A good school makes me qualified to hometeach... - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 50 Old 05-11-2005, 10:50 AM - Thread Starter
 
Jen123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 2,962
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
On another message board (a non homeschooling board) there was a thread about the top 100 schools in the nation. The article went on to list one thousand schools. We were commenting on which school we went to and what number it was. I said " Mine is #108". I had a couple people say (in a non snarky way...they actually feel this way) "then that's okay that you homeschool your kids since you went to a good school." ARGH. Completely and totally infuriating. Some of the best homeschoolers I know never graduated highschool. I told those other ladies " I graduated by the skin of my teeth with D's and one C."
THEN I heard "well afflulent people can do better at hs'ing". (because the school I went to was rich school. ) um...just cuz my parents lived in the right spot to send me to a good public school doesn't mean *I* am well to do right now. double argh.

Just goes to show ya when you think you can particpate with the masses they rear up and bite ya on the behind.
Jen123 is offline  
#2 of 50 Old 05-11-2005, 10:54 AM
 
SmilingChick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 180
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
What do you really expect from a message board, though? It's the nature of the beast. I haven't been on one message board where I haven't gotten annoyed at one time or another.
The fact that it was a non-h/s board indicates you probably won't find much support there.
SmilingChick is offline  
#3 of 50 Old 05-11-2005, 12:15 PM
 
chalupamom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 1,872
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
The "logic" behind this is crazy. Every school, no matter how "good" or "affluent" isn't that way across the board. No doubt the good people of the message board in question wouldn't consider every single graduate of the schools in question to be qualified for HSing. If the only criterion they're using is this list, they're including an awful lot of people that under other circumstances they'd object to.

Just shows how most external criteria applied to who should HS and how don't even work in the abstact, let alone in reality.
chalupamom is offline  
#4 of 50 Old 05-11-2005, 01:16 PM
 
moominmamma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: In the middle of nowhere, at the centre of everything.
Posts: 5,763
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 84 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jen123
"then that's okay that you homeschool your kids since you went to a good school."
By this same logic, it's only okay to send your child to school to be taught by schoolteachers if the teachers attended one of these top-1000 schools. But, by extension, if your child's 2nd grade teacher attended a school that ranks around #8,000, you should yank your child out of that classroom and ... what?

Miranda

Mountain mama to three great kids and one great grown-up

moominmamma is online now  
#5 of 50 Old 05-11-2005, 06:26 PM
 
Greaseball's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Eugene, OR
Posts: 8,764
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Besides, the "good schools" are only rated as such based on things like test scores and other numerical bits of data. The things I would look for would not even make a list. I doubt they have categories like "boys not suspended for showing up in dresses" or "students allowed to wear 'I love my vagina' pins" or "students allowed to go home whenever they want."
Greaseball is offline  
#6 of 50 Old 05-11-2005, 06:51 PM
 
annettemarie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: In the Restricted Section
Posts: 41,722
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
My step-mom has pulled the same crap (Well, it's OK for *you* to homeschool because you have a teaching degree). I just ignore the ignorance.

Greaseball, you forgot "girls allowed to wear tux for yearbook pics". :LOL

Flowers, fairies, gardens, and rainbows-- Seasons of Joy: 10 weeks of crafts, handwork, painting, coloring, circle time, fairy tales, and more!
Check out the blog for family fun, homeschooling, books, simple living, and 6 fabulous children, including twin toddlers

annettemarie is offline  
#7 of 50 Old 05-13-2005, 02:51 PM
 
urklemama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Seattle, mold capital of the world
Posts: 697
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Just to play devil's advocate, I live in a community where a lot of the parents I interact with are not qualified to homeschool, and they know it. Anyone who speaks and reads English is capable of homeschooling, but there's a lot of places in the States where that's not something you can assume. I don't think the ranking of your school is relevant in the slightest, but the quality of the education you received certainly is. In California, there is a whole second generation coming up now who can't use any of the resources we take for granted because they don;t have the English skills. Most of the people I talk to on a daily basis couldn't use this message board, for example.
urklemama is offline  
#8 of 50 Old 05-13-2005, 02:56 PM
 
annettemarie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: In the Restricted Section
Posts: 41,722
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
I don't understand your point.

