Unschoolers, can we talk about initiating? - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#31 of 56 Old 10-18-2006, 03:07 PM
 
UUMom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 9,207
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
--Anyway, if your idea of strewing involves bringing stuff in from the thrift store and spreading it throughout the house so the kids will have fun discovering it, strew away! And then come strew some cool stuff all over my house, too! --

What can I say? One can get the most gorgeous hardcover children's books for a .69 cents at my Saver's. Other books are not much more.

Is a map on the wall dishonest? Even if the child never said, "Hey, I want a map?" : lol. And when I want the children to know the names of a few presidents, and decide to get those placemats, I will be sure to tell the children so. :-) Promise.
UUMom is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#32 of 56 Old 10-18-2006, 03:12 PM
 
chfriend's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: in a red state
Posts: 4,560
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thanks y'all. I'm getting it that I don't "strew" in the way that others object to (as dishonest). Except for the dishonesty, which is morally objectionable, are there other reasons that putting stuff around that you *wish* your kid was interested in is bad "education?" Does this problem of disinterest in things arise in middle childhood generally?

Some days I'm somewhat desparate for a break from my dd's intense learning needs, so I'm not understanding the other side of it. I was up until almost 11 last night with dd wanting to practice with money values. (Yeah, I know I could say no, but the hunger to learn is geniune. She played with a neighbor kid later than usual....) My kids "academic" advances tend to go in blocks: math, science, reading, spatial stuff, then back around again.

Did anyone else have this experience? How did it change over time for you?
chfriend is offline  
#33 of 56 Old 10-18-2006, 03:15 PM
 
Lillian J's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 8,976
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by UUMom View Post
I don't use the tern 'unschooler' to define what we do, either.
I never did either - I hate to see the way everyone feels the need to label themselves these days. It's just not necessary. - Lillian
Lillian J is offline  
#34 of 56 Old 10-18-2006, 03:18 PM
 
Lillian J's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 8,976
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by UUMom View Post
What's a better description of 'strewing' than to strew carp all over the house so it's not in one overhwhelming pile.
Actually, I think I'd much rather have my carp all in one overwhelming pile - the thought of dead fish scattered all over the house...fwhew... : - Lillian

Lillian J is offline  
#35 of 56 Old 10-18-2006, 03:22 PM
 
Mamma Mia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,837
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm sure some people wouldn't call what I do unschooling, which is why I say we are unschooling-ish.

Sometimes during the week I make a list of ideas of things to do based on my dd is interested in. Different parks (like one with butterfly gardens for example), museums, science centers, activities like bowling, beach trips, art projects to do based on those outings, playdates, etc. Then I ask dd what she wants to do that week and we figure out what days we can fit the things we want to do. I try to compile them into categories, physical movement, humanities, science, etc. I don't actually care if we don't do every category, but this way I list the things together and we plan out our week together and it seems to work out that way more often than not.

I also have a chart for myself that has things like one science project a day, brush teeth (because I will forget!), read at least 3 stories, etc. and I try to check those boxes every day without pushing that stuff on her. It's not hard to get her to settle down for a story because she really enjoys it, but I am less patient than I'd like and *I* need motivation to do it! I try to intitiate one science project per day, which is easy because if nothing "scientific" comes up in our day, there's always a meal or snack to be had that she can help make I can talk while I make it. Those checkboxes are really for me.

Nothing in our planned week or my daily checklist is carved in stone. I really don't invest in the schedule, it's a way for me to be motivated to do those things. I can wake up in the morning and say, "We wrote down that we were going to go to the science center today, do you still want to go? And sometimes she says no. : I feel like it's unschooling because she chooses her activities. The writing down and planning stuff is so that I'll get up and do stuff with her. Because I need the motivation.
Mamma Mia is offline  
#36 of 56 Old 10-18-2006, 03:30 PM
 
folkypoet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: ♫ Twirling ♫
Posts: 593
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by UUMom View Post
Is a map on the wall dishonest? Even if the child never said, "Hey, I want a map?" : lol. And when I want the children to know the names of a few presidents, and decide to get those placemats, I will be sure to tell the children so. :-) Promise.
You know, I actually looked around my house for examples. We've got a huge world map and a smaller U.S. timezones and highways map on the wall next to the kitchen table, we've got presidential placemats, and Kenzie has a collection of Goosebumps and Captain Underpants.

