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#31 of 58 Old 03-20-2006, 04:04 PM
 
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I was not educated in the US, so have no direct experience of either public or private schools here. I was privately educated in the UK, as was my brother (classical education, ended up with a MA in Classics from Oxford) and sister (PhD in History, Cambridge and London Universities), I was educated at a ballet school and majored in Dance at London University. I frankly hated school for the most part, but I was at a boarding school and wasn't particularly interested in academics. But there was no really bullying, the teachers were strict and we were taught in a very traditional way. I survived, I learned -- more than I realized at the time. Looking back it really wasn't too terrible. I had no bad experiences, except having to leave home for school the first day of term, but as soon as I got through the gates and saw my friends, I was fine. I certainly wouldn't send my children to boarding school though and put them through the separation. How did my mother do it?

I am currently not a homeschooler, but am considering it down the path. I want my children to learn some of the things I and my siblings did, things that I know they aren't going to be exposed to here in the US, like Latin (I wish bro was in this country to help out, my Latin is very rusty), British history. All of my children love school and have always been treated with respect by both their fellow students and teachers. I guess they some of the lucky ones.

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"If you find from your own experience that something is a fact and it contradicts what some authority has written down, then you must abandon the authority and base your reasoning on your own findings"~ Leonardo da Vinci

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#32 of 58 Old 03-20-2006, 06:57 PM
 
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I went to public school when I was little, then I was homeschooled. That is why I homeschool my kids.
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#33 of 58 Old 03-20-2006, 07:45 PM
 
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I had bad experiences in both public and private schools - especially in private ones - but that had little if anything to do with deciding to homeschool. My experiences wouldn't have been at all the kind of experiences my son would have had in the schools I found for him. The main reason we homeschooled was because of the bad experiences he ended up having in private schools - and I came across homeschooling while researching the alternatives. Lillian
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#34 of 58 Old 03-20-2006, 10:45 PM
 
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Well overall I had an OK time in both public and private schools, I had good days and bad day, didn't love it or hate it. I was somewhat popular. I can't say I learned anything in school really because I was far more concerned with my friends and stuff though--my mom always called it the "teen cult". I got into a *lot* of trouble as a preteen and my mom pulled me out to homeschool me and it was probably the best thing my mom ever did for me.

My fun homeschool experience (I really enjoyed being hs'ed) is what led me to hs my kids, no so much my public/private school experience.

Marilyn,psych RN. Homeschooling mom to Taylor (12) and Lauryn (8)
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#35 of 58 Old 03-21-2006, 11:42 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Itlbokay
Recently, my Ds was made to stand in the hall for 30 minutes as punishment for reading in class - granted at the time the teacher was explaining the busy work - his defense was that he already new the material and was very discreetly trying to finish a really good part of the book. Since I saw both sides I just let it go - but it burns me up that he is not being challenged.

I Had to write 50 sentences, "I will not read in class". How silly is THAT ONE!? I still remember the whole conversation as if it happend yesterday.

I am currently trying to work up the nerve to pull my children out of Public School. It took my oldest to completly loose it before I got the courage, please don't put if off if you are just scared that you may not be able to do it.I wish you all the best in your choices.

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#36 of 58 Old 03-21-2006, 02:26 PM
 
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For the most part, I liked school well enough. I managed to find the fine line between being picked on and picking on others. I occasionally fell into the "picked on" category, but I had it mild compared to some friends of mine. I did feel like school was a humongous waste of my time, and I felt that I wasn't really getting much out of it. I was able to jump through all the academic hoops with relative ease, was tracked into AP/gifted groups and classes, and took most of my classes with the same kids. I assume that I was a "bright" child that wasn't quite "gifted", as I was able to fit in well AND turn the academic tricks to pave a pretty smooth path in public school. The gifted classes were just icing on the cake--fun and rewarding.

I also LOVED sports and was good at them. I pretty much went to high school to play soccer. It was the brightest spot in my schol experience. I also had an easy/healthy/loving/supportive home life, so that lessened the stress of school a lot, I am sure.