Flowers, fairies, gardens, and rainbows-- Seasons of Joy: 10 weeks of crafts, handwork, painting, coloring, circle time, fairy tales, and more!
Check out the blog for family fun, homeschooling, books, simple living, and 6 fabulous children, including twin toddlers

annettemarie is offline  
#9 of 50 Old 05-13-2005, 03:16 PM
 
urklemama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Seattle, mold capital of the world
Posts: 697
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
There seems to be an assumption here that your education is totally irrelevant to your ability to teach your children. I understand that as a reaction to the silly attitude non-homeschoolers often have - that a homeschool parent must have the certifications necessary to replicate school at home - but it is possible to go too far the other way. Your educational background *is* relevant. I guess it shows up more for me b/c the conversation I have regularly isn't "you can homeschool your children because you went to a prestigious school" but "you can homeschool your children because you speak English" I think a lot of people who say the first thing are reaching inchoately for the second idea. You cannot homeschool your children effectively if you are cut off from the surrounding culture. I know a lot of people here probably *feel* cut off from the surrounding culture - but the people I interact with literally do not know things like the germ theory of disease, or that the earth goes round the sun instead of vice versa, or basic facts about geography or history, and self-education is going to be a tremendous project for them because they do not have the language skills. Everyone here has made choices to be more or less mainstream; my neighbors don't have any choices. They are out of the mainstream whether they like it or not.

Coming from a privileged perspective - and if English is your native language, you are privileged - it seems totally insane when non-homeschoolers start to spout nonsense about qualifying degrees and the rest of it. But taking the population of the US as a whole, and not just ourselves, they have a point. They're expressing it poorly - the ranking of your school is irrelevant - but they have the right idea. Your cultural and educational background matter TREMENDOUSLY.

Interestingly, though, in my experience people without the English skills never ever ever want to homeschool. They want it for their grandchildren, but they want their children to speak English and they know they can't provide that.
urklemama is offline  
#10 of 50 Old 05-13-2005, 03:23 PM
 
Greaseball's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Eugene, OR
Posts: 8,764
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
I am a high school dropot who has no knowledge of any part of American history. I can name maybe ten U.S. presidents; I don't know what the Civil War was about or when it ended; I have no idea what is going on in Iraq right now. I am the absolute best teacher my children could ever have. And no, I'm not shipping them off to public school if they want to learn about history!

So no, it's not necessary to know about one's surrounding culture to homeschool effectively.

It could be seen as racist to say that hsers need to speak English. There are a lot of hispanic families in town who don't want to speak English and if they want to raise their kids to speak only Spanish, what's wrong with that?
Greaseball is offline  
#11 of 50 Old 05-13-2005, 03:30 PM
 
chalupamom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 1,872
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by urklemama
They're expressing it poorly - the ranking of your school is irrelevant - but they have the right idea. Your cultural and educational background matter TREMENDOUSLY.

Interestingly, though, in my experience people without the English skills never ever ever want to homeschool. They want it for their grandchildren, but they want their children to speak English and they know they can't provide that.
Am I understanding correctly that you believe that speaking English is necessary for someone to be well-educated? I'm not sure this is the case at all. What if I'm teaching my kids at home in, say, Farsi and they're also learning English out and about in our community. Why is this bad? Even if I don't use English-based materials, does that disqualify me from obtaining them for my chidrens' benefit? I'm not following this argument at all.

As for cultural and educational background mattering, I disagree. I know many brilliant, nurturing, thorough, excellent homeschoolers who don't have so much as a GED. One woman moved here (wait! English is her third language and she sometimes struggles with it! Yikes!) without graduating from what in her native country would be about 7th grade. And yet her kids are among the best advertisements for homeschooling I've ever seen. In your argument, she shouldn't be HSing at all and yet she's a spectular success. Conversly, an awful lot of my grad school classmates where total idiots, privileged and very dumb.

Anecdotal, I know. Still, I don't think that one's educational accomplishments or level of assimilation in a given culture should disqualify one from HSing or be used to discourage homeschooling. I'm feeling some classicism behing the argument. Am I wrong? I want to be.
chalupamom is offline  
#12 of 50 Old 05-13-2005, 03:36 PM
 
annettemarie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: In the Restricted Section
Posts: 41,722
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Well, exactly. Someone who has limitations- be they language limitations or otherwise- is most likely self-aware enough to know those limitations, and isn't going to try to homeschool.

