How are you teaching your child to read? - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 24 Old 10-13-2005, 12:35 AM - Thread Starter
 
MangoMamma's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Toronto
Posts: 261
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I know this is a big question. I'm homeschooling my 4 yr dd and I'm a bit anxious about her falling behind with her reading.After chatting with the mothers at her ballet class I started worrying that I'm not doing anything to teach her how to read. They said they are using phonics and tracing letters to teach their children how to read. At the same time, I want her to enjoy learning so I don't want to force her to learn to read. I want it to be fun. What are your strategies?
MangoMamma is offline  
#2 of 24 Old 10-13-2005, 01:07 AM
 
simple living mama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Rocky Mountains, Southern Colorado
Posts: 2,503
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Carol Narigon (Writer for Home Ed Magazine) answers this so beautifully here. Read this

http://www.homeedmag.com/HEM/186/ndaskcarol.html
simple living mama is offline  
#3 of 24 Old 10-13-2005, 01:19 AM
 
kittywitty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: The Room of Requirement
Posts: 13,493
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
I am also actively trying to teach my 4 yo to read. Not because i think that she is behind, but she is pretty much obsessed on her own accord to do so. She tries to read all of the time and really wants to learn. She is really ready, IMHO. Some people say 4 is too young, but if they are eager and want to, then why not? We just got the Phonics readers system off of ebay (you can get it at scholastic.com at the teacher store if you hs, but it was cheaper on ebay) and my dd is already doing awesome. It uses sight words to recognize and read little by little.

I also am getting the alphatales reading system for my 3 yo son who wants to read, but I wanted to start slower with due to his age. We are also waiting for the BOB books from amazon. I hear great things about them. I also got the phonics workbook for K from singapore math. It is really good, but a bit too slow and my dd is way above it already. We do a letter a week for intense study and writing practice. But I have been doing it alphabetically, and I think that I am going to start doing it in the way that the book: Reading Success has set out. I forget the author, but I got it at the library, and I copied the workpages for my kids and it is very in depth. I got book 1, and we will progress to book 2 later. It is set up for kids with LD or other reading problems, but how it is set up and works seems perfect for young readers. Good luck!

AP Mom to 5 knit.gifhomeschool.giftoddler.gif
 
  

kittywitty is offline  
#4 of 24 Old 10-13-2005, 01:29 AM
 
Milkymommi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Wherever the Wind Blows
Posts: 1,645
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Not all that fancy but after several other failed curriculum attempts we have found WONDERFUL results with Teach Your Child To Read In 100 Easy Lessons. I think when your child is ready it's an amazing tool. I just can't believe how well it works and with just a short 15 minute lesson each day. I whole heartedly recommend it.

Ima to Mizz.Jonas- 14, Isman- 12,Javsar- 9, Nani Gweesa- 4 and Baby Micah born into the Universe sleeping at full term Oct. 19th 2008 and Partner to Abba ~ belly.gif8/2011  Grateful to be Dead  broc1.gif
Milkymommi is offline  
#5 of 24 Old 10-13-2005, 01:41 AM
 
Linda on the move's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: basking in the sunshine
Posts: 10,677
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 67 Post(s)
Neither of my kids were ready to read at 4 and I'm so happy now that I didn't push it. They are 7 and 9 now and are avid readers. Their peers who were forced to read before they were ready now hate books.

but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

Linda on the move is online now  
#6 of 24 Old 10-13-2005, 09:22 AM
 
7kiddosmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: South Texas
Posts: 1,040
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Milkymommi
Not all that fancy but after several other failed curriculum attempts we have found WONDERFUL results with Teach Your Child To Read In 100 Easy Lessons. I think when your child is ready it's an amazing tool. I just can't believe how well it works and with just a short 15 minute lesson each day. I whole heartedly recommend it.
This is what I am using w/ my 6 yr old ds. It was defiently the right choice for him (and me). I needed something that told me exactly what to say and do to help me be more confident. He needed something that didn't have him in one place for too long. I also like it because the child starts sounding out words and reading after the first few lessons. By lesson 13 the child is reading sentences. I like it too because it has tasks for writing the sounds and also reading comprehension.