However, there are many negative incidents that do stick out for me.
*My 7th grade math teacher who signed my yearbook, "Nice smile, weak math mind" --gee, thanks.
*The bodybuilding, steroid-using track coach who shamelessly hit on a teammate of mine (she was afraid of him and we never left her alone with him).
*This same coach would buy alcohol for some parties. And attend.
*He also packed the JV track team (including my little sister) into the bed of his pickup and drove them to a track meet 25 minutes away because the bus was late (this was 1994, so it was a big no-no then like now).
*The daily anxiety and shame of trying to find a seat on the bus to school as the younger kid who nobody would slide over for.
*Sexual harassment by classmates.
*Inappropriate sexual comments by one teacher in particular.
*Being treated without respect simply because I was a child.
*Reading Beowulf out loud in 12th grade English class stanza by stanza. It took weeks (this was not an AP class--I didn't like the teacher that taught the AP class so opted out that year and got her B-level class anyway). I read a book/magazine in my seat in the back of the room and caught up to where we were as a class just in time to read my lines. This teacher told me that I would not make it in college because of my inattentive behavior in class. I reminded her that I had scored an A+ on all the tests/quizzes on the Beowulf stuff and we had been doing the same thing for weeks. I added that I thought it was a credit to me that I could read "Seventeen" in class and still ace her tests. Surprisingly I didn't get in trouble for that.

I am sure there are more, but I have to go change a poopy diaper. This has been an interesting thread. I don't want my kids to have to change who they are to fit into school social structures, and I don't want them to waste their childhoods doing things that have little to no value to them.

Stacy-- Wife to my DH, mom to three: noodle girl:, Lego boy , little guy :
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#37 of 58 Old 03-21-2006, 04:51 PM
 
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I went to public and private schools. They each sucked in their own ways, and definately played a role in my decision to keep my kids out of school at all costs. In fact, I decided in seventh grade that I would homeschool my children, because that's when I first heard of homeschooling and found out that it was possible.

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
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#38 of 58 Old 03-21-2006, 04:58 PM
 
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I'm not consciously homeschooling because of my school experiences but I'm guessing they do figure in a bit.

School wasn't bad. I felt it was, as many others have said, a colossal waste of time. I was bored a lot. I daydreamed a LOT. In 8th and 9th grade I was so bored I created an entire fantasy world, complete with characters, time line, genealogy going back dozens of generations (for my main character), maps, place names and stories. I still have some of it around I guess I can thank school for that, Before that I just daydreamed a lot, doodled a lot, got yelled at for not paying attention a lot.

I was picked on. I was fat all through school (was? : ) and got teased a lot. Nothing severe ever but I haven’t forgotten the kids who walked down the halls after me making noises, stepping on my shoes or calling me names and putting worms in my hair. Or the high school teacher who told me I should lose weight (which was worse because I genuinely liked him). I wasn’t ever beat up but I was threatened with a beating once. I wasn’t popular in the least and cried a lot because I had very few friends. FAR fewer than my sheltered, unsocialized, homeschooled daughter has (uh, that’s sarcasm in case anyone can’t tell )

I’m shy. Very shy. I don’t like public speaking. For some reason, teachers seem to think it’s important to make kids stand in front of a class and deliver reports on a regular basis. It didn’t help to make me less shy. Probably the reverse. I remember wishing I would die and wouldn’t have to go to school, or at least break a leg or something. Really, I can still remember the intense, stomach wrenching fear I would get from the anticipation of that. I’m just not a public speaker and never will be and I don’t see the point of all that torture.

I was considered gifted (per testing) but was bored with school so didn’t make an effort most of the time. There weren’t any gifted programs in my school (very “good” school district in a well off town) or maybe I didn’t qualify because I wasn’t applying myself. I did my homework at the last minute (before school sometimes – or in study hall before the class) and mostly got B’s. I put effort into things that were interesting but for the most part, it was boring. A good teacher could inspire me to study something I might not otherwise but, sad to say, there weren’t a lot of them. I had very few bad teachers too. Most of them were just mediocre I guess.

I do think of one thing in regards to my kid’s education. After 12 years (well, plus daycare, nursery and K) of school I was so burnt out it wasn’t funny. I was DONE with being told what to do by others. I really liked college but at that point I just didn’t enjoy it as much as I should have. I dropped out after my freshman year and took awhile to get back. Finally finished and then, after 3 weeks of grad school I realized I just couldn’t do it anymore and dropped out. I actually left in the middle of a class I hope if my kids decide to go to college they will be able to enjoy it a lot more, having not been burnt out on school before then.
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#39 of 58 Old 03-21-2006, 07:15 PM
 