But, just suppose someone with limitations DOES decide to homeschool. That's her right. Maybe her kids won't be getting the best education in the world (not that they necessarily would in a public school either) but as long as she is jumping through whatever hoops the state has for her, she has the right to homeschool.

Flowers, fairies, gardens, and rainbows-- Seasons of Joy: 10 weeks of crafts, handwork, painting, coloring, circle time, fairy tales, and more!
Check out the blog for family fun, homeschooling, books, simple living, and 6 fabulous children, including twin toddlers

annettemarie is offline  
#13 of 50 Old 05-13-2005, 03:37 PM
 
annettemarie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: In the Restricted Section
Posts: 41,722
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
And I don't consider not speaking English or not going to the "right" school to be a limitation.

Flowers, fairies, gardens, and rainbows-- Seasons of Joy: 10 weeks of crafts, handwork, painting, coloring, circle time, fairy tales, and more!
Check out the blog for family fun, homeschooling, books, simple living, and 6 fabulous children, including twin toddlers

annettemarie is offline  
#14 of 50 Old 05-13-2005, 03:45 PM
 
Greaseball's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Eugene, OR
Posts: 8,764
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Are we supposed to believe ps teachers don't have any limitations at all? They're just people, like us. Their only advantage is that mainstream society trusts them, instead of trusting parents to educate their own children.
Greaseball is offline  
#15 of 50 Old 05-13-2005, 03:45 PM
 
captain optimism's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Good Ship Lollipop
Posts: 7,451
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greaseball
I am a high school dropot who has no knowledge of any part of American history. I can name maybe ten U.S. presidents; I don't know what the Civil War was about or when it ended; I have no idea what is going on in Iraq right now. I am the absolute best teacher my children could ever have. And no, I'm not shipping them off to public school if they want to learn about history!
This might be slightly off topic, but I think the fact that you don't have a great grasp of US history is not because you dropped out of high school. My dh, who has two MA degrees in other subjects, began educating himself on US history in the last few years. He wanted to know more about the people he was studying for his PhD in English, and then later, he got involved in doing research on the history of the civil rights movement. High school history bored him, college history baffled him--it just took a long time to figure out how to put facts in context.

The big advantage to homeschooling, in my way of thinking, is that it can compensate for the bad and boring classes in crucially interesting subjects one might encounter in school. I have been strongly influenced by my recent reading of Lies My Teacher Told Me (I recommend this book to you, Greaseball, don't miss it) and I Won't Learn From You. (Here is an excerpt from that book, by Herb Kohl, which is relevant to what you were saying about Spanish-speaking families choosing to homeschool in Spanish.)

(Right now I think I probably won't homeschool, but every so often I think, "Why should some lucky pro get my fabulous kid, I want to see every aha! moment myself!")

Divorced mom of one awesome boy born 2-3-2003.
captain optimism is offline  
#16 of 50 Old 05-13-2005, 03:49 PM
 
Greaseball's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Eugene, OR
Posts: 8,764
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)

Yeah, I've learned all kinds of things since quitting school...the reason I don't know anything about history is that I don't care! :LOL If I ever want to know the facts, I'll google "Civil War dates" or something.

This gem brought to you by someone who went to the "best" schools in the city...

My dh has that book...
Greaseball is offline  
#17 of 50 Old 05-13-2005, 03:57 PM
 
Ellien C's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: in the middle ages
Posts: 5,582
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greaseball
I doubt they have categories like "boys not suspended for showing up in dresses" or "students allowed to wear 'I love my vagina' pins"...
:

I'm dyin'!

That could be my girl!

Third generation WOHM. I work by choice.
Ellien C is offline  
#18 of 50 Old 05-13-2005, 03:57 PM
 
chalupamom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 1,872
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
And it just occurred to me: I may not have many "limitations" by the definition we're discussing here (top-ranked PS system - top 100, in fact, by many surveys, BS, MA, MBA, English speaking, affluent upbringing, white) but I can't tell you how much more I've learned in the last year just guiding my 4 year old's intellectual development. I've learned more things about the physics of flight, phonics, Degas, honeybees, mummies and golf than I ever could have predicted or even considered.