I will say that my ds was not intrested in reading AT ALL. He just didn't want to do the lessons. I pretty much bribed him into it, now he is excited to do them. I think he was a little scared that it would be hard then he found out that he was actually reading and was very excited.
7kiddosmom is offline  
#7 of 24 Old 10-13-2005, 09:47 AM
 
Citymomx3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: New York City
Posts: 624
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My 4 y/o is learning to read fairly quickly. I try and read a lot to him and we play word and letter games that he initiates. He loves typing out words on an MS Word document in big colorful font. I'll say one and he'll type it and then I'll type one and he'll sound it out. He calls it "doing words", lol. He has Bob books and will bring them to read aloud to me. He writes his name on every art piece. He asks me how to spell something and I tell him - he loves making cards and notes for us. Hangman is his new favorite game. He plays with me and J. He whispers the word in my ear and I tell him how many lines to draw. Then I show him where to write the correct letters and where to put the "miss" letters. We play alphabet games like "i'm going on a picnic" and we have to bring something that starts with the next letter. He is sounding out words up to 5 letters now, knows lots of sight words ("the"), and knows letter blends like "sh", "ch", "th", an "oo". He has moved from CVC words to CCVC and CCVCC. He is starting to understand "silent e" now, too. I think he is right on the verge of true reading.

My girls learned to read at 4 and 3, respectively. My SIL who is using the "reading lesson" approach (with a very popular tool) is having no luck with her 5 y/o. There should be no stress with learning to read - for the parent and for the child. Our unschool approach to reading works very well, I think. Just an idea.

Angela

 

DD(20) Hair Stylist in Manhattan

DD(17) Dancer at the (real) Fame school

DS(13) Martial artist & experiential homeschooler

Citymomx3 is offline  
#8 of 24 Old 10-13-2005, 10:05 AM
 
SagMom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Posts: 4,979
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
About "falling behind," I think you have to ask yourself, "behind WHAT?" (or maybe that's WHOM? ) One of the joys of homeschooling is that kids can develop at their own pace, without the pressure of being compared to the kid sitting next to them.

This subject is a sensitive one for me, as my oldest attended school for a few years. When he wasn't reading when they felt he should be, all kinds of extra practice, drill, remediation and other "help" was used. He went from a preschooler who absolutely ADORED being read to, to a kid who HATED reading. It took years, literally, before he discovered a love of reading.

Dd was not taught to read. We read, often, to her and she began reading on her own at 5, moving on to chapter books and everything else a few months later.

That said, this is what's going on with my 5 y/o. We do these things at his request--it's not something I have mapped out for him.
I'm reading, a LOT, to him. He memorizes some simpler books and "reads" them to me, but he's quick to point out that he's only "'membering in my brain" what the story is, and not reading each word.

He likes to write and will often copy words from a book and then ask me what he wrote. When he asks what a sign says, I tell him. Sometimes I run my finger under words as I read them, but usually he tells me to stop--for some reason that bothers him. We play some oral word games--listing all the words we can think of that start with a certain sound, or finding rhymes. He loves poetry that rhymes, so we read that. We have letter tiles, so sometimes I'll spell out something like, "_at" and he'll put different letters in front of that and ask me what it says.

We don't do these things every day (well, except for reading to him) they're just games that we play because he likes them.

Some kids will read at the age of 4, others will read much later. It's important to me that he's enjoying what he's doing. I'd much rather have a "late" reader who's in love with books than an early one who thinks of it as a chore.

Single Mom to 3 (12, 17 & 21)  luxlove.gif and dog2.gif.

SagMom is offline  
#9 of 24 Old 10-13-2005, 10:48 AM
 
chalupamom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 1,872
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Rest assured, mama, your daughter will read when she's ready.

That said, there is an awful lot you can do to encourage her to regard letters and reading as interesting, fun things.

First, read to her. A lot - and all kinds of things. Fiction, non-fiction, board books, poems, chapter books (even things you think might be a little much for her now - my four year old adored adored adored The Swiss Family Robinson and I'm sure that there were large swaths that he didn't quite get).