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I went to public school. Elementary and Junior High were my designated school and highschool my parents enrolled me in as a choice school as the one I was assigned to go to had a really bad rep. I would say I had an overal positive experience in school. Nothing too extreme, good or bad. I would say I enjoyed elementary school the best, I stayed there from kindergarten unitl 6th grade so I had a lot of friends along the way. I would say my favorite teacher was for 3rd grade. She was hippy-ish and alternative, she made learning interesting and fun, we also had a lot of field trips that year which is very important at this age, IMO. I would say my worse teacher was 5th grade, evil mean witch lady! She was a control freak and spent the majority of the time disciplining and thus the kids thrived on that and acted out even more. I remember clearly when she wouldn't let me go use the bathroom and I really had to go, I walked out and she was furiated and I ended up in the princiapals office and later had a meeting with him, the teacher and my parents. Really, to deny a bodily function because you want to controll everything is horrible. I was the president of the school in 6th grade so that was fun to spend my last year there helping make decisions and *running* the school. I probably learned more from that than the other years combined.

Junior high was okay, a lot of new friends, classes, teachers. It was kinda a joke though as it's such a social time and to have to sit still and learn 6+ different subjects a day just gets old. I would say i learned a lot about friends and life socially then, not much from school although I did enjoy band and was consistently first chair flute.

High school, ahhh, I wish I hadn't bothered. I mean a diploma is nice and all but there are other ways to get to college. I was just following the motions and doing what I had to to pass. The rest of the time was spent with friends, boys, at the smoking corner. I partied a lot and enjoyed these years but I was ready to grow up and move on with life. I probably would have been better off getting my ged at 16, getting a job and starting community college.

Our decision to homeschool does have to do with the fact that neither I or DH feel as though we learned very much while in school, we both agree that our children should be free to learn how and what they desire and that learning is a natural thing that does not require institutionalization. I am so lucky and thankful that we are both on the same page as far as learning and educating our children... I do think it's because we have realized how many years we wasted and how much more potential there could have been had we been in control of our education.

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#40 of 58 Old 03-21-2006, 07:49 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Itlbokay
Recently, my Ds was made to stand in the hall for 30 minutes as punishment for reading in class - granted at the time the teacher was explaining the busy work - his defense was that he already new the material and was very discreetly trying to finish a really good part of the book. Since I saw both sides I just let it go - but it burns me up that he is not being challenged.
Once you get into homeschooling, I think it becomes harder and harder to see the side that feels it's okay to treat another person like that. In that incident, your son was exercising his own judgement and common sense but was not being treated like a full-fledged person. He won't be treated that way in college or anywhere else in life. He might end up with annoying or unreasonable or even bullying bosses somewhere along the line, but nobody will have the right to humiliate and "punish" him like that. I can't imagine that it would do much good to try to tell a teacher that punishment isn't okay - especially in a case of someone making harmless personal choices about his own ways of spending time - and that's a lot of the problem. Lillian
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#41 of 58 Old 03-21-2006, 11:16 PM
 
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Hi everyone. My decision to homeschool my daughter was made because of observing HER school situation (she's in first grade, and we'll start homeschooling after this academic year is over). But when I started reading about homeschooling and considering it, I couldn't help but think about my own experience and how different things might have been for me if it weren't for my bad school experiences.

I went to elite private schools until 8th grade when I was kicked out for misbehaving. Then I went to public school for a few months. Then I was sent to a Fundamental Baptist (shudder) boarding school for high school.

I don't want to write too much, because I don't want to bore you all, so I'll try to sum up each experience quickly. Private school: Too much pressure to excel, too much competition, expectations or perfection, no room for mistakes. (I was adopted at 8 after my mother was killed, and had emotional problems that were never addressed, but were exhibited in school. The school would not tolerate this.) Public school: Fear, boredom, waste of time. Fundamental Baptist boarding school: Extremely traumatizing, too much to sum up quickly. If anyone wants to know, send me a private message.

Anyway, I started noticing that when my daughter "plays school," she often yells at her dolls and talks to them in a really humiliating and patronizing way. We talk to our daughter as an equal, so I was shocked. I also noticed that the things she focused on were lining them up and scolding them. I go and eat lunch with my daughter and two nieces at least once a week. The first time I went, the cafeteria monster cam up and told me that I could not have my nieces sit with me, because it would get "out of hand." She made my nieces get up from the table and go sit somewhere else. They were totally confused as to who they should listen to. I complained to the pricipal and the matter was resolved, but I still have a distaste for the whole situation. I think that rules should make sense. They shouldn't be made because something MIGHT get out of hand. That's just stupid.