Now that I know what I'm in for, I can't wait to examine astronomy, Latin, ancient Greece, surrealist literature and all those other things I never managed to get around to. It's clear that I have just as many limitations as others, but people probably don't expect them from me because of my many privileges...I can assure you that appearances are deceiving and the last year shows the truth. I am limited, but woe to anyone who tries to tell me I shouldn't HS.
chalupamom is offline  
#19 of 50 Old 05-13-2005, 04:01 PM
 
chalupamom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 1,872
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greaseball

Yeah, I've learned all kinds of things since quitting school..
And if I recall correctly, leaving secondary school hasn't prevented you from higher ed, either - another important point which shows that alleged "limitations" are seldom such, no matter how much someone might want to cast them as such.
chalupamom is offline  
#20 of 50 Old 05-13-2005, 04:14 PM
 
captain optimism's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Good Ship Lollipop
Posts: 7,451
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greaseball

Yeah, I've learned all kinds of things since quitting school...the reason I don't know anything about history is that I don't care! :LOL If I ever want to know the facts, I'll google "Civil War dates" or something.

This gem brought to you by someone who went to the "best" schools in the city...

My dh has that book...
This is my slightly-too-serious-response to your offhand remark: the reason that we as a culture don't care about history is that we don't have to care. it's privilege. We don't have to know what our country has done and what acts of imperialism or conquest have caused us indirect benefit. Other people know. I learned this in college on my junior year abroad at a party with a group of angry Chileans. It's true that I was only seven in 1973 when the CIA overthrew the legitimately elected president of Chile Salvador Allende, and no one in my family voted for Nixon. But the reason I didn't know all the details of the story was that my family wasn't affected by the coup-de-etat and theirs were.

Just one example.

James Loewen argues that the way we teach US history is not only boring, it totally messes with our understanding of causality. I think it's obvious that memorizing the dates of the civil war would be a colassal waste of brain space. But understanding the causes of the Civil War, talking about the politics of Reconstruction--that's the very heart of a whole bunch of social problems surrounding us, right now.

I have deep ambivalence about homeschooling, but I think it has a lot of potential--which is, I guess, pretty nearly exactly how I feel about school!

Divorced mom of one awesome boy born 2-3-2003.
captain optimism is offline  
#21 of 50 Old 05-13-2005, 04:22 PM
 
Greaseball's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Eugene, OR
Posts: 8,764
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Yep, I go to a university...though people are quick to point out "it's a state U; you couldn't have gotten into anything else!" Probably true...but I'm just not convinced it matters. It's the piece of paper I want; not the name...

I look forward to learning about other kinds of history, on my own terms!
Greaseball is offline  
#22 of 50 Old 05-14-2005, 01:16 AM
 
greensmile's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 109
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I came to California in 7th grade and went to a affluent "ivy league" school town's public school. I was shocked by the low quality of the teaching compred to my east coast public school. Yes,I'm a snob about it. Thank god I went back east after one year, and I was way behind my classmates. So I'm not sure who is being referred to in Ca who isn't "qualified to teach" ( just that concept bothers me), however after living back in Ca for the last 20 yrs. I can surely say the lack of quality (even basic) ed. here has a horrible ripple effect on our citizens. Look at who is our govenor.
Many in CA don't care about history either and the rich white men running the show love that you can't remember (or understand) what happened last weeek. One day when you wake up in your totalitarian country (( or did that already happen )) you won't Know how you got there either!
And about Iraq- Here's one reason you should care: When we first invaded Baghdad civilians were fleeing BUSH'S INVASION OF A SOVREIGN NATION (LAST GUY WHO DID THAT WAS NAMED ADOLF HITLER, BUT WE DON'T KNOW WHO HE WAS EITHER DO WE? AND WHAT ABOUT THE CONGRESSIONAL GIVE- AWAY OF THEIR SOLE CONSTITUTIONAL AUTHORITY TO DECLARE WAR , BUT i DIGRESS)and a truck with an extended family of 17 was hit by our tank fire across the lap of a NINE MONTH'S PREGNANT MOTHER WHO HELD HER TWO YOUNG KIDS ( 2 AND 5YRS.). SHE WATCHED BOTH THEIR HEADS BE BLOWN OFF. THEN HAD TO GO ON AND GIVE BIRTH. So all you ap moms can go to sleep cuddling your own knowing there are too less baby "terrorists ' in the world. And when your kids are the beneficiary of the hate we have sown you will be left bewildered, and find comfort in the thought that they must "hate our freedom"
Ignorance is bliss isn't it?
Kollyfornia Uber Alles!
greensmile is offline  
#23 of 50 Old 05-14-2005, 01:25 AM
 
