Story of the world- pics or just read alound? - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

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#31 of 50 Old 06-23-2006, 03:22 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by flyingspaghettimama
Ok, I just can't help it - but what IF your child is just weird? I mean, they like odd things, they reenact strange scenarios, are very sensitive, they like reading a lot (but only Garfield) yet you strongly suspect they are of average intelligence by all conventional IQ testing methodologies. What if there is no excuse for the weirdness? Can't that be cool, in of itself? What shall I say to her, "Oh, honey, you're just an indigo child, that's why you're different. Now can you wait to play 'pegaunidonkey's colossal church experience' until we leave the restaurant?"

What IF they are Tibits, in other words? And there is no Tibit testing methodology? Well, then you're just hosed as they are neither cheetah nor snail, but pegaunidonkeys named Tibit. Some kids feel different, and that's the shakes, because their parents haven't repressed it out of them yet. Maybe many children would be different and gifted if they weren't always pressured to be so dang normal, whatever that means. I still feel different, and I just find other adults who are also OK with their quirks and funky selves.

I like your approach, quaz. And, for the record, not that anyone cares, but I think SOTW is very poorly written, although a nice concept in essence. How many times can an author use the word, "that?" Some strong editing assistance was needed and not provided.
LOL!!!!

Oh, I think I'm one of those pegaunidonkeys!!
Majored in the hard sciences, but best in class in English. Logical, but emotional. Hobbies are things like drawing, writing... quite different than the work I'd do.

I never felt different as in out of place, but know I don't fit neatly in any of those lovely personality tests.

My oldest, I'm afraid may fall in one of these scenarios... where she IS very sensitive, always pretending, loves books, and builds cool structures... but no 'academic' interests. I believe she falls in that 'gifted' range, but not sure she will 'test' there if we go the school route... I'm afraid she'll be be highly misunderstood, so i'm considering homeschooling for higher levels.

Amazing child, and fits that category of pegaunidonkey.
So, we do what fits her, and we make it up as we go.


Oh, and yah, dd will be 4 in September.

Tammy
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#32 of 50 Old 06-23-2006, 05:35 PM
 
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Getting back to the original controversy ... what "mature content" is in Story of the World that makes it inappropriate for a 3 year old? Coarse language, graphic violence, booze & tattoos? Inquiring minds want to know!
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#33 of 50 Old 06-23-2006, 05:48 PM
 
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I've actually never seen that book, but it sounded to me like the implication was that the story would be hard to follow for younger children, not that it was too graphic for young children.

As to what a child can follow, I wouldn't presume to know what any child could or could not follow or comprehend at any given age.

What I was attempting for ferret out was whether some of you feel that it is inappropriate to push or stretch a child to a point that s/he is capable of reaching if the child himself is not the one insisting on the harder content. Is 'above level' content only appropriate if it is actively sought out by the child himself or can it be appropriate for a parent to introduce challenging material to a child with the knowledge that the child could do it if s/he tried?
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#34 of 50 Old 06-23-2006, 06:16 PM
 
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or can it be appropriate for a parent to introduce challenging material to a child with the knowledge that the child could do it if s/he tried?
I don't think that was the mind set of the op. I think it was more 'will this interest the child'. I think if the child threw the book into the fireplace or displayed simerlar means of saying 'I don't like this' that the book would be quickly shelved.
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#35 of 50 Old 06-23-2006, 06:21 PM
 
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Originally Posted by lckrause
Getting back to the original controversy ... what "mature content" is in Story of the World that makes it inappropriate for a 3 year old? Coarse language, graphic violence, booze & tattoos? Inquiring minds want to know!
Well, I don't know about you, but I save stilted writing and boring stories until at least 3rd grade. Sort of like, "Should I read him Moby Dick now at age three and kill his love of reading; or wait until age nine?"

But I'm a low-culture snob, who cares what I think?
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#36 of 50 Old 06-23-2006, 07:54 PM
 
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Originally Posted by joandsarah77
I don't think that was the mind set of the op. I think it was more 'will this interest the child'. I think if the child threw the book into the fireplace or displayed simerlar means of saying 'I don't like this' that the book would be quickly shelved.
I agree that seems to be where the OP was going, but the thread kind of morphed into a question as to whether parents were pushing inappropriate (content/interest wise) material onto young children. That's where I have the question.