I also didn't like the things my daughter would get in trouble for: fidgeting, playing with things in her desk, talking to her friends, not listening, etc. I think a 5,6,7, etc. year old should be doing all of those things. I don't see why she should be criticized for normal behavior that she can't help.

I don't like that a first grader has two hours of homework. I don't like that a first grader has to run laps for P.E. I don't like that she has to run extra laps if her MOTHER forgets to send her to school with P.E. shoes. I don't like that kids get awards for being on time to school, something totally out of their control.

Most of all, I don't like that my daughter is slowly starting to hate anything associated with learning.

Well, so much for making that short! I could say so much more!
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#42 of 58 Old 03-22-2006, 11:16 AM
 
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I don't like that a first grader has two hours of homework. I don't like that a first grader has to run laps for P.E. I don't like that she has to run extra laps if her MOTHER forgets to send her to school with P.E. shoes. I don't like that kids get awards for being on time to school, something totally out of their control.
OMG, the homework situation is absolutely *appalling*. I read an article in Child Magazine a few years ago about how in the elementary grades, particularly K-4, a child should never have more than 10 minutes of homework per grade per evening (so a 3rd grader should never have more than 30 minutes). In first grade, my niece had up to 4 hours of homework every evening! She would have to come home from school, change out of her uniform and work on homework, get a break for dinner, go to bed, and wake up at 6 am to finish her homework from the night before and get ready for the next day. With such an obscene amount of work, is it any wonder that she didn't want to pay attention when she was actually in school?! This year in 3rd grade she has a *minimum* of 3 hours a night. It's absolutely disgusting.

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
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#43 of 58 Old 03-22-2006, 11:40 AM
 
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HEllo! Well, my experience in public school was probably average. Some parts I liked and some I didn't. I disliked high school the most, and I always hated how cruel kids could become when in a crowd. I never joined in with teasing others, and I was always for the underdog....(still am) But, That is NOT why I chose to homeschool my kids. I homeschool because it occured to me that I worked so hard for my kids in the beginning of life, that I couldn't see "handing" them over to a school for the best parts of their life. So, I enjoy being a family - and consider this a family journey and I am so so glad I did it!! (but, the School system now a days do make me shudder, and I am glad they are here with me.... )
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#44 of 58 Old 03-22-2006, 12:10 PM
 
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Through my elementary school years, I was enthusiastic, bright, quick and giggly. I got my work done and then talked with my neighbor, and was reprimanded...(um, socialization?!)

In high school, I quickly realized that the grades weren't anything real. I got A's, but we didn't have discussions about anything. We weren't thinking. We weren't encouraged to think. I couldn't handle that--I became depressed and angry. My peers were thinking about what I thought were very trivial things, meanwhile I knew that the Amazon was being bulldozed to raise cattle for McDonald's hamburgers. This was the 80's, Reagan was the president and I didn't really fit in socially.

Still, I was on the tennis team, debate team and in a school play. But, I was so bored!

My kids are almost never bored. And, when they are they figure out ways that are meaningful to them to fill that space. They are in charge of themselves in real ways that I didn't learn until I was an adult. I don't think kids can learn that in school. The school is in charge and then people wonder why kids don't take responsibility for themselves and why they don't make wise choices. They haven't really had experience making choices have they?

My kids have very rich, deep friendships with kids in our homeschool group. These are friendships that transcend age. You don't get that in school, instead kids are taught about divisions: grade, tracking, class,etc. "Celebrate Diversity!"? Never is it celebrated. The diverse are divided from one another and not embraced.

School is just so rife with ways that separate the self from the self. It is the arbitor of thought and behavior. How can we not expect kids to come out confused and angry and having to spend a decade to find themselves and know themselves?

Impossible.:

Crunchy check list:  2 homebirths (one accidental UC!), co-slept, no CIO, cloth diapers, home/un school, raw milk drinker (!) I am a walking cliche!! I even blog and knit...
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#45 of 58 Old 03-22-2006, 12:27 PM
 
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For people like me, whose child is not yet in school, I think it's inevitable that one's own school experience is a major determinant in their decision to homeschool their children. That's because the decision is being made before the DC has their own school experiences from which to draw for making the decision.

