Any Waldorf-insprired HSers looking to get back on the wagon? - Page 3 - Mothering Forums

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Old 12-31-2006, 02:52 AM
 
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I'm here but have been sidetracked the last couple days to the boys being sick. Fortunately dh has one more week of vacation (ironically he's a public school teacher), so I plan on really getting things done around here including some big decluttering and planning/implementing our rhythm/routine.

Question - how many of you are able to be home at least 3 days a week? We have committments 3 of the 5 days, only one of which can be skipped (2x a week speech for ds#2, luckily only 30 minutes each day; breakfast with Grandpa 1x a week; roller skating 1x a week; park day - the one thing that gets ditched if need be). They are all blessings, but I love the rare times when Grandpa isn't available for breakfast or when my mom and I decide to skip one week of skating (or when she just takes ds#2 because ds#1 slept in too late).

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Old 12-31-2006, 03:04 AM
 
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Thanks to all for your posts and sharing so far; I've been reading with interest. I'm new to homeschooling (5 yr old dd, 2 yr old ds) and looking to add some rythm to our days. Many aspects of Waldorf appeal to me. It likely wouldn't work for my family to follow a very directive curriculum. But I really want some printed materials for *some* direction and to get me going (rather than just looking at a million fun websites). Money is limited (I'm ready to buy it all!), so I'd love you to share a few book to really get the juices flowing. Thanks all!

PS--The Winter Wonderfest stuff is just addictively appealing. Thank you, thank you for all your efforts. I'm repeatedly reading and hitting nearly every page!
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Old 12-31-2006, 11:52 AM
 
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I am settling in with the new baby and lost touch with my ideals in the past few months too. My now two year has taken on a host of unwanted rituals to say the least and I too need to get back into a rhythm. I am in!

Jennifer at LillyZoo
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Old 12-31-2006, 12:06 PM
 
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It seems you are the right ladies to ask, so....

Ok, I have to ask ya'all how in the world do you begin? My dd is 3 and ds 19 months. Dd is showing sooooo much interest in crafts right now. She's imitating dh and myself. She is social too. She is hands on. So far ds is more of an auditory learner, but still really young to tell. Where do I even begin. I've been reading up on Waldorf and Enki just recently. I found out there are Waldorf schools where we might move, but after doing more reading I wonder if I really want to send her to school there. I think I would need to just take what works for us (b/c of our faith and their different learning styles, etc). Do you all have any insight/advice?

Thanks a bunch,
January
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Old 12-31-2006, 12:14 PM
 
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I like the early morning walk idea. It gets sooo hot here, and with that sun, that if we don't get out early to play, we often don't get out at all. But a walk as soon as we got up might be nice We don't eat breakfast right away anyway, and the baby can only take so long in the stroller, so maybe we ought to just roll right out of bed and out the door.
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Old 12-31-2006, 01:52 PM
 
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We are starting our first "real" year of Hsing. DS will be 5 in the early Spring. We are doing OM K and adding in things here and there as we see fit. I question K because he meets many of the 1st grade signs such as reaching over his head to touch his ear, and having his first loose tooth. He knows his letters sounds and numbers from a term at primary school here in the UK. I worry about his fine motor skills not being ready for 1st, though I guess doing those things would be good practice.
Michele
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Old 12-31-2006, 02:18 PM
 
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I'd love you to share a few book to really get the juices flowing. Thanks all!
Beyond the Rainbow Bridge: Nurturing our children birth to seven


and Oak Meadow's Preschool Heart of Learning


Read this website:

http://www.waldorfinthehome.org/
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Old 12-31-2006, 03:47 PM
 
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Can I join???? I supose I am not technically a Waldorf Homeschooler . I am Unschool-y for reading ad science, we use Math-U-See and I am Waldorf inspired for art and social studies. I am also pagan and trying very hard to incorporate some daily ritual into our "curriculum" and really get into the holidays and what they truely mean. So obviously I am an eclectic HSer!

We don't yet have a rhythm to our day but we do to our month . We have certain activities and meals and events that revolve on certain days of the week or month or everyother week, etc.

I have been checking out the waldof homeschooling websites. Are there any good Waldorf Homeschooling books you can recommend geared to slightly older children (lower to middle elementary)?
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Old 12-31-2006, 04:30 PM
 
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I have not read all the threads but sure do love your inspiration Annette so I will gladly follow you anywhere....
We too have fallen off the wagon and also unschool but we LOVE Waldorf and if you came into our home you would see Waldorf but also see me unschooling in between.

I am awaiting the new year to bring new breathe and new focus and direction for us all....