We did lots of letter games, too. You know those magnetic boards with the alphabet magnets - I think Melissa and Doug makes them? We played games about sounding out the letters, mixing up the letters to make different words (H-A-T, C-A-T, S-A-T, B-A-T and so on). We made letters out of play clay "ropes", words out of (uncooked) alphabet noodles and so on.

After a while, I started using Explode the Code to help put it all together. We started slow, maybe two or three "questions" at a time. Over time, between the book and the games something "clicked" - I'd say he was maybe three or four months past his fourth birthday when it call came together. Now, at nearly five we're just about to start ETC book 3 and he's reading nicely - nothing too complicated, mind you, but well and happily. He still likes being read to and we're happy to oblige and the real payoff is seeing how thrilled he is to be able to read to his baby sister and play those same letter games with her that we had played with him.
chalupamom is offline  
#10 of 24 Old 10-13-2005, 11:18 AM
 
oldfashionmama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: florida
Posts: 94
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
i teach my kids to read at 4. i have 6 of them and i've always hsed. what i do is buy a $1 alphabet chart and teach them the letters. once they have that mastered we learn the sounds. once they have that mastered we sound out words in bob books and the like.
my kids and i all hated 100 easy lessons. too confusing!
some of my kids love to read and some hate it yet they all learned the same way. go figure!!
oldfashionmama is offline  
#11 of 24 Old 10-13-2005, 12:03 PM
 
raleigh_mom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 748
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm taking a pretty hands-off approach, but the pre-reading things I am doing:

1. Reading to my kids a lot.
2. They like to watch "The Letter Factory" movie by Leap Frog.
3. My 4yo likes to do alphabet activities like puzzles, workbooks, etc and asks for them.

I'm considering giving the kids "The Word Factory" for Christmas, but I really didn't want my oldest to have too much reading input from me until she was five. I want her to spend lots of time learning other things at this age. I"ve asked her if she wants me to teach her to read, and so far she's said no, but I can see it coming soon. She loves to have me help her write letters to G'ma and G'pa and asks me to write out sentences so she can copy them.
raleigh_mom is offline  
#12 of 24 Old 10-13-2005, 01:08 PM
 
LeftField's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Land of well-adjusted weird people
Posts: 2,528
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We have some of the Bob books, because my oldest had an interest in reading at one time and I got a little too excited. We don't use them anymore, because his interest passed and I risked turning him off. I noticed that we didn't really read for pleasure anymore. But that's a tangent.

Anyway, what I didn't like about the Bob books was that, once I read them, he knew what the words said. So, he would "read" it the second time when, in fact, he was simply reciting what I had just read. The easy memorization of the simple text took away from the phonics initiative. Also, the pictures allow you to guess what the words said. I didn't, personally, find them to be very useful.

I liked the Between the Lions book for parents, even though it goes on about school a great deal, because it breaks the stages down, gives great ideas and kind of levels expectations (e.g. what can the typical 4 yo really be expected to do?). It was very comprehensive.

Now, the only thing we're doing to learn reading is we're reading for pleasure and comprhension. After reading Jim Trelease's, "Read-Aloud Handbook" and talking to early readers who were not self-taught, I believe that many children/people come to dislike reading and see it as work or something to suffer through. I want to reinforce the idea that reading is really fun. So, I read lots of books to the kids, from picture books to chpt books, whatever is fun. Additionally, my son's comprehension is pretty high, I think. We talk a lot about the stories, define new words, etc. I think that 99% of people eventually figure out how to break the reading code at some point; then, enjoyment and comprehension is what becomes important.

Just my two cents. HTH!
LeftField is offline  
#13 of 24 Old 10-13-2005, 01:14 PM
 
PancakeGoddess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 5,351
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Personally, the one thing I do that may be a bit unusual is I don't teach letter names until much later. I think it makes way more sense to learn letter sounds first.

I don't think there's anything wrong with not wanting your kid to read *very* late, because I've seen kids get very stuck when they learn late. We just don't live in a vacuum, and they do compare themselves to others.