He's a big history and geography buff, so the placemat and maps get used virtually every day. And I have no problem with his choice of reading material, but I've been reading a book recently that makes me out to be some sort of hideous parent for "allowing" my child to read such trash.

It all has to do with intent. I didn't acquire those things because he's not directing his education the way I think it should be directed. But, I did put up the maps and bought the placemat without Kenzie asking for any of it. I just knew it would be helpful to him with his interests. I didn't even ask before I put it all up. Of course, I wasn't just thinking of Kenzie, either. I use those things as much (or more) than he does! I don't know how many times I've shot a quick glance at the placemat to see when a president was in office, or how many times I've checked the map for a country I read about but had no clue where it was located. (I found out I knew of every country in Africa, except one: Mauritania. Why have I never heard of this country before?)

Our world map is laminated, so we've written the populations of different countries all over it. We've had so many cool discussions about time zones, latitude and longitude, population density, the best routes to get somewhere, and a thousand other topics. I highly recomend maps beside the kitchen table! One of the best things we ever did.
folkypoet is offline  
#37 of 56 Old 10-18-2006, 04:21 PM
 
Lillian J's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 8,976
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I just posted this in the "What is strewing?" thread, and it seemed like a good one for here too:
I was just thinking about the fun my son had with some of the things he found strewed.

But I really think they seemed a lot more like his own thing because of the fact that he was picking them out of the pile instead of having them handed to him by me, or having me say anything about the pile of stuff. That's just the way he was - and I think there are others out there like him. We had a great relationship - it's just that he's always valued a certain kind of independence while at the same time valuing my input. A delicate dance. Lillian
Lillian J is offline  
#38 of 56 Old 10-18-2006, 06:05 PM
 
MyLittleWonders's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Always learning something new.
Posts: 7,928
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Okay, from what I'm learning in this thread and my thread called "What is strewing?", it seems that genuine "strewing" involves being in-tuned with your child, realizing that there are things out there that they might not know about (especially the case with younger children such as mine), and bringing such ideas/materials/concepts into their world and environment so they have a chance to experience and learn. I guess I already do some of this ... ds#1 is 5 and although is basically at the intellectual level to read, doesn't really care to at this time. But, he does like playing on the computer and has different "characters" that he enjoys. So, if I'm out and about without him, or even with him, I might pick up an educational ( computer game that I know he'd like but that otherwise he may not have known about because he can't read the titles of computer games yet. Or, while we are at the library, I might check out books about things that he is interested in that otherwise he may not find because they are stacked on the shelves instead of layed out on the table or in bins. We have read cool books like this that he might not otherwise have found. So if this is strewing, I don't see what's wrong with it. I'm not being sneaky or trying to push any agenda on him. If he's not interested, we don't worry about it. If it's a library book, we might read it as a family just for the experience, but it doesn't get pushed. Sometimes ds#2 will be interested instead, and then by sheer peer pressure and not wanting to be left out, ds#1 will listen too. But maybe it just is a matter of definition ... initiate, question, strew ... from what it sounds like, we do all three here.

 Me + dh = heartbeat.gif ds (7/01), ds (11/03), ds (6/06)
and dd born 11/21/10 - our T21 SuperBaby ribbluyel.gif heartbeat.gif
MyLittleWonders is offline  
#39 of 56 Old 10-18-2006, 06:50 PM
 
littlest birds's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: a dream-filled fixer-upper
Posts: 2,894
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
The criticism of strewing--I got the impression that it was in fact intended to avoid influencing the childrens' direction when I first heard of it and I did not quite agree. It had a scent of passive-agressiveness even.

However, I liked the idea a little bit, because I find it handy to get forgotten materials, games, etc. out of storage and put them right out in the open in the hopes one of us will feel inspired to use them or to set fresh books on a table esp. for my ds who won't generally look for anything in the shelf but will pick up visible books and browse them for a long time. I think of it as a rotation arrangement. I don't like lots of clutter, so I try to rotate things in and out of storage instead.

I do initiate and haven't any worries that it is wrong or detrimental, but I actually avoid saying I am an unschooler. I can't figure out if there are any rules to unschooling that I don't follow or not--but nobody can disagree with me if I just don't claim it! I try to do what makes sense as things come up, and do my best to be respectful and recognize and honor the true direction coming from my children. I like to think the benefits are the same anyhow.