Free To Be~
Traci
"Living is learning and when kids are living fully and energetically and happily they are learning a lot, even if we don't always know what it is."
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Old 12-31-2006, 08:41 PM
 
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So, does "back on the wagon" count if you haven't really been officially on the wagon before?

We're still fairly new on our Waldorf journey ... I think it actually started two years ago with your Seasons of Joy books, Annette, and then step by step we've been heading that direction as a family ... I guess we've always been very Waldorf in the decisions we've made and things we've naturally done along the way or been drawn to (well,okay, *mostly*) and have just in the past year realized that there is a name and a theory behind what we do/don't do. We're unschooly, too (is that a word?)

Anyway, all that to say, yes, I'm on the Waldorf wagon

I see a couple of familiar faces from xanga and live journal, too. Hi guys!

Best Wishes!

knit.gifKara~ Rockin' Granola wife to Christopher and mama to J (Nov. '01), M (June '06), L (May '08) and stork-girl.gif (edd 8/3/11)
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Old 12-31-2006, 08:54 PM
 
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One of the things I love about the Waldorf approach is the arts/crafts/drawing emphasis. What do you do if you have a child that just doesn't like to color/draw/paint? I don't push but I keep hoping. So far he does a few craft progects here and there but nothing that would be average for his age (which is 5 BTW, and he does very little that is "average" for his age, LOL). He is very creative but not into hand on crafts and art.
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Old 12-31-2006, 09:04 PM
 
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My oldest preferred acting out stories to drawing them. Also, it can be fun to make little creatures out of beeswax, felt, etc.--even for the non-drawer.

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Originally Posted by amseiler View Post
One of the things I love about the Waldorf approach is the arts/crafts/drawing emphasis. What do you do if you have a child that just doesn't like to color/draw/paint? I don't push but I keep hoping. So far he does a few craft progects here and there but nothing that would be average for his age (which is 5 BTW, and he does very little that is "average" for his age, LOL). He is very creative but not into hand on crafts and art.
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Old 12-31-2006, 09:07 PM
 
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It seems you are the right ladies to ask, so....

Ok, I have to ask ya'all how in the world do you begin? My dd is 3 and ds 19 months. Dd is showing sooooo much interest in crafts right now. She's imitating dh and myself. She is social too. She is hands on. So far ds is more of an auditory learner, but still really young to tell. Where do I even begin. I've been reading up on Waldorf and Enki just recently. I found out there are Waldorf schools where we might move, but after doing more reading I wonder if I really want to send her to school there. I think I would need to just take what works for us (b/c of our faith and their different learning styles, etc). Do you all have any insight/advice?

Thanks a bunch,
January
Anyone?
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Old 12-31-2006, 09:47 PM
 
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I have been checking out the waldof homeschooling websites. Are there any good Waldorf Homeschooling books you can recommend geared to slightly older children (lower to middle elementary)?

Hey AM,

This is the second time in the past two days I've run into folks asking about starting with older kids. Here are a few ideas for books:

A Steiner Homeschool? (from Golden Beetle) is my fave

Waldorf Education: A Family Guide

Waldorf Education: Teaching from the Inside Out

Millennial Child

Plus, a whole lot of the different web resources/curricula.

7ish-13ish is the time when you are truly sharing learning together. There's a lot to the older elementary/middle school stage, IMHO, it centers around the nine-year change, but should be a balanced time between independent learning and your teaching. Here are my thoughts on this stage: Avid Treasure Seekers

To me, the key is right in the middle of the page, "build a bridge between the imagination of childhood and the later abstractions of adult thinking." And a key is reverence, while helping the child to grow fully into himself.

This stage so important because by the time they are teens, we're just sort of support posts for their very independent growth.

Best wishes,

Lucie
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Old 12-31-2006, 09:57 PM
 
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Anyone?
Yes. DO just take the parts that appeal to you, and leave the rest behind. We mix MI/Waldorf/Unschooling with a solid dose of holistic science and wonder.

There's so much to be said for laying an imaginative, wonder-filled foundation at that age - my own ideas and links to some great articles are here, and I'm sure AnnetteMarie and others will have more insight.

I would say to pick up a book called A Child's Seasoal Treasury since she loves the crafts, also You Are Your Child's First Teacher or Rainbow Bridge. There are also a lot of holistic crafts online. Join a playgroup or homeschool group that focuses oin outdoor activities - such as at park or arboretum. Enjoy peaceful, rhythmic days together, and share both the wonder and the work of life.