But please understand - when I say late, I'm talking about 10-11 years old. Reading at 8 or 9 is developmentally fine, and not unusual among very intelligent homeschooled kids. IMO Four is simply too young for some brains to manage reading.

If the OPs daughter finds it enjoyable, I recommend the games in the books by Peggy Kaye. I think some of her ideas are really fantastic.

Also, Carol's Home-ed Mag answer is great (she's a friend, lucky me).
PancakeGoddess is offline  
#14 of 24 Old 10-13-2005, 02:51 PM
 
LeftField's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Land of well-adjusted weird people
Posts: 2,528
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by benjalo
IMO Four is simply too young for some brains to manage reading.
I'm not snarking. I don't want my son's brain to just manage reading. I want it to independently "get it" at his personal point of readiness and I would bet that most 4yos aren't close to that point.
LeftField is offline  
#15 of 24 Old 10-13-2005, 03:01 PM
 
oldfashionmama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: florida
Posts: 94
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
i agree about the bob books. what i do with them is i never read them aloud. i let the child do all the reading , sounding it out, so he feels accomplished that he read A BOOK!! lol lol then i put them away for the next child.
oldfashionmama is offline  
#16 of 24 Old 10-13-2005, 04:43 PM
 
SagMom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Posts: 4,979
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeftField
Anyway, what I didn't like about the Bob books was that, once I read them, he knew what the words said. So, he would "read" it the second time when, in fact, he was simply reciting what I had just read.
Interestingly, I suspect that this is how my dd learned to read. We didn't have any "Bob" books, but I'd read her favorite books so many times that she had some memorized. I'd then hear her "reading" them to herself. Eventually, I think that she connected each written word on the page to the words she'd memorized, and figured out how to read that way. We never did phonics lessons with her. My ds hates "Bob" books and other easy readers, but for kids who like them, memorizing may not be such a bad thing.

Single Mom to 3 (12, 17 & 21)  luxlove.gif and dog2.gif.

SagMom is offline  
#17 of 24 Old 10-13-2005, 04:58 PM
 
HippoMommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Following Ava in So. Cal.
Posts: 183
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My DD is 3 1/2 (4/02 b'day) and she is actively asking me to teach her to read. I read to her every day, all kinds of things. We are using the Five In a Row curriculum, mostly to come up with fun ideas for activities related to great stories (I'm not creative in that way, and we're having fun with the books). We put some simple "word family" words on the wall (tab, cab, jab, crab, tab) and she is reading them each day. We write them (she traces them) and read them as we trace them. We also use the starfall.com website to reinforce letter sounds. Occasionally she does some worksheets (we have them around for her brother) and coloring book-type activities related to letters. We also have an ABC bingo game and the Melissa & Doug capital & lowercase letters puzzle. We use all of it to the extent that she wants to do so.

She is really excited about learning to read right now. If she gets tired of it, I will stop.
HippoMommy is offline  
#18 of 24 Old 10-13-2005, 05:29 PM
 
MamaMonica's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: lalalala life goes on
Posts: 13,000
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Learn to Read in 100 easy Lessons worked for us because the stories are really short and letters big. We didn't do any exercises, she just read the stories, which build up in difficulty.

Reading to them is the best! I think this is how dd learned to read, and the 100 lessons book was good practice.

Being right is not always fair, but being fair is always right
MamaMonica is offline  
#19 of 24 Old 10-18-2005, 12:02 AM
 
oyemicanto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: in a mess
Posts: 1,323
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm "teaching" my 4 y.o. DD to read by:

1. having books in baskets available in each room of the house,

2. reading aloud to her everyday whenever she wants

3. creating a "language rich" environment through storytelling, CDs with stories and music (right now her favorite is Ladysmith Black Mombazo The Gift of the Tortoise ), making up silly songs

