Question: Why homeschool preschool children? - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 205 Old 06-28-2006, 12:23 PM - Thread Starter
 
eloquence's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: judgmental wench
Posts: 1,278
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Just a question? Why do people homeschool preschool children? I don't want to interrupt the support thread but the whole concept has me.....
eloquence is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#2 of 205 Old 06-28-2006, 01:46 PM
 
SweetMamaMe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 88
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
In our case, it's what our daughter needs. She is fascinated by words, numbers, music, and taught herself to read at 2. She's now really into addition and math concepts. She's happiest when she has an almost constant stream of learning. She absorbs so much, so quickly, and always wants to know more, explore, etc. So, we just facilitate what we can. We don't necessarily homeschool her with a curriculum, because I cannot find one that really fits her, we just take her lead and do what we can. I don't know about other people, but I don't see anything wrong with it if that is what they choose for their family.
SweetMamaMe is offline  
#3 of 205 Old 06-28-2006, 01:46 PM
 
moominmamma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: In the middle of nowhere, at the centre of everything.
Posts: 5,800
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 95 Post(s)
Speaking as someone who hasn't homeschooled her preschoolers, I think there are a number of reasons why people do. None of them really appeal to me, but here they are, as I see them:
  • They may use the time as a special one-on-one bonding time apart from siblings and/or from the flow of daily chaos.
  • Their children may take delight in the scheduled nature of home preschool activities.
  • They feel the social or family pressure of enrolling their children in preschool and feel that doing something at home instead arms them against the critics.
  • They may be treating it as a 'test run' of Real Homeschooling, to find out whether it is something that works for them before they make the momentous decision to wave the big yellow bus on by.
  • They may be philosophically committed to the use of a curriculum and have a child who is ready for a Kindergarten-level curriculum earlier than age 5.
  • The parent may simply enjoy the process of creating and administering a learning plan with their children.
Miranda

Mountain mama to three great kids and one great grown-up

moominmamma is online now  
#4 of 205 Old 06-28-2006, 01:47 PM
 
mamabohl's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Newport News, VA, USA
Posts: 1,310
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
we don't actually do school for our preschooler but I'm still reading/joining the thread just for fun activities and because we plan on homeschooling eventually.

Genie, mama to T (4/02), I (10/04) and T (7/09)
 
 
 

mamabohl is offline  
#5 of 205 Old 06-28-2006, 01:50 PM
 
moominmamma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: In the middle of nowhere, at the centre of everything.
Posts: 5,800
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 95 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by SweetMamaMe
In our case, it's what our daughter needs. She is fascinated by words, numbers, music, and taught herself to read at 2. She's now really into addition and math concepts.
See, I too had a child who taught herself to read at a very young age, and to me that was reason not to start "homepreschooling" -- because she was obviously learning just great without an adult-initiated approach, and because, being literate so young, she could challenge herself to learn new things by reading about them.

So I think parental perspectives and choices still play a large role, even when a child is very advanced and an insatiable learner.

Miranda

Mountain mama to three great kids and one great grown-up

moominmamma is online now  
#6 of 205 Old 06-28-2006, 02:19 PM
 
SweetMamaMe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 88
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Of course parental perspectives and choices play a role! For my daughter, who does appear to be very advanced, whatever, she still needs help. There are some things that she is mentally ready for, but otherwise not, and wants to learn so bad. That's where I come in, and try to help her as best as I can. I don't know if it's homeschooling, or not, but it's what we do.
SweetMamaMe is offline  
#7 of 205 Old 06-28-2006, 02:20 PM
 
True Blue's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Hampton Roads, VA
Posts: 4,626
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
:

Amy, USCG wife and homeschooling, ebfing, homebirthing Mama to M (8), L (6), L (2.5)
True Blue is offline  
#8 of 205 Old 06-28-2006, 02:27 PM
 
SweetMamaMe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 88
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
SweetMamaMe is offline  
#9 of 205 Old 06-28-2006, 03:37 PM
 
Roar's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 4,419
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by moominmamma
See, I too had a child who taught herself to read at a very young age, and to me that was reason not to start "homepreschooling" -- because she was obviously learning just great without an adult-initiated approach, and because, being literate so young, she could challenge herself to learn new things by reading about them.

So I think parental perspectives and choices still play a large role, even when a child is very advanced and an insatiable learner.