My choice for DS is based in part on undesirable things I experienced in PS, like how one needed to be disingenuous and hardened to navigate peer interactions well, the boredom - even in a middle class suburban "good" district, the cruelty. I am as ashamed remembering my experiences as a bully as I am at my experiences being bullied - both are emblazened in my brain, and those thoughts pop up sometimes out of nowhere making me regretful. I wish that on no-one. Not every day or every teacher was bad, but there were just too many bad or useless experiences that I had, and that I suspect DS would have in PS, to subject him to that. As a PP said also, I am spending so much effort on DS, why would I suddenly hand over his precious mind and spirit to someone else in a setting that seems to be suboptimal?

DH has no strong feelings about PS, but he does resent a few things, like not being able to take engine repair classes because just taking them - even if he earned an A+ in the classes - would have lowered his class ranking and made it harder for him to get into college, so his parents discouraged it. What kind of backward system is THAT?

Bottom line: I know I can provide so much better than conventional PSing based on my experiences, and DS deserves better if I can deliver it. It isn't my experience with bad teachers (although they exist) or mean students (they also exist) that would be the biggest problem in my eyes, but a system which, when working at its BEST (i.e., all good teachers and angelic children), still suffers from shortcomings that I know about because I was in a PS like the one where DS would go... problems like having to work at someone else's pace on topics that someone else deemed important, arbitrary age-segregation, external time commitments required of DS - between school preparation, attendance and homework - that would erode crucially important family autonomy and time, and limit DS's ability to participate in personally important activities that don't fall within the scope of what the PS deems important.

aran .......... Mr. aran .......... DS1 .......... DS2
BIL Oct. 1961 - Jun. 2009 taken by cancer
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#46 of 58 Old 03-22-2006, 12:38 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks everyone for responding. It's really interesting reading.
You know even if I had a relatively good ps experience, i probably would still end up homeschooling. I just think it fits our style.

And oh my gosh on 2 hours of homework for a first grader??? wtf?
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#47 of 58 Old 03-22-2006, 03:46 PM
 
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I had a good public school experience. I was picked on a little, but I brushed it off. I went to a very small school in a small town. I actually wouldn't change my educational experience. However, my dh had a horrible experience with being picked on and not fitting in.

We are choosing to homeschool because 1- I don't think my child would do well in ps and I don't want that special part of her to be squashed out of her to make her conform! 2- I don't think kindergartners should have desks or homework or be yelled at to stand quietly in line or any of the other crap that happens.

I've also been working in the public schools here for the last 2 months, and having talked to the teachers and seen school today (and in this area) up close- there is no way I want my kid there!

Laura, Mama to Mya 7/02, Ian 6/07 and Anna 8/09
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#48 of 58 Old 03-22-2006, 07:04 PM
 
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Originally Posted by papayapetunia
I don't like that she has to run extra laps if her MOTHER forgets to send her to school with P.E. shoes. I don't like that kids get awards for being on time to school, something totally out of their control.

Most of all, I don't like that my daughter is slowly starting to hate anything associated with learning.

Well, so much for making that short! I could say so much more!
Oh my gosh, that is one of the reasons I'm pulling DD! I am sooooo tired of her getting punished for something I did. If I get her to school late 3 times in a quarter, she gets a detention. She's 10, how does she control when I get her to school??? If I forget to send her gym clothes, she has to write lines (well, she remembers her own gym clothes now, but that was when she was littler).

The education thing...yup, DD now hates math. Because she doesn't understand this year and thinks that we are "repeating" 4th grade math because she is dumb (her words) Her teacher yells at her for not paying attention if she asks questions, so she comes home and her dad explains it to her. She is barely getting it, so I said we'd try the same stuff again next year but make it more fun, and now she thinks she is stupid. Science is now boring because they've done mass and matter and light waves 3 years in a row. Thank goodness she is *really* excited about learning biology next year, so she doesn't think *all* science is bad.

My public school experience was horrible. I could write volumes...but I am now a total people pleaser, have very little self esteem, and do my best to never stand out or be "different". Yup, that's how I finally got kids to quit picking on me in school. It's now a hard habit to break--the biggest for me is that I always wear somewhat fashionable neutral colored clothing. Boring, wallflower, but not ugly enough to be noticed clothing. I can't stand wearing bright colors or unfashionable clothing. I also try to downplay my huge vocabulary and intelligence.

Yeah, school is great. If you are an average kid who likes looking and acting like everyone else, that is.