ME&treehugger.gifHE... loving our: wild.gifdd(18) ~~violin.gifds(13) read.gifdd(13)~~ peace.gifdd(10)
 
 

littlest birds is offline  
#40 of 56 Old 10-18-2006, 07:02 PM
 
UUMom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 9,207
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lillian J View Post


Actually, I think I'd much rather have my carp all in one overwhelming pile - the thought of dead fish scattered all over the house...fwhew... : - Lillian

lol I always forget you can swear here at MDC. I'm on one list where you can't say the nickname of Richard without it looking like this : ****
UUMom is offline  
#41 of 56 Old 10-20-2006, 08:14 PM
 
hahamommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Exactly where I need to be
Posts: 1,143
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
I've always used the term "strewing" to mean "providing a resource or opportunity without implying that I'm in any way invested in whether it's used or not." Because my older two kids are hyper-sensitive to manipulative intent, reading it into situations where it's honestly not there in the slightest, that means that my strewing has to be very casual.
I think it boils down to intent... if you can offer something directly *without* that nasty attachment then do so; if you want to throw something out, but (like above) you know your own attachment may color the strewed topic, then leave it about and see what happens...
I talk and talk and talk and talk, if someone's willing to listen and my diatribe becomes a conversation, GREAT, if not, I still just talk and talk and talk... just how it works with me as the mom

~diana, whose only true definition of unschooler is: live life as though school never existed!

~diana google me: hahamommy. Unschooling Supermama to Hayden :Super Cool Girlfriend to Scotty . Former wife to Mitch & former mama to Hannahbear
hahamommy is offline  
#42 of 56 Old 10-21-2006, 05:44 AM
 
Purrfect_doll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 122
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Unless you are never in the same room with your child just living life is initiating. I don't conciously do it...but over the course of the day I can look back and see that yes indeed I did say "hey do you want to know more about xyz?" or even a simple "So what do you want to do today?" The simple act of living together and paying attention initiates all sorts of learning. If the OP is asking "Do you conciously make the decision to ask your child xyz or move them to the direction of xyz?" then I would have to say not normally. I do however move in the direction of their cues and provide what I can in the way of helping them accomplish what they set out to do.

As a for instance....my dd is very interested in art right now. The days she sits and draws all day long I ask her questions about her work and if there is anything more she could use to help her with it...(drawing pads, better pencils, how to draw books) or my ds is playing with Pokemon cards all day...I ask him to show me how to play, read me the cards, explain strategy to me etc..

So I'd have to say around here the child initiates the activity I just interface with them.
Purrfect_doll is offline  
#43 of 56 Old 10-21-2006, 06:22 AM
 
Brigianna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: who knows?
Posts: 7,939
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We're not 100% unschoolers, because I do initiate, and teach, and bring up things. But I don't (or try not to) push anything on them. I don't have a problem with saying "do you want to _____?" or "I found this book on _______ you might like." The difference between unschooling and non-unschooling, I think, is that if they say no, I'm okay with that.
Brigianna is offline  
#44 of 56 Old 10-21-2006, 09:19 AM
 
umbrella's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 1,798
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by UnschoolnMa View Post
I bring stuff up, I share, I comment, I offer. It's just normal for us to do that with people in our lives though. Like if I have a friend that I know or suspect is into Star Wars I might let them know about the new Star Wars exhibit at the science center. Or I might tell a friend who has a child interested in space about a cool book or magazine I saw somewhere. Some art thing at the library, a marionette show, a concert, etc. I do the same for my kids.

I am not a strewer. I might bring things into the house I think my kids might enjoy, but I just tell them about it.

same here
umbrella is offline  
#45 of 56 Old 10-21-2006, 09:27 AM
 
KaraBoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Alb-uh-kirk-ee
Posts: 4,481
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
ditto unschoolma and umbrella.

We have varied interests here. When I find something I think she might like, I tell her about it. She can take it further, with or without my help, or not. Just as I would do for a friend or my mate.
KaraBoo is offline  
#46 of 56 Old 10-21-2006, 08:15 PM
 
mammal_mama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Urban Midwestern USA
Posts: 6,378
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
To me unschooling is simply child-directed learning. I see myself as a facilitator: I'm available to help my kids pursue their own interests -- to the degree that they want my help. As some others have pointed out, we the parents are aware of resources our kids are not, so it makes sense for us to mention things our kids might be interested in, such as a book we think they might enjoy. The important thing is to continue being led by their interests as we're introducing a new experience.