Miranda
Yes, I was just about to post the same thing. We also had an early self taught reader and we didn't do preschool academics at all and I'm glad.
Roar is offline  
#10 of 205 Old 06-28-2006, 03:38 PM
 
Roar's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 4,419
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by SweetMamaMe
Of course parental perspectives and choices play a role! For my daughter, who does appear to be very advanced, whatever, she still needs help. There are some things that she is mentally ready for, but otherwise not, and wants to learn so bad. That's where I come in, and try to help her as best as I can. I don't know if it's homeschooling, or not, but it's what we do.
But, if she isn't ready for something how can you help? I don't really understand how that works. One of my biggest goals as a homeschooler is not to get in the way. If it gets to the point where I'm needing to "help" the child in order for him to be able to learn I feel like I'm getting in the way.
Roar is offline  
#11 of 205 Old 06-28-2006, 03:57 PM
 
SweetMamaMe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 88
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I don't know how to explain it, other than to say her brain is advanced and wants to do things her body doesn't quite know how to handle. Somebody help me word this better!! For instance, she just wants to know everything, but there is a process and sometimes she gets impatient with the process. Her brain thinks and processes like a 1st or 2nd grader sometimes, but she's still a 2.75 year old with limited motor skills. She used to be behind in motor skills and that made for a very frustrated child. Somehow, she got caught up on her motor skills, and then some, and can handle these instances better. She's also a perfectionist and is very hard on herself. It takes us to let her know that it's okay if it's not perfect, but that is so hard for her. She was constantly wanting to know how to spell words, etc. and we came up with a game to teach her how to sound out words. Now she's a very happy child when it comes to reading. Some things she taught herself, some things we help her with. I understand where you are coming from, though, but I think it's just the differences in the children and the parents. We all meet our children's needs according to their needs, I think.
SweetMamaMe is offline  
#12 of 205 Old 06-28-2006, 04:00 PM
 
loraxc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: In the Truffula Trees
Posts: 4,388
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Well, in our case, in large part because I would like DD to be be in preschool but we can't afford it.

My DD needs stuff to do. When she gets bored, her wheels spin, and we find ourselves battling. She loves it when I say, "Hey, DD, I have a fun activity for us to do!"

I think you may be thinking of "home preschooling" as all about sitting down and drilling letters--it is much broader than that. Today we made and played with cornstarch "goop" and sorted glass marbles. Later she will help me sort and fold laundry and I will probably get out the paints and collage materials. I consider all of this part of home preschooling.

grateful mother to DD, 1/04, and DS, 2/08

loraxc is offline  
#13 of 205 Old 06-28-2006, 04:02 PM
 
loraxc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: In the Truffula Trees
Posts: 4,388
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
If it gets to the point where I'm needing to "help" the child in order for him to be able to learn I feel like I'm getting in the way.
Really? I don't know if I'm understanding you. Are you saying that if, for instance, your child needed specific help learning to read you would feel you were getting in the way?

grateful mother to DD, 1/04, and DS, 2/08

loraxc is offline  
#14 of 205 Old 06-28-2006, 04:08 PM
 
Wolfmeis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Pugetopolis
Posts: 3,292
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We homeschooled our children at preschool age because yes, they were quite precocious and it was a nice way to engage them in a tangible way. Further, we are big proponents of Montessori, and that cycle begins at age 3.

We weren't preparing for "real homeschooling." We were homeschooling. We've gone a little eclectic in the years since then, but the Montessori method is still the major vehicle from ages 3-6 'round here.
Wolfmeis is offline  
#15 of 205 Old 06-28-2006, 04:17 PM
 
Roar's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 4,419
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by loraxc
Really? I don't know if I'm understanding you. Are you saying that if, for instance, your child needed specific help learning to read you would feel you were getting in the way?
I was specifically addressing my experience with a gifted preschool age child. I understand what the poster is saying about the asychrony of these kids. It is very easy to step in and do for, to eliminate frustrations, to spoon feed them...but I think a lot is lost in that process. I'm struck again and again that the ways the child finds to work on something are often more interesting and more meaningful than anything the adult will come up with. And, my position may be different because at this point I see my son's greatest strength as a learner is his independence and self motivation. I think that some of that emerged because his learning wasn't programmed by others early on.
Roar is offline  
#16 of 205 Old 06-28-2006, 04:25 PM
 
SweetMamaMe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 88
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
No, I think you were specifically asking about my child, which I answered. No spoon feeding here, just obviously, a different child from your own.
SweetMamaMe is offline  
#17 of 205 Old 06-28-2006, 04:32 PM
Dar
 