4. reading poetry

5. reading the newspaper and books so that she sees me reading

6. cooking together using recipes

I truly believe that a home filled with language through books and music and storytelling will be the best way for her to develop a love of reading. That will be her base, and then as she is interested and when she asks me, I point out letters and their sounds. I will go totally at her pace, not mine.
oyemicanto is offline  
#20 of 24 Old 10-18-2005, 12:14 AM
 
boysrus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: In an octopus' garden in the shade
Posts: 5,145
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I dont teach my kids to read. I didnt teach them how to walk, crawl or talk. I dont teach them to read either.
I read to them alot. Anything and everything. I leave books everywhere. My older guys have both learned to read around 5 or 6. My eight year old has been reading at an adult level since about six months after he learned to read. My 7 year old is devouring chapter books. I dont feel it is a skill i need to teach. We never did phonics or lessons in really any way. We did the BOB books, we read them a few times, but they are so boring that we stopped. My littlest guy is doing a lot of coputer games, Jump Start and whatnot, he is 4 and is starting to get it
boysrus is offline  
#21 of 24 Old 10-18-2005, 12:30 AM
 
USAmma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Arizona
Posts: 18,763
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
If she's not interested on her own at that age, I would not initiate it. If she's really, really wanting to read, just read to her and pick certain words and sound them out. Get Bob Books, point out words on cereal boxes and signs. If she wants to read, exposure will let her do that. If she's not ready yet, wait a year or two.

7yo: "Mom,I know which man is on a quarter and which on is on a nickel. They both have ponytails, but one man has a collar and the other man is naked. The naked man was our first president."
 
USAmma is offline  
#22 of 24 Old 10-18-2005, 09:27 AM
 
oldfashionmama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: florida
Posts: 94
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
i agree that we don't "teach" our kids to read but rather "guide" them along. funny how we all choose different routes but they all learn to read!
oldfashionmama is offline  
#23 of 24 Old 10-18-2005, 04:13 PM
 
NatureMommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Southern California
Posts: 155
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My oldest two boys attended public school, one through part of third grade, and one through part of first grade. It was my experience that although they both "learned" to read in K and 1st, it was not until they were aroung seven and a half years old that they really understood reading and did it comfortably. My middle child had developed such a phobia about reading (at age 6) that he would throw books if he thought I expected him to read them. That whole first year of homeschooling was complete devoid of any expectation of him "reading" Then, a couple months before his 8th birthday, I saw the same "click" that I saw in his big brother at that age. He now comfortably reads books on a 4th or 5th grade level (the current favorite being Calvin and Hobbs).

My 4-year-old is my first "from scratch" homeschooler, and I worried about teaching him to read. He loves doing his "school" work, but knowing how much my older ones struggled in school to read at an early age, I am being way laid back with him. When he wants he works in Ready for the Code, a pre-primer for Explode the Code, to teach him the alphabet sounds. He also has some shape and color books picked up at Wal-mart for 99 cents. And he is surrounded by people who read.

I was given a copy of 100 Easy Lessons and it looks straight forward enough, but I have not started using it, and probably won't for a while.

My house was clean this morning,
Sorry you missed it.
NatureMommy is offline  
#24 of 24 Old 10-18-2005, 10:00 PM
 
SRHS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Rockland, ME
Posts: 553
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I TRIED to teach my now 8y/o son to read with phonics when he was 6....now that I am wiser, I have learned that this is not how he learns best, so I have gone to letting him read to me, if he gets to a word he doesn't know, I say it for him (he is a visual learner and so it is important for him to see and hear it right the first time, or he will learn it wrong), then I write it down and we go back over it later, I also let him read anything he wants and let him read silently and while his outloud reading is atrocious (probably my fault and trying to teach him part to whole, vs whole to part like his brain processes) I don't MAKE him do it, but he often asks to read to me...probably because I tell him the words that give him trouble. I don't make a big deal out of it, he just looks at me when he is tumped and I say the word and we go on...even if it is many words in a row. I also spend a lot of time reading to him and his younger brother, who I think is "memorizing" his favorite books and then reading them to himself. I don't sound things out for him, I just say the word....knowing that he will learn on his own at his own pace....hey, at least I've learned something too!!! Poor Zac...wonder how many other "mistakes" I made with him????? ...HOwever, now that I am letting him learn at his own pace and his own way, he is reading much much better than he used to....don't know what grade level or anything like that, he is just reading better than he ever has...and that's all that matters!!!
SRHS is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off