annettemarie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: In the Restricted Section
Posts: 41,722
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by greensmile
I came to California in 7th grade and went to a affluent "ivy league" school town's public school. I was shocked by the low quality of the teaching compred to my east coast public school. Yes,I'm a snob about it. Thank god I went back east after one year, and I was way behind my classmates. So I'm not sure who is being referred to in Ca who isn't "qualified to teach" ( just that concept bothers me), however after living back in Ca for the last 20 yrs. I can surely say the lack of quality (even basic) ed. here has a horrible ripple effect on our citizens. Look at who is our govenor.
Many in CA don't care about history either and the rich white men running the show love that you can't remember (or understand) what happened last weeek. One day when you wake up in your totalitarian country (( or did that already happen )) you won't Know how you got there either!
And about Iraq- Here's one reason you should care: When we first invaded Baghdad civilians were fleeing BUSH'S INVASION OF A SOVREIGN NATION (LAST GUY WHO DID THAT WAS NAMED ADOLF HITLER, BUT WE DON'T KNOW WHO HE WAS EITHER DO WE? AND WHAT ABOUT THE CONGRESSIONAL GIVE- AWAY OF THEIR SOLE CONSTITUTIONAL AUTHORITY TO DECLARE WAR , BUT i DIGRESS)and a truck with an extended family of 17 was hit by our tank fire across the lap of a NINE MONTH'S PREGNANT MOTHER WHO HELD HER TWO YOUNG KIDS ( 2 AND 5YRS.). SHE WATCHED BOTH THEIR HEADS BE BLOWN OFF. THEN HAD TO GO ON AND GIVE BIRTH. So all you ap moms can go to sleep cuddling your own knowing there are too less baby "terrorists ' in the world. And when your kids are the beneficiary of the hate we have sown you will be left bewildered, and find comfort in the thought that they must "hate our freedom"
Ignorance is bliss isn't it?
Kollyfornia Uber Alles!

Wow. :

Flowers, fairies, gardens, and rainbows-- Seasons of Joy: 10 weeks of crafts, handwork, painting, coloring, circle time, fairy tales, and more!
Check out the blog for family fun, homeschooling, books, simple living, and 6 fabulous children, including twin toddlers

annettemarie is offline  
#24 of 50 Old 05-14-2005, 01:37 AM
 
BusyMommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 9,943
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I guess I don't understand your intent w/that story?

Is it just the people in Ca who don't care about history? Are all high schools teaching in such black and white lines about Iraq? Ours sure aren't. Ours actually read the paper (sure it's a rag ) and use the internet and debate the different politics and perspectives.

I think it doesn't matter if a school is ivy league or Title 1...it's still a family choice.
BusyMommy is offline  
#25 of 50 Old 05-14-2005, 01:39 AM
 
annettemarie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: In the Restricted Section
Posts: 41,722
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by greensmile
So all you ap moms can go to sleep cuddling your own knowing there are too less baby "terrorists ' in the world. And when your kids are the beneficiary of the hate we have sown you will be left bewildered, and find comfort in the thought that they must "hate our freedom"
Ignorance is bliss isn't it?
Kollyfornia Uber Alles!

1. Using all capitols is considered yelling.
2. You might wish to visit our lovely news and current events forum.

Flowers, fairies, gardens, and rainbows-- Seasons of Joy: 10 weeks of crafts, handwork, painting, coloring, circle time, fairy tales, and more!
Check out the blog for family fun, homeschooling, books, simple living, and 6 fabulous children, including twin toddlers