If I have a new book I think my six-year-old might enjoy, I'll ask if she'd like to hear it and only read it to her if and when she wants to listen. Then if she's not interested I stop; especially when it's a book I'M introducing, I'll periodically stop and ask if she wants to hear more. She does feel pretty comfortable just stopping me and saying she'd like to read a different book or do something else, and I want her to keep on feeling comfortable; I never want her to pretend to like something just to please me.

I do tell people we're unschoolers, 'cause it just seems our approach to life is so different from that of other homeschoolers; I guess they'd figure it out without me telling them, though. None of my homeschooling friends unschool, and a major part of their energy is focused on "getting" their kids to learn and persuading them to like learning. Those concerns just aren't relevant to me. I realize my oldest is only six, but I find it hard to believe she'll just retreat to her bed and quit learning when she turns nine or thirteen. Of course, I have no problem with keeping the TV off most of the time, so that may be why my kids seem naturally involved in the world around them.

As they get older and want to take certain interests further, I want to help them get involved with apprenticeships, volunteer jobs, or home-based businesses of their choosing. I'll be talking to them about this as they grow, encouraging them to visualize what they'd like to be trying out. I definitely won't force them to do apprenticeships if they don't want to -- but they have such a strong interest in the real world and in doing the things adults do, I can't imagine them suddenly losing interest and NOT wanting to interact with life on some level as they get older.

Truth be told, I probably won't be needing to talk about it that much, if at all. My six-year-old is constantly coming up with business ideas, and loves helping her dad with our worm business. My husband and I are also trying to learn to use a drop-spinner; we'd like to raise Angora rabbits and spin the wool into yarn for our own use and for sale, and I have a feeling both our girls will be interested in this as well. It's just natural for kids to talk about what they want to do in life -- and I'm excited to be able to take my own kids seriously and let them get started now, rather than saying, like my parents said to me, "You've got plenty of time to decide; your job right now is school ..."

Susan -- married unschoolin' WAHMomma to two lovely girls (born 2000 and 2005).
mammal_mama is offline  
#47 of 56 Old 10-21-2006, 10:01 PM
 
tuffykenwell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Northern Ontario
Posts: 1,896
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lillian J View Post

I don't know what's going on with this almost religious attitude toward unschooling these days. People make it so much more complicated for themselves than it has to be. It's just so much more normal than that. I can't imagine tiptoeing around my house like that, afraid of committing an unschooling sin... - Lillian

I agree! And it makes some of us (for example me) more likely to reject unschooling outright as "not for us" because when I hear some people describe it I feel like it sounds so unnatural for us KWIM??

Then other people describe their experiences and I think...well gee we do that most of the time too...but I still won't self identify as an unschooler because I don't want to be accused of not "following the rules" or whatever.

Steph

Steph~~momma to Rhys 2002, Niamh 2004, Isla 2007 and Deirdre 2009
tuffykenwell is offline  
#48 of 56 Old 10-22-2006, 01:54 PM
 
Wildflower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 841
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
I just know that my kids enjoy activities more when they feel that they have initiated them, even if I've helped make it happen behind the scenes by strewing, etc.
Wildflower is offline  
#49 of 56 Old 08-10-2007, 04:46 PM
 
Wugmama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 2,307
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
bumping from a search on unschooling so I can read later...

~Tracy

Rockin' mama to Allison (9), Asher (5) and Alethea (3), head over heels in love with my sexy husband, Tony.

Wugmama is offline  
#50 of 56 Old 08-10-2007, 06:45 PM
 
Lillian J's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 8,976
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Wow, you've beem bumping up a storm - no wonder there were so many unschooling threads here all of a sudden! But if you start clicking on links in some of the threads - like this one: Unschooling? - I think you'll find tons already here to read.

By the way, I keep links bookmarked in my browser - one section is just MDC threads that are individually labeled.

- Lillian
Lillian J is offline  
#51 of 56 Old 08-11-2007, 01:42 PM
 
mammal_mama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Urban Midwestern USA
Posts: 6,378
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
It's funny to read my post of a year ago -- I now let my girls watch all the tv they want, and they're still just as interested in life.

Susan -- married unschoolin' WAHMomma to two lovely girls (born 2000 and 2005).
mammal_mama is offline  
#52 of 56 Old 08-11-2007, 02:05 PM
 
Lillian J's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 8,976
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mammal_mama View Post
It's funny to read my post of a year ago -- I now let my girls watch all the tv they want, and they're still just as interested in life.