Mom to Liz (14) and Dillon (3) and Mitchell FINALLY born 7/11/10!
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#49 of 58 Old 03-22-2006, 07:46 PM
 
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I go and eat lunch with my daughter and two nieces at least once a week. The first time I went, the cafeteria monster cam up and told me that I could not have my nieces sit with me, because it would get "out of hand." She made my nieces get up from the table and go sit somewhere else. They were totally confused as to who they should listen to. I complained to the pricipal and the matter was resolved, but I still have a distaste for the whole situation. I think that rules should make sense. They shouldn't be made because something MIGHT get out of hand. That's just stupid.
Okay, I'm going to be wondering about this, so I have to ask - WHAT might get out of hand? I can't even figure out what she might have been referring to. - Lillian
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#50 of 58 Old 03-22-2006, 07:50 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eilonwy
In first grade, my niece had up to 4 hours of homework every evening! She would have to come home from school, change out of her uniform and work on homework, get a break for dinner, go to bed, and wake up at 6 am to finish her homework from the night before and get ready for the next day. With such an obscene amount of work, is it any wonder that she didn't want to pay attention when she was actually in school?! This year in 3rd grade she has a *minimum* of 3 hours a night. It's absolutely disgusting.
Ryanna, this is so disturbing! Is that a public school? What geographical area is it in? That's just so abusive and crippling. - Lillian
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#51 of 58 Old 03-22-2006, 07:59 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Lillian J


Ryanna, this is so disturbing! Is that a public school? What geographical area is it in? That's just so abusive and crippling. - Lillian
When I hear of hours of homework I scratch my head trying to think what kind? Worksheets, presentations, book reports?
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#52 of 58 Old 03-22-2006, 08:10 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Itlbokay
When I hear of hours of homework I scratch my head trying to think what kind? Worksheets, presentations, book reports?
Honestly, I do too. DD has never had more than an hour, and she's in 4th grade! Most of the time it's a half hour or so, usually consisting of a worksheet and some spelling practice. Sometimes another half hour or so of studying if she has a test the next day. But her school believes in doing most schoolwork...at school

Soooo looking forward to this hs journey...

Mom to Liz (14) and Dillon (3) and Mitchell FINALLY born 7/11/10!
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#53 of 58 Old 03-22-2006, 08:48 PM
 
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My daughter usually has about three worksheets and out-loud reading to do every night. There are usually two writing/spelling worksheets and one math worksheet. She also has to write sentences for all of her spelling words. Sometimes the teacher sends home the kids' in-school workbooks for them to go through and correct with their parents. For the reading, they have to read a whole book or a chapter if they're reading chapter books. She can do the work on her own, for the most part. But I had to watch my niece for a week, who is in the same grade at the same school, and she has a harder time with the work. Now that was a tough situation. Making a child sit and read out loud to you when they are totally frustrated with reading. That's a sure way to make a kid hate reading forever. And making a child who hates school come up with sentences all on her own. It was sad.
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#54 of 58 Old 03-22-2006, 10:03 PM
 
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My Catholic grade school experience was okay. For the most part I was a happy kid (until my parents divorced) and then I managed to be a trouble maker....but I never felt unhappy until high school.

There were times literally where I almost tried to kill myself because I was being ridiculed so badly for a tiny overbite and small breasts. It was horrible. I remember crying and crying and crying. These weren't my close friends but the bullies in the class (usually the most popular kids). It wasn't that I wasn't popular amongst my own group...I just didn't look "perfect" like the popular girls. The worst was when a girl drew up a comic book about me....it was horrible. She passed it all around my history class and everyone was laughing at me and I didn't know why (you know like a scene from a movie). It was horrible. The book then got passed around the halls and so many people saw it. I left school that year because I threatened to my parents that I would kill myself if they made me return.

As far as grades go, I did well in grade school. I was usually on honor roll. After the first semester of public high school, I went downhill to Cs & Ds. I went on to Catholic high school for two years and I did much better there both socially and academically.

I hated my high school science teacher. He was downright abusive.
I hated other teachers as well. I switched schools 3 times in the 4 years of high school. Kids are so mean. I don't want my children to be mean to other people. I raise them as such already.

Consciously mothering 3 girls and 2 boys
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#55 of 58 Old 03-22-2006, 10:34 PM
 
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YES.