Best wishes,

Lucie
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Old 01-01-2007, 01:10 AM
 
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One of the things I love about the Waldorf approach is the arts/crafts/drawing emphasis. What do you do if you have a child that just doesn't like to color/draw/paint? I don't push but I keep hoping. So far he does a few craft progects here and there but nothing that would be average for his age (which is 5 BTW, and he does very little that is "average" for his age, LOL). He is very creative but not into hand on crafts and art.
Just wanted to share an experience I had with my ds. Granted, he's only 2 1/2, but... I noticed he would never draw at the table when I gave him and my dd (4) crayons, markers, or colored pencils. We don't do coloring books, only plain paper, so I wondered if he might like a coloring sheet or whatever, but he didn't respond to that, either. It wasn't until I gave him an easel with a chalkboard and dry erase board that he showed interest in drawing. He just likes to make his drawings while standing! I can also clip paper to it for him to make more permanent artwork.

me luxlove.gif+ dh kewl.gif= dd reading.gif , ds mischievous.gif , ds2 biggrinbounce.gif, dd2 baby.gif
 
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Old 01-01-2007, 01:35 AM
 
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. It wasn't until I gave him an easel with a chalkboard and dry erase board that he showed interest in drawing. He just likes to make his drawings while standing! I can also clip paper to it for him to make more permanent artwork.
I have been thinking about getting one of these. Maybe I will give that a try. Thanks

AM
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Old 01-01-2007, 01:36 AM
 
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Hey AM,

This is the second time in the past two days I've run into folks asking about starting with older kids. Here are a few ideas for books:
Thank you, I will check those out.

AM
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Old 01-01-2007, 02:50 AM
 
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Yes. DO just take the parts that appeal to you, and leave the rest behind. We mix MI/Waldorf/Unschooling with a solid dose of holistic science and wonder.

There's so much to be said for laying an imaginative, wonder-filled foundation at that age - my own ideas and links to some great articles are here, and I'm sure AnnetteMarie and others will have more insight.

I would say to pick up a book called A Child's Seasoal Treasury since she loves the crafts, also You Are Your Child's First Teacher or Rainbow Bridge. There are also a lot of holistic crafts online. Join a playgroup or homeschool group that focuses oin outdoor activities - such as at park or arboretum. Enjoy peaceful, rhythmic days together, and share both the wonder and the work of life.

Best wishes,

Lucie
Thank you for your reply! I will check out your site and those books! What a journey it is to prepare yourself to even start to think about h'schooling!:
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Old 01-01-2007, 09:31 AM
 
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It seems you are the right ladies to ask, so....

Ok, I have to ask ya'all how in the world do you begin? My dd is 3 and ds 19 months. Dd is showing sooooo much interest in crafts right now. She's imitating dh and myself. She is social too. She is hands on. So far ds is more of an auditory learner, but still really young to tell. Where do I even begin. I've been reading up on Waldorf and Enki just recently. I found out there are Waldorf schools where we might move, but after doing more reading I wonder if I really want to send her to school there. I think I would need to just take what works for us (b/c of our faith and their different learning styles, etc). Do you all have any insight/advice?

Thanks a bunch,
January
For very young children, I think you begin by working to establish healthy rhythms to your day. Resist the temptation to get the kids involved in all sorts of outside activities, and work on setting up a simple daily and weekly schedule. For example, your daily schedule could be something like this: breakfast, walk, housework, lunch, nap, art, dinner, bed. Then set up a weekly schedule so that you esstablish a routine for your activity period (coloring monday, painting tues etc..) This is just a simple example, but the key is to make slow and steady changes, and to start from what you are already doing. We had a pretty set routine of walking to the campus dining hall for lunch everyday, so instead of trying to do a morning walk (which can be brutal in New England) I scheduled our walk just before lunch.

Learn a few simple songs and verses to accompany your routine. This seems hokey at first, if you haven't done much of it, but children really respond. Sing the same song everytime you head for the bathtub, or everytime you begin cleaning up, or everytime you begin setting out crayons or paint. There are tons of songs to choose from, but I would just choose two or three and work on using them everyday.