Say, if a kid is interested in the story line of a Jules Verne story and can follow it, but it is a bit of a challenge for her to read it, would it be wrong to ask her to try reading it? Or, if a 3 y/o can generally understand SOTW (the book at the subject of this thread) but has a bit of trouble with following it at times and might better understand a less mature book, is it wrong for the parent to choose to read SOTW to said child in the interests of stretching the child a bit beyond his/her comfort zone?

Further, if a book that seems inappropriate for most little kids is appropriate for some little kids due to a difference in brain wiring or precociouness, or whatever, is it still inappropriate for that child's parent to choose that book?

I'm really not trying to start an argument; I want to find that balance btwn adequate challenging and excessive pushing.
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#37 of 50 Old 06-23-2006, 08:39 PM
 
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if a kid is interested in the story line of a Jules Verne story and can follow it, but it is a bit of a challenge for her to read it, would it be wrong to ask her to try reading it?
Well if she wants to read it I guess she would and if she started and found it too hard I guess she would stop? I don't really get the question. I don't think the parent has to ask her to try reading it, if the child is intrested in it, she would naturaly try and read it I think. it's not like a book report for school or anything. If she was intrested but obvoisly to hard for her to read for herself why couldn't the parent just read it aloud to her? I think if the parent knows the book is too hard and is trying to encourage a reluctent child to read the book knowing it will be a challange then there likly to cause that child to hate reading.
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#38 of 50 Old 06-23-2006, 11:45 PM
 
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Originally Posted by joandsarah77
I think if the parent knows the book is too hard and is trying to encourage a reluctent child to read the book knowing it will be a challange then there likly to cause that child to hate reading.
I think that if a child is only presented with reading material that is at or below their comfort level that they'll react negatively when they're presented with reading material that is challenging for them, and they won't achieve anything like their potential as readers. I'd rather see my children look at new, "out of range" material as a challenge that they can manage than something outrageous and "too hard."

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#39 of 50 Old 06-23-2006, 11:47 PM
 
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Originally Posted by flyingspaghettimama
Well, I don't know about you, but I save stilted writing and boring stories until at least 3rd grade. Sort of like, "Should I read him Moby Dick now at age three and kill his love of reading; or wait until age nine?"
I don't think that Moby Dick is boring, but that might be me; I've met lots of people who do find it boring, and recently read a graphic novel in which the more boring aspects of Moby Dick were a running joke. As to the writing in SotW, I don't think it's all that bad, but I did make it through two and a half "Left Behind" books before I got too sick to read on.

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#40 of 50 Old 06-24-2006, 12:54 AM
 
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Originally Posted by eilonwy
I don't think that Moby Dick is boring, but that might be me; I've met lots of people who do find it boring, and recently read a graphic novel in which the more boring aspects of Moby Dick were a running joke. As to the writing in SotW, I don't think it's all that bad, but I did make it through two and a half "Left Behind" books before I got too sick to read on.
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#41 of 50 Old 06-24-2006, 01:01 AM
 
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Originally Posted by eilonwy
I don't think that Moby Dick is boring, but that might be me; I've met lots of people who do find it boring, and recently read a graphic novel in which the more boring aspects of Moby Dick were a running joke. As to the writing in SotW, I don't think it's all that bad, but I did make it through two and a half "Left Behind" books before I got too sick to read on.
Ah. I see. You're a masochist. Well, to each their own. Why read a Left Behind book when you can just read a Chick tract?
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#42 of 50 Old 06-24-2006, 06:07 AM
 
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I think that if a child is only presented with reading material that is at or below their comfort level that they'll react negatively when they're presented with reading material that is challenging for them, and they won't achieve anything like their potential as readers. I'd rather see my children look at new, "out of range" material as a challenge that they can manage than something outrageous and "too hard."
What I ment was if the book is there on the table then the child is as free to read that as anything else. But if it's obvously too hard I don't think it helps any if the parent keeps on to the child to try and read it.
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#43 of 50 Old 06-24-2006, 10:27 AM
 
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wow, those are hilarious... but they don't talk about the end of the world enough.

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
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#44 of 50 Old 06-24-2006, 12:17 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Ya know, I'm still quite amazed at how a simple little question illicited 3 pages of responses.