A BIG YES for me.
Without going into some long sob story about my wretched childhood, let's just say that I really, really felt a kinship with the following fictional characters:

1. Carrie White from Stephen King's Carrie (but without the nifty psychic powers),

2. "Piggy" from Lord of the Flies minus the excess weight, glasses, and asthma,

3. Meg Murry from A Wrinkle in Time, specifically because of the belligerence and anger.

When I told one of my friends about this, he gave the argument that what was true for X (me) was not necessarily going to be true for Y (my daughter), but my response is that it's not an X and Y situation, but more like X and child-of-X, and that she and I are quite similar. In short, I have very little reason to believe school would be much better for her.

Add to this that both she and I learn things in a way which is significantly different enough to prove a teacher's nightmare, and we have our happy homeschooling story right here.

Bottom line, I don't want her individuality beaten out of her like mine was. I don't want her to be ashamed of who she is or put her in a situation where she has to feel as if she has to hide her likes and dislikes in order to fit in. It's just not worth it -- fitting in is the cheapest of cheap goals.

And that's just the "socialization" part -- don't get me started on the equally- or more-important academic issues.


Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetpeasmom
I was just curious as to what your experience was when you were a child if you were in public schools, or even private schools. Did your experience play a factor in your decision to homeschool?

Was talking with MIL yesterday and well she's a former teacher, don't think she's too happy about us hs but oh well. Anyways we just briefly talking and I said I hated school as a kid, and she said well sometimes a bad teacher can make you hate it. I said that wasn't the first thing that came to mind, it was the kids. Constant teasing, bullying, got sick of gum being put in my hair, being pushed off the seats on the bus, laughed at if I did well in class and showed and interest in learning, sitting alone at lunch time, not fitting in because i didn't have the latest style of guess jeans, having "friends" that were just using you because you were smart and therefore cheated off of you etc.. I told her all this and she was like oh? I like yeah there were bad teachers also, but a few goods ones too but it's the other stuff that strikes at me as to why i hated my school years.
Because of all this, I really feel I didn't do well in school as I could have. As all this wonderful "socialization" i received was a major distraction. I mean going home everyday, crying alone in my room well just plain sucked.

I feel that my experience totally played a major factor in our decision to hs.

So anyways, i was just wondering for us what was your experience? Did anyone have a totally good experience while in public school?
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#56 of 58 Old 03-23-2006, 04:13 AM
 
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My schooling experience was very good. Probably nearly as good as it could be. I very much enjoyed school. However, that's not really saying a whole lot for my education. I was an excellent student. I was also a very Passive learner, as a product of schools.

I don't think that a school environment is the ideal educational setting. Since I don't have to resort to using it for my kids, I won't.
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#57 of 58 Old 03-23-2006, 10:03 AM
 
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I found school boring, boring, boring. I knew how to read before kindergarten, so instead of sitting in the kindergarten classroom with my class, I went to the "resource room" to work with a tutor/reading specialist (?) for half of my schoolday. In first grade, I went to a second grade reading class, and then I just went to third grade after that. I was still bored, though.

In middle school, I was picked on incessantly because my parents did not buy me clothes from The Limited and The Gap. Yep, I was the "dork" wearing clothes from Bradlees or Ames. And worst of all, my sneakers said "New Fitness" or something on them instead of "Reebok." *gasp!*

By high school, the kids had mostly grown out of that stuff, and I had friends again. I was in the Drama Club, and I did enjoy that a lot. I took all advanced placement classes, and found some of them fun. I had a couple of great teachers, a couple of awful ones, and most were mediocre. I got good grades, but I was one of those kids who could read over the material once and get an A, so it wasn't because I worked hard.

All in all, I'd say my "schooling" was a waste of 12 years of my life that I could have spent doing better things that would have actually prepared me for life. I did go to college for a year, and did enjoy that.

Anyway, that's pretty much the main reason we homeschool, but of course there are about a million other little reasons as well.
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#58 of 58 Old 03-23-2006, 11:40 PM
 
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I was bored in school and graduated early. I didn't care for the social aspects, although it wasn't a horrible experience. I wish I had joined one of the (academic/athletic/arts) clubs, I think this would have helped me be more involved and busy.

I decided to look into hs'ing after visiting this forum a few years ago. I was curious about posts on classical education. I borrowed an old copy of TWTM from the library and was hooked. I knew, even if I didn't end up hs'ing my children that my research would be make me a better parent.

Been quietly hanging around here for over 10 years.  

 

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