When do children start coloring - Mothering Forums
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#1 of 24 Old 08-02-2005, 12:37 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Sorry if this is in the wrong spot, but looking at the post about cheap back-to-school supplies made me think of something. At what age can I expect a child to begin being interested in coloring? DS will be one in October. Should I take advantage of the back-to-school sales and buy crayons, etc. now? Or should I wait until next year? I know nothing about child development
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#2 of 24 Old 08-02-2005, 12:47 PM
 
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DD will be one in a few weeks, and is more interested in chewing on crayons than actually colouring or scribbling at this point. And crayon is a PITA to get out of baby teeth, so we're holding off for a few more months with her.

DS started enjoying drawing at about 18 months, with close supervision, and now (almost 3), it's a favorite activity of his.

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#3 of 24 Old 08-02-2005, 01:53 PM
 
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I actually gave ds1 colored pencils (with close supervision, Like sitting in our lap) first as they are less chewable than crayons :LOL I think DH started drawing with him at about a year!

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#4 of 24 Old 08-02-2005, 02:21 PM
 
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Coloring or drawing? I think as soon as kids can hold a crayon, they should be given chances to explore coloring. Coloring books? I don't know. I don't really like them, and neither do my children.

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#5 of 24 Old 08-02-2005, 02:58 PM
 
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My babies started coloring at about a year. They always did better with markers than crayons and pencils (since it doesn't take pressure to make marks). I would definitely take advantage of the sales and get a pack of crayons, markers etc. . . you never know what they will come in handy for. and itisn't lik they expire. they will last for a very long time if stored properly.

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#6 of 24 Old 08-02-2005, 03:05 PM
 
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Both of mine starting coloring at year. I'd stock up!!

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#7 of 24 Old 08-02-2005, 04:11 PM
 
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All of my kids have started between their first and second year. They like coloring books, but rather have the activitie books now that they are older. They ALL love to draw. What is it w/ girls and paper??? It's everywhere around here!!

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#8 of 24 Old 08-02-2005, 04:16 PM
 
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I'd say if you can get the supplies, they won't go unused for long!

My daughter is newly 18 months and she's been scribbling now for a couple months.
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#9 of 24 Old 08-02-2005, 08:15 PM
 
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I'd say about 18 mos., though I started my DD w/ sidewalk chalk a little after a year, and just ventured into crayons about a week ago (bought them on sale). She's stopped putting everything she comes across into her mouth, and so far hasn't tried to eat the crayons.

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#10 of 24 Old 08-02-2005, 08:27 PM
 
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I highly recommend the Stockmar beeswax black crayons. They are chunky enough for my one-year-old to hold, because of the shape, the encourage large motor fill the whole space coloring rather than small motor drawing, the colors are bright and true, they are all natural, and they smell good.

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#11 of 24 Old 08-02-2005, 08:30 PM
 
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My 21 month old has been eating, er, using crayons since about 10 or 11mos. Very supervised at that age, but she wanted to color with big sis and did a pretty good job However, there was the issue of trying to eat them. She's really good with them now, has been for about 4 or 5 months, hasn't even tasted one in probably 2 or 3 months. I also let her use markers, which end up being used for body art when I look away, but that's why we use the washable ones

If your child is very oral, she will try to eat them more, this was my older dd, everything went in that child's mouth, til like age 4.5yrs! Have Fun!!

ETA: They make really large, thick crayons for younger kids, don't break as much, very nice for the little ones
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#12 of 24 Old 08-02-2005, 10:09 PM
 
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Dd1 likes to "write" on her easel, and she likes to experiment with paint -- but coloring (as in coloring books)..? Nope, she has no interest whatsoever. She's 2 1/2.
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#13 of 24 Old 08-02-2005, 10:58 PM
 
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My almost 3 year old has ZERO interest in coloring. I can get her to color for about 60 seconds.

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#14 of 24 Old 08-02-2005, 11:25 PM
 
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Wanted to add, my girls create their own art on blank paper. Older dd uses coloring books once in a while and younger dd will scribble in one now and then. I supply them with implements and paper and the creativity abounds, sometimes on my walls And, of course, we use as much scrap paper as possible
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#15 of 24 Old 08-02-2005, 11:56 PM
 
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I'm reading this looking at a framed finger-painting on my dining room wall that's dated 4/02, which would have made Bailey 14 months when she created it...

I'd grab the crayons. If your son isn't quite ready now, he probably will be soon. Or, as others have suggested, try giving him chalk and a chalkboard or letting him loose on the sidewalk or driveway. Roll out paper and set him free with finger paints and a bunch of interesting implements to use. My SIL keeps wanting to erect a painting venue made of plexiglass out on our fence. The kids can paint away and it will all rinse off with the next rain.
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#16 of 24 Old 08-03-2005, 12:18 AM
 
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I think crayons are good to have from the beginning even if they don't use them for coloring. Crayons are beautiful to look at. They're safe. They are fantastic to sort in to groups. It's fun to read the names of the colors. And they smell good. And you can save all those broken ones for candle making.