Dar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: St. Louis, MO
Posts: 11,249
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by loraxc
Today we made and played with cornstarch "goop" and sorted glass marbles. Later she will help me sort and fold laundry and I will probably get out the paints and collage materials. I consider all of this part of home preschooling.
And I consider it simply parenting...

dar

 
fambedsingle1.gifSingle mom to Rain (1/93) , grad student, and world traveler earth.gif


  

Dar is offline  
#18 of 205 Old 06-28-2006, 04:34 PM
 
SweetMamaMe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 88
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Amen.
SweetMamaMe is offline  
#19 of 205 Old 06-28-2006, 04:45 PM
 
Roar's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 4,419
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by SweetMamaMe
No, I think you were specifically asking about my child, which I answered. No spoon feeding here, just obviously, a different child from your own.
Of course they are different. All kids are different. I don't think though that it fully explains the difference in approaches. My child had very significant motor delays by the way and I'm hard pressed to think you'd find a lot more asychronous kid out there.
Roar is offline  
#20 of 205 Old 06-28-2006, 04:49 PM
 
SweetMamaMe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 88
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I guess I'm unclear why it matters that our approaches are different.
SweetMamaMe is offline  
#21 of 205 Old 06-28-2006, 05:07 PM
 
loraxc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: In the Truffula Trees
Posts: 4,388
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by loraxc
Today we made and played with cornstarch "goop" and sorted glass marbles. Later she will help me sort and fold laundry and I will probably get out the paints and collage materials. I consider all of this part of home preschooling.

And I consider it simply parenting...

dar
I'm honestly not trying to be snarky, but what is your point here?

grateful mother to DD, 1/04, and DS, 2/08

loraxc is offline  
#22 of 205 Old 06-28-2006, 05:08 PM
 
paxye's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Quebec, Canada
Posts: 2,836
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We unschool, which is an extention/part of my parenting... I follow the boys interests and help them learn more about it which is what I will be doing when they hit school age... nothing will change...
So I personnally believe that we are already "homeschooling" even though we have not hit school age...

So I believe that I am homeschooling/unschooling preschoolers... kwim?

 
~paxye~
Mama to Xavier (July 02) , Colin (Sept 04), Khéna(Nov 06) & Wilhelmina (Jan 10)
paxye is offline  
#23 of 205 Old 06-28-2006, 05:41 PM
 
quaz's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 1,047
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dar
And I consider it simply parenting...

dar

AH, but for many parents out there, that isn't parenting anymore. Sad, but true. I see so many parents that simply run their child from item to item to item... preschool, swim/dance, playdates... whatever. While you may consider that simply parenting, that is not the norm for many parents out there with preschoolers.


So, I consider myself 'homeschooling preschool'.... well, kinda.

My oldest will be 4 and my youngest is 2. My reasons correspond more to this...

They feel the social or family pressure of enrolling their children in preschool and feel that doing something at home instead arms them against the critics.

They may be treating it as a 'test run' of Real Homeschooling, to find out whether it is something that works for them before they make the momentous decision to wave the big yellow bus on by.


The first one isn't realllllly correct for me... everyone where I live does preschool. We don't. Hard to believe some of the comments I've gotten about it. For me it is easier at times to simply say we do preschool items at home... it's not said b/c I feel pressure, but to simply get folks to stop being so moronic with their comments.

On the second, yah... it is a bit of a test run.

Now, having said that I homeschool preschool... well, I don't in the conventional sense... and yah, it really falls more as just parenting.... except the difference is I've researched a bunch about homeschooling, and other items.


DD is bright. No interest in academic items. No interset in formal curriculum. She'd be bored to tears and tell me within 60 seconds if I tried to teach her to read...... so we don't do that. Lots of art, crafts, trips, free play.... very eclectic, kinda unschooling, and some montessori thrown in.

Is it parenting or preschooling at home??

The way I look at it.... it's parenting, BUT with the way society is and the push on going to school at a young age.... these days, doing those items... it's considered homepreschooling.


So, OP... I think the thing is that just as 'homeschooling' is so varied... so is homepreschooling. I think some think, WHAT? Why on earth would you be doing preschool and focusing on all this academic stuff when your kid is 3?? Reality is, homepreschooling.... doesn't necessarily look like that for many people.... and yah, it's what many would have considered parenting just 30 years ago.... but today, parenting too often doesn't look like that.


HTH.

Tammy
quaz is offline  
#24 of 205 Old 06-28-2006, 06:01 PM
 
loraxc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: In the Truffula Trees
Posts: 4,388
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
: Totally.