For practical life, I think decluttering and shutting off the tv help immensely. Create simple play spaces with imaginative, open ended toys. And get little mops and brooms and feather dustersf or the kids to help with housework (they love this)! See this site for inexpensive child sized tools.

www.forsmallhands.com

My favorite resources for this age goup are Annette's downloads and Donna Simmon's Kindergarten with your three to six year old.

http://www.christopherushomeschool.o...ndergarten.htm

These are wonderful, inexpensive resources that contain all the info you need to get started.
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Old 01-01-2007, 09:39 AM
 
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I have been checking out the waldof homeschooling websites. Are there any good Waldorf Homeschooling books you can recommend geared to slightly older children (lower to middle elementary)?
Donna Simmons has audio downloads for each elementary grade. They are only $12 each and full of helpful info. Scroll down for a list of all the audio downloads.

http://www.christopherushomeschool.org/bookstore.htm

Her Joyful Movement, and Natural Science books are also great for the lower elementary grades.
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Old 01-01-2007, 11:57 AM
 
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Hey Lucie (and others in the know)--
What's "MI"? Thanks!
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Old 01-01-2007, 01:58 PM
 
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For very young children, I think you begin by working to establish healthy rhythms to your day. Resist the temptation to get the kids involved in all sorts of outside activities, and work on setting up a simple daily and weekly schedule. For example, your daily schedule could be something like this: breakfast, walk, housework, lunch, nap, art, dinner, bed.
Wow! Thank you for that response! That is very helpful. This part is what I'll have a hard time w/. We go stir crazy w/o outside activity/play. Maybe doing the daily walk will combat that. Plus, my first thought when I read this is "and then what? what about all the fill in time that my kids want to be doing something?" i guess that's when i encourage them to play, use their imagination, or do activities/crafts at home?!

Thanks again for your insight. It was needed as I've been sitting here trying to figure out a schedule for the next few months. I think this will change a few things.

Edited to add...I looked up the websites...what great ideas of things to do w/the kids. That's what I've been needing!
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Old 01-01-2007, 04:31 PM
 
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Hey OakDale!

It's Multiple Intelligence theory - which is essentuially the idea that each child is gifted in his or her own way. The theory looks at different types of intelligence and the ways the different children learn - learning styles. Howard Gardner was the pioneer in this, and any of his books are good introductions. He started with seven intelligences, then added an eighth to include: linguisic, logical, spacial, kinesthetic, musical, intrapersonal, interpersonal, and naturalist...but I think more recently even more have been added.

To me, it has been much more useful in my everyday teaching than the Waldorf temperaments idea, though I have read up on temperaments and do think about it a bit. The MI theory, on the other hand, is something I use a LOT when deciding how to approach something - really daily.

If you want to learn more about MI, here are some resources.

Happy New Year!

Lucie
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Old 01-01-2007, 06:11 PM
 
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I have been checking out the waldof homeschooling websites. Are there any good Waldorf Homeschooling books you can recommend geared to slightly older children (lower to middle elementary)?


Check this site for reviews of Waldorfy books, curricula, etc.:

http://www.waldorfresources.org/
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Old 01-01-2007, 10:25 PM
 
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Lucie and Jessica...

Well, you have inspired me! I just needed somone or a few ppl to point me in the right direction and give me a little nudge. Lucie, I have been reading through your website tonight and it's wonderful. We are not Catholic, but LDS Christians so it helps a lot. I just have to write how my day went b/c I just have to it was so wonderful. After I read your posts this morning it just completely changed my thinking and made me look at my children and our day differently.

We had breakfast, took baths and got dressed. Then we did some cleaning w/the kids trailing me and helping as I'd turn picking things up into a game. We loaded up in the car and my dd decided she wanted her new car seat (Britax Boulevard for Christmas), so why not, right? I grabbed it and as I installed it I taught her things and she "helped" as ds looked on. When that was done, we went to Whole Foods. What was fun and different about this today, you ask? We decided to bring our little grocery cart (one that is real, but small from Costco...really nice) with us. So, mom had a big cart w/ds in it and dd had her little cart. We strolled through WF and I just conversed w/them and asked questions and taught them things as we went through. DD talked to ppl and everyone thought it was great. Then we ate lunch there. My dc fell asleep on the way home, so they napped in the car while I re-arranged some things in the house to help w/doing crafts, etc w/them. When they woke up we had snack and made up a sharing song. Then I decided to clean out the van. The kids got to play in the car as I did this and they had a blast. DH took them on a walk as I finished up. Then, we did finger paints at the table and as dd continued, ds went in the sling and I made dinner (dd usually likes to help make dinner, but was having way too much fun). Now ds is in the bath w/DH watching and dd is playing in the big Britax box as her "house" w/her animals and she's wearing fairy wings. We'll soon start bedtime routine and put them to sleep in our sleeping room! Of course we said our prayers throughout the day and will read Bible stories tonight. Anytime anything came up today about Jesus or God we freeling discussed them. (right now I hear dh explaining how Jesus died for our sins) I realize how I don't need to change the way we do things, but make other things work for us.