I'm not sure if you are buying coloring books for your wee one but I run an art studio for kids and I don't see them ever using them. Well, they start to but loose interest quick. The best way to get kids in to coloring is to color with them. Plain paper is the best.

I have found something pretty cool. It's a book called the anti-coloring book by Susan Striker. They spark the imagination much more than any coloring book can. For instance a page might show an illustration of a the back of a child looking through an empty glass window with a sign that says Toy Shop. The caption below reads, "A new toy store just opened. What kind of toys will you fill this window up with?" So its up to your child to actually draw in the toys. Now that sparks imagination.

Another example is a little girl holding up a blank mirror. The caption reads, "I wonder what I will look like when I'm all grown up?". So again, it's up to your child to draw her idea of what she may look like. It's a real insight into your child's mind.

http://www.susanstriker.com/

Susan has this to say on "What's Wrong with Coloring Books".

http://www.susanstriker.com/wrong.html
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#17 of 24 Old 08-03-2005, 12:58 AM
 
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Washable markers might be a better bet (if you're adventurous). Markers make a bolder, broader line than crayons or colored pencils, and little ones enjoy seeing the fruits of their labor.

That said, my kids all started drawing/coloring/scribbling/ whatever you want to call it before their first birthdays. Although the results were not pretty, they enjoyed it. We usually started by taping a piece of paper to the high chair tray (it's a great way to keep babies occupied while you're making dinner!).

Right now, at 19 months, my youngest is very much into making art. She colors and scribbles on anything she can get her hands on (which has led to some unintentional redecorating- babies & sharpie markers do not mix well!!!!)

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#18 of 24 Old 08-03-2005, 03:23 PM
 
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is there a particularly good finger paint you'd recommend for a 13-month old to use? Something that would do no harm if they got a tiny bit in the mouth through indirect means (finger-to-face-to-other hand-to-mouth kinda thing)? I'd love to supervise some painting with such a wonderfully messy and tactlie medium.
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#19 of 24 Old 08-03-2005, 07:08 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by simple living mama

I have found something pretty cool. It's a book called the anti-coloring book by Susan Striker.
My kids liked these--we've had them since the oldest was little. None of my kids liked regular coloring books, but they all liked to draw/paint, etc. their own designs.

Crayola makes "Twistables" crayons--they're in a plastic case, so they don't get broken like regular crayons. You also don't need to sharpen them--just twist the case and more crayon comes out (like a mechanical pencil.)

For edible (or at least not too nasty if they eat it) finger paint, try this:

1/2 cup cornstarch
2 3/4 cups hot water
1 tablespoon glycerine
food color

mix the cornstarch and water, then cook over low heat until it begins to boil. Remove from heat and add the glycerine and and food color and let cool.

Or use whipped cream and food coloring!

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#20 of 24 Old 08-03-2005, 08:20 PM
 
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My brother and I used to use the anti-coloring book when we were kids

I think you can use some common things to make colors in playdough, etc, such as tumeric, spirulina, beet juice, ... I wouldnt use actual food coloring, but thats just me.
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#21 of 24 Old 08-04-2005, 01:22 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annettemarie
I highly recommend the Stockmar beeswax black crayons. They are chunky enough for my one-year-old to hold, because of the shape, the encourage large motor fill the whole space coloring rather than small motor drawing, the colors are bright and true, they are all natural, and they smell good.
:

They also last a long long time and because of the shape they are much harder to break than regular crayons.

ds has been scribbling happily with his crayons since he was about 10 months old.
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#22 of 24 Old 08-05-2005, 02:49 PM
 
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I second Susan Striker. I have her Young at Art book, which goes from 6 months through toddlers, and it's just wonderful; the ideas she presents are non-pushy, process-not-product, and in tune with AP. She suggests offering a crayon as early as 8 months and emphasizes that tasting and manipulating the crayon are part of the learning process. For much of the day, I keep out a giant pad of drawing paper with a fat, unwrapped crayon on the kitchen floor so that DD can feel free to crawl over and play with them (supervised, of course) when the urge strikes her. For scribbling-age tots, she asserts that markers are not a replacement for crayons; crayon lines' intensity is responsive to pressure and can offer textural illusion.

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#23 of 24 Old 08-05-2005, 06:00 PM
 
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Talia didn't show much interest in them for anything except eating until she was well over a year, closer to 18 months. She was just about two when her interest in them became primarily coloring/drawing, as opposed to eating.

Once, when she was a little shy of 2 years, we went out to eat... the waitress seated us and plopped a packet of crayons down in front of her. I said, "Oh look! H'ors d'ouvres!"

She looked at me verrrry strangely...

:LOL
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#24 of 24 Old 08-07-2005, 11:31 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I bought colored pencils, sidewalk chalk, markers, and crayons. And then DS started his latest teething phase. He won't even try scribbling. It just goes right into his mouth and stays there. Oh well. I'll try again in a week or so. :LOL
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