groups of keys while he hums and tries to make his own song as he goes along.

Maybe I should look again into finding a teacher for him sometime soon. Many of the readyness signs are not there yet though.
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#29 of 29 Old 06-06-2003, 08:15 PM
 
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What a fun thread! I am a Suzuki Violin teacher - well, I only teach my own kids now

I grew up in AZ, where there were a few kids here that did this method, most did not. I heard all the bad things about it that have already been posted. I went to NYC for graduate school and got a part-time job at a Suzuki music school. The founder happens to be Louise Behrend, who is one of the founders of the American Suzuki Assoc. Her school is considered to be a "model" school. She gave me a lot of books to read, and I observed a lot. I found out everything I had heard were false. I ended up doing 2 years of teacher training with her during graduate school, and ended up teaching there, and other wonderful schools in NY.

Since the Suzuki method really isn't a method, it's a philosophy, you can get a lot of different qualities of teaching. Each teacher has to bring their own teaching/playing ability to it. The ASA purposely doesn't allow specific books written that outline exactly what to do so as to encourage training. A lot of teachers simply use the books, but that is only a very small part of it.

There are different types of teacher training. Long-term and short-term. Some people get training during college or at a big Suzuki school. Most people get training during a short workshop. Ask about your teacher's training, and experience. Ask what training they have registered with the ASA - ie, how many books. You might be surprised to find out it is minimal.

Here is AZ, we have a local association of teachers that provides group classes that supplement the lessons. This is a very important part of the philosophy. The parent's are a vital part. These are young children, and they need guidance and help. Practicing is not just a "thing" you do. It is similar to homeschooling in that is a way of life. The environment is crucial. Practicing is an adult activity that we have to make child-like.

I could go on for years here, but one last thing about reading. This started in Japan, where music reading was one of the things children learned in school. When the method became popular here in the US, it struggled for a while until teachers realized they had to do it differently to make up for what the schools were doing over there. In my experience, the Suzuki students are far better readers than their counterparts because of the intense ear training. If a Suzuki student is not an outstanding reader, than the teacher is a fault. The School for Strings, where I was teaching, is considered the "pre" Pre-College of Juilliard. The entrance to get into Pre-College is almost harder than the regular college. Only a few are admitted each year. Most, if not all came from our Suzuki school. I could name drop and tell you all the famous violinists who started this way, but I think this is too long already.

LeAnn
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