annettemarie is offline  
#26 of 50 Old 05-14-2005, 02:13 AM
 
greensmile's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 109
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Sorry to be "loud", but well behaved women rarely make history, or study it either apparently.I do feel there is a direct connection between how we educate our children and the future of our country and world. my desire for my kids to get accurate and in depth information of the great, not-so-great and in-between actions of our elected officials, in our name, as well as an ability to analyze those events in context, was a major reason we chose to hs. I have five boys and it does make me mad that they are looked at as cannon foder for emperor george's (i'm whispering so he doesn't hear with his post- carnivore ears) world domination scheme. I do feel Americas' attention needs to be gotten, our apathy is fueling world hate.
Another reason we homeschool is to avoid the fragmentation so common in school of subjects. History is not separate from science or art or etc.. We try to weave the tapestry of human experience together for our kids so the can make sense of it. So your suggestion that I go to the news forum doesn't make any sense to me.
I am no newbie to this board or mothering either BTW. I fully realize I was "yelling", how else to get attention? ( I don't complain about all the bouncy smilies that distract my reading) And if you yell back I won't take it personally. I'll be invigorated to know debate still exists.
greensmile is offline  
#27 of 50 Old 05-14-2005, 02:31 AM
 
greensmile's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 109
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My post about why we should care about Iraq, in response to the statement by one member that they don't care about history, and separately that they do't know what is going on in Iraq was to show how there is a human cost to our failure to be active citizens. (one argument made by pro-mandatory public schoolers is that otherwise people will check out of particpating in our democracy, and will have less contact with other types of Americans) An active citizen understands the principles our country was founded on, our civic duties, our nation's history and appplies those to current events. If we don't care about history we get a situation, like today where we lose the right to get information ( the rule against photos of homecoming coffins is a minor example) which becomes a vicious cycle of less information, less caring about events, fewer rights, less democracy. Democracy is not a spectator sport. And history is our soldiers who died and were maimed yesterday.
greensmile is offline  
#28 of 50 Old 05-14-2005, 01:04 PM
 
Greaseball's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Eugene, OR
Posts: 8,764
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
But that's just it - I'm the one who decides what educational subjects I should care about, and I want my kids to decide that for themselves as well. People have also said that since I know nothing about chemistry, I don't understand the very building blocks of life, and that since I don't know higher maths, I don't know the one true international language. Oh well.

If any of you don't know how to bake bread, you are disconnected from the staff of life and food of the gods. Yet how many people worry about their children not wanting to bake bread, or think that they can't be a good homeschooler because they've never made bread?
Greaseball is offline  
#29 of 50 Old 05-14-2005, 04:25 PM
 
annettemarie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: In the Restricted Section
Posts: 41,722
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by greensmile
My post about why we should care about Iraq, in response to the statement by one member that they don't care about history, and separately that they do't know what is going on in Iraq was to show how there is a human cost to our failure to be active citizens. (one argument made by pro-mandatory public schoolers is that otherwise people will check out of particpating in our democracy, and will have less contact with other types of Americans) An active citizen understands the principles our country was founded on, our civic duties, our nation's history and appplies those to current events. If we don't care about history we get a situation, like today where we lose the right to get information ( the rule against photos of homecoming coffins is a minor example) which becomes a vicious cycle of less information, less caring about events, fewer rights, less democracy. Democracy is not a spectator sport. And history is our soldiers who died and were maimed yesterday.
I nust hate to see the homeschooling forum used as a platform for someone to rant about their political beliefs.

Flowers, fairies, gardens, and rainbows-- Seasons of Joy: 10 weeks of crafts, handwork, painting, coloring, circle time, fairy tales, and more!
Check out the blog for family fun, homeschooling, books, simple living, and 6 fabulous children, including twin toddlers

annettemarie is offline  
#30 of 50 Old 05-14-2005, 09:37 PM
 
greensmile's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 109
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Firstly it is sad to see the word "hate" used to shame someone for expresssing their beliefs in a public forum. I enjoy reading other's opinions so I may come to understand the very heart felt reasons for them. I can have my mind opened to new realities and honor them even if I strongly disagree/ don't relate. Secondly homeschooling, like it or not is a very political act as are many of the ways AP families choose to live our lives. We need to understand the history of those who struggled and are still struggling to create and preserve our freedoms to raise our children as we see fit. Lastly I wonder what board response to me stating a whole area of learning, say reading, just didn't concern me . (( The reason Civil War history may be uninteresting to a board member may come from her misunderstanding, possibly from a poor history education that it is about dates. I assume she is not a person of African-American backround to so blithely dismiss it's relevence to her life.))
"If your not outraged, you must not be paying attention. "
greensmile is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off