Since I'm the original poster... the mind set was... my dd has shown some interest in some world culture/history lately, and I was looking for something to help expose her to that. If she shows an interest in something, I like to expose her to it, to see if she has any interest there she wants to explore. (kinda like art... no interest, no interest, coloring is boring mommy, no interest, and then WHAM!!!! can't keep her from drawing if I tried... the key was just to insure she had the supplies available and seeing if she had any interest) I'd heard of SOTW, and never have seen it, so was trying to see if the book would be a fit or not. Doesn't sound like it.


We've had a hard time finding books for her lately, b/c she wants a long story, but pictures peak her imagination. We've found a few books, but it's definitely harder, b/c she is almost between phases.


As for question that came up for finding a balance, but not pushing... I leave a variety of books out. DD loves her disney books and regularly brings me those, but will also bring magic school bus, magic tree house... she has brought me 100+ page books of Little Women or Peter Pan. It's pretty obvious if the book is keeping her interest or not... she won't let me stop reading if she is enjoying it.... so long peter pan book, I had to read. Little women, we stopped on chapter six. Magic school house, I have to read the whole thing.

With my oldest, if she doesn't want to do something, she generally tells us, or makes it obvious.

Tammy
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#45 of 50 Old 06-24-2006, 01:50 PM
 
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Originally Posted by quaz
... she has brought me 100+ page books of Little Women or Peter Pan. It's pretty obvious if the book is keeping her interest or not... she won't let me stop reading if she is enjoying it.... so long peter pan book, I had to read. Little women, we stopped on chapter six. Magic school house, I have to read the whole thing.
Tammy, this is interesting because I had a child who was at a similar stage, once upon a time, and I thought the issue was the presence or absence of illustrations too at first. It turned out not to be, though. What it was was the complexity of the language and its subject matter. She was happy to listen to novels like "Sophie's Snail", "All-of-a-Kind Family" and "A Bear Called Paddington" (which do have a few pen & ink illustrations, but I read them to her while she listened with eyes closed in bed) where the language was not much more complex than Magic School House books and the chapters are more like linked stories than a single over-riding plot. Where there is continual development of the story from chapter to chapter, the connections are very simple. Unlike, say, Peter Pan and Little Women.

Personally, I'd put my money on the complexity of the language and the complexity of the story, rather than on the illustrations, as being the issue.

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#46 of 50 Old 06-24-2006, 02:58 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Tammy, this is interesting because I had a child who was at a similar stage, once upon a time, and I thought the issue was the presence or absence of illustrations too at first. It turned out not to be, though. What it was was the complexity of the language and its subject matter. She was happy to listen to novels like "Sophie's Snail", "All-of-a-Kind Family" and "A Bear Called Paddington" (which do have a few pen & ink illustrations, but I read them to her while she listened with eyes closed in bed) where the language was not much more complex than Magic School House books and the chapters are more like linked stories than a single over-riding plot. Where there is continual development of the story from chapter to chapter, the connections are very simple. Unlike, say, Peter Pan and Little Women.

Personally, I'd put my money on the complexity of the language and the complexity of the story, rather than on the illustrations, as being the issue.

Miranda
I think it might be both... b/c with peter pan .. fairly complex, but she wouldn't let me stop reading.... but I do consider little women or anne of greene gables to be more sophisticated. (the books were from the same series... an illustrated abridged classic... so they both were more complex, but I just consider the other two a bit more compex) At the same time.... a book without a single pictures.... NO interest no matter how easy the story.

So with her, it really is getting the right combination.
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#47 of 50 Old 06-24-2006, 05:18 PM
 
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It's interesting to me, too, because while BeanBean will listen to (and follow) long, complex stories the pictues often seem to distract him. If I show him a picture from our edition of The Secret Garden, for example, he'll want to stop and look at all of the pictuers rather than continue reading. If I read to him, I have to do all of the reading at once and let him look at the pictures afterwards.

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#48 of 50 Old 06-24-2006, 05:39 PM
 
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Originally Posted by deeporgarten
Actually it DOES have pictures.
Sotw does not have pictures - their is an occasional line drawing, for example they have couple of examples of chinese pioctograms. THe workbook however, has some coloring pages, etc...
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#49 of 50 Old 06-24-2006, 05:39 PM
 
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one thing that is nice about the sotw work book is she recommends literature that corresponds with the topic...
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#50 of 50 Old 06-24-2006, 07:44 PM
 
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I just like having something about which I can find books later. So I'll read a chapter of SotW, then go to the library and find other books on the same topic (or, if the topic is not one which I deem appropriate and/or necessary, a concurrent event/topic).

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