Does it really matter what it's called, anyway? I *just* joined the homeschooling preschoolers thread. I have been doing "stuff" like that for a long time without considering it home preschooling, but I want to get a little more organized and get new ideas as DD gets older. It stimulates me, supports me and gives me ideas to interact with others about it.

Honestly, the thread could probably just as easily be called "Learning Activities for Preschoolers." YK? :

grateful mother to DD, 1/04, and DS, 2/08

loraxc is offline  
#25 of 205 Old 06-28-2006, 06:02 PM
 
mamapajama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: The Emerald City
Posts: 643
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
well, all my friends' children go to preschool and I got tired of saying my child wasn't going, so I started saying I was homeschooling. I felt like me saying my child wasn't doing preschool was not accurate. He is doing preschool. He's just doing it at home. He's playing and learning, and socializing, and experiencing life.

And I love the preschool support thread because it gives me fun ideas for things to do with my children.

, mama to DS(7/)22/02) DS (8/14/04) , and an angel (3/10/10)nursing a broken heart...loving my boys.
mamapajama is offline  
#26 of 205 Old 06-28-2006, 06:04 PM
 
USAmma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Arizona
Posts: 18,573
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My dd was advanced and showing very early interest in reading and other academic things. It was natural for me to find the time/resources to satisfy that need to learn. I actually put her in preschool for a few mos because I thought she needed a break from me and the new baby. Then she told me she missed me when she was at school. She did not do well at all there and was more stressed than ever. So was I, getting her ready for school.

Some people use preschool at home as a nice way to bond. Sometimes having it in your mind that you will sit down with your child and play with blocks and teach him colors at the same time, is really nice. Or singing songs together, or whatever. Because even as a SAHM I find it difficult to make myself sit and actually play with my kids when there's so much other stuff to do. Preschool offers good quality one on one time. If you already have that time with your kids then there's probably no need to schedule it. But with a new baby at home, that preschool time was very valuable to dd1 and I, when baby was sleeping.

7yo: "Mom,I know which man is on a quarter and which on is on a nickel. They both have ponytails, but one man has a collar and the other man is naked. The naked man was our first president."
 
USAmma is offline  
#27 of 205 Old 06-28-2006, 06:27 PM
 
RedWine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 2,899
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Here's how I homeschool my preschooler...

I strive to meet her intellectual, sensory, physical, and emotional needs by introducing her to various things and creating an atmosphere in which she can thrive. This is the same thing a lot of you do, regardless of your child's age. Therefore, we consider ourselves homeschoolers. However, my daughter is 3 1/2 -- she thus fits into the so-called preschool category.

What kinds of things do we do? A bit of everything. "Typical" preschool stuff, like playing with goop, blowing paint across paper with straws, exploring water and sand, spending as much time as we can outdoors, etc. And then there's helping her with her reading -- which she asks for, and she's advanced for her age. She also has this thing for anatomy, so we also spend an hour or so a day looking at anatomy programs on the web and on a CD. She now knows more about the human body (organs, muscles, skeleton and nerves) than I ever did (and I took Anatomy at Harvard Medical School!). She also likes to bang on the piano and make up songs. And play with Groovy Girls. And identify the elements of the periodic table. And she's learning Spanish and Chinese. And she likes to jump on the bed for 30 minutes at a time. You get the picture.

I take every one of her interests seriously. Therefore, we are homeschooling.
RedWine is offline  
#28 of 205 Old 06-28-2006, 06:36 PM
 
SweetMamaMe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 88
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
SweetMamaMe is offline  
#29 of 205 Old 06-28-2006, 06:40 PM
 
True Blue's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Hampton Roads, VA
Posts: 4,626
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
:

Amy, USCG wife and homeschooling, ebfing, homebirthing Mama to M (8), L (6), L (2.5)
True Blue is offline  
#30 of 205 Old 06-28-2006, 06:44 PM - Thread Starter
 
eloquence's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: judgmental wench
Posts: 1,278
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thanks for all of your clarification and personal insights. I suppose it confused me because IRL, I meet women who 'homeschool' and then they go on to tell me the ages. I laughed the first time someone said they were homeschooling their "3 year old". Her reaction told me she was not only serious, but my laughing offended her. I didn't mean to. I just thought it was dry sarcasm on her part.

Your answers helped me understand the trend.

Dar, I consider it parenting too. But this thread has helped me understand, and scared me a little : , what the term preschool homeschool means.

I agree that each family has to do what is right for them.
eloquence is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off