Oh, a lot of things said around here will look funny if the posters would have a chance to read them 5 or 10 years from now - or better yet, 15 or 20. I remember how much I thought I knew about children before I had one - and I remember how much I thought I knew about homeschooling before I did it. It's quite amazing sometimes to try to have a conversation about it with somone who has a toddler or very young child and already knows all about how it's supposed to be and going to be. Not talking about you - your comment just set me off on a tangent...

By the way, Mary Griffith is now working on an update of The Homeschooling Handbook - not a revision, but a whole new companion book called Viral Learning in which people who wrote for the first one, and others with 10+ years of experience, will tell what they think about it all now. It was great fun to do my piece - and I can't wait to see everyone else's - because I know many of them and know how much they've changed in guess what direction! Hint: they didn't get more structured.

- Lillian


Lillian J is offline  
#53 of 56 Old 09-06-2007, 04:46 PM
 
AngelBee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: New Brighton, MN
Posts: 19,261
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
:

Mama to 9 so far:Mother of Joey (20), Dominick (13), Abigail (11), Angelo (8), Mylee (6), Delainey (3), Colton (2) and Baby 8 and Baby 9 coming sometime in July 2013.   If evolution were true, mothers would have three arms!

AngelBee is offline  
#54 of 56 Old 09-06-2007, 08:05 PM
 
ZanZansMommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Where the watermelons grow!
Posts: 1,289
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lillian J View Post
By the way, Mary Griffith is now working on an update of The Homeschooling Handbook - not a revision, but a whole new companion book called Viral Learning in which people who wrote for the first one, and others with 10+ years of experience, will tell what they think about it all now. It was great fun to do my piece - and I can't wait to see everyone else's - because I know many of them and know how much they've changed in guess what direction! Hint: they didn't get more structured.

- Lillian


Ooooo... any idea when she'll be done with this?

Lola , loving my DH, Mama to & we &
ZanZansMommy is offline  
#55 of 56 Old 09-06-2007, 08:21 PM
 
UnschoolnMa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Trying to release my cows..Join Me!
Posts: 14,840
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mammal_mama View Post
It's funny to read my post of a year ago -- I now let my girls watch all the tv they want, and they're still just as interested in life.
Isn't the strangest feeling...reading an old post? I (mostly lol) love how things change as we go along. So many things we fear that we just find out weren't all that scary lol.

"The true measure of a man is how he treats a man who can do him absolutely no good."
peace.gif  Embrace the learning that is happening within the things that are actually happening!    
UnschoolnMa is offline  
#56 of 56 Old 09-07-2007, 01:45 AM
 
Lillian J's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 8,976
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Regarding Mary Griffith's new book, Viral Learning: Reflections on the Homeschooling Life,
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZanZansMommy View Post
Ooooo... any idea when she'll be done with this?
Well, I've got some good news, but it's not what I'd been thinking. It just came in the mail today, and I'm so excited that I almost started a thread on it and still might. Although, I've started a dumb rumor . The book, it turns out - and I don't know why I didn't realize all this from the beginning, because I think she made it clear - is actually different than what I'd imagined. In my own defense for my brain glitch, I've had a lot going on in my own life during the period of time during which it was begun, so I guess I just somehow just spaced out.

Anyway, here's her blurb:
"
Now that active homeschooling was coming to an end for our family, I found myself pondering its long-term effects: How different am I from the person I would have been if I'd not been a homeschooling parent? How have my interests and values changed because of our kids learning at home? How are my kids different from their peers?

Suddenly, after all these years, I realized there was another homeschooling book in my head. But this book isn't another guide to how to homeschool, nor is it meant to help homeschooling parents survive the empty-nest syndrome.

This book is personal. It's a reflection on how I (along with a few of my friends) came to homeschooling, how it affected us and our view of the world, and how those changes in us may spark changes around us."
It's really a great read! And even though it's not meant as a "how to homeschool guide," there's an awful lot that actually does speak to those concerns. I look forward to just relaxing and reading it from page 1 instead of flipping through and reading excerpts throughout - but everything I've read so far is fascinating. I really look forward to reading Mary's account of homeschooling with her family - and all the more general observations she makes - because she's a very good writer who always has unique takes on things...

Will tell you more soon. Lillian
[/COLOR]
Lillian J is offline  
Reply

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off