Now, can every day be like this? As we go forward, I will continue a routine similar to today changing things as I need (when to take a walk or days we have gymnastics, etc). I can be flexable w/it. I'll also add in new "toys" and material as I get more into Waldorf and Enki and etc... I also have Brite Music and we listen to that as well.

If anyone has any advice, feel free. Thanks for reading and letting me "vent" in a good way. I think this is my longest post ever! :


January
-a mom who finally sees how she can "homeschool".
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Old 01-01-2007, 11:38 PM - Thread Starter
 
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mimiharshe, that was beautiful, and very inspiring!

Does anyone know of any Waldorf sites that are having sales or free shipping? I want to get some main lesson books.

Also, do we want to make this a monthly thing and start a January thread? I'm really digging the comradery and friendship here, and would love to make this an ongoing this!

Flowers, fairies, gardens, and rainbows-- Seasons of Joy: 10 weeks of crafts, handwork, painting, coloring, circle time, fairy tales, and more!
Check out the blog for family fun, homeschooling, books, simple living, and 6 fabulous children, including twin toddlers

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Old 01-01-2007, 11:39 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Oh, and I forgot to say, I had a real heart-to-heart with DH, who was concerned that I was sort of flitting from one thing to another. I feel like we really understand one another now, and he totally supports this move back to more Waldorf-inspired living. He also gave me the go-ahead to pull Katie Grace from the charter school ASAP (originally we were going to wait til around March.) So- W00t!

Flowers, fairies, gardens, and rainbows-- Seasons of Joy: 10 weeks of crafts, handwork, painting, coloring, circle time, fairy tales, and more!
Check out the blog for family fun, homeschooling, books, simple living, and 6 fabulous children, including twin toddlers

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Old 01-02-2007, 12:30 AM
 
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I think a monthly thread would be great!
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Old 01-02-2007, 12:41 AM
 
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Originally Posted by jessicaSAR View Post

For practical life, I think decluttering and shutting off the tv help immensely. Create simple play spaces with imaginative, open ended toys. And get little mops and brooms and feather dustersf or the kids to help with housework (they love this)! .[/I]
I certainly second this! We recently did a big toy de-clutter, slowly replacing the non-quality toys with more natural open ended toys and cleaning out the playspace. It was a big eye opener to me because a) her play changed considerably (it seems just less "aggressive" to me if that makes sense ... gentler, more peaceful, with more involved and detailed stories to it) and b) she actually plays IN the playroom. I think before it was SO cluttered and there were SO many toys to choose from that she was overwhelmed. Scaling down has been one of the best things we have done so far on our Waldorf journey.

I've also been quite tickled at how much she loves to *really* sweep with her real dustpan and broom. A feather duster is also awesome!

As far as adding rhythm, as a person who is very non-schedule oriented, it certainly helped me to give myself the freedom to not feel bound by the clock, like say breakfast always at 7:30. Instead, it truly is a "rhythm" like breakfast after we get dressed ... we follow more of a flow. I know that may sound trivial, but for someone like me who just hates watches and clocks it is better for me to just flow through the day. Bit by bit I added things like a routine for the week (watercolor on Monday, Handwork on Wednesday) and slowly our rhythms have evolved. For us that worked better than trying to adapt all at once. Some people may be able to do that but I'm certainly not one of them

I have found that www.waldorfcurriculum.com has a fantastic free preschool curriculum and lots of neat units in the resource section, too. We have taken these one at a time and that is how we are building our collection of books and toys (some toys we're making ourselves together and Boo loves this!) by simply purchasing or making the few materials required for each unit. I've had great success finding many books at the library, too. I think it can be a little overwhelming when one is first encountering Waldorf because there is an abundance of riches in the great materials, playthings, lessons, books, etc out there. I know that I felt like we had to have all this great stuff right now, you know? please, tell me I'm not the only impulsive one out there like this But, really, going slowly - like how we removed the junky toys bit by bit - seems to be a natural and easy way to flow into Waldorf. I know my daughter is responding wonderfully by this gradual change in our lives, too instead of a sudden, radical switch.

I also very much like Annette's Season of Joy materials, too! They were my first taste of Waldorf (THANK YOU!) and I found the ideas within them very easy to blend into my family's lives and rhythm bit by bit.

Okay, I'm super chatty tonight. Thanks for reading along this far and thanks for this thread. I was mighty happy to stumble across it!

PS - I would really like a monthly thread! It would be great for going back in the archives for seasonal ideas, too.

knit.gifKara~ Rockin' Granola wife to Christopher and mama to J (Nov. '01), M (June '06), L (May '08) and stork-girl.gif (edd 8/3/11)
2011:  a year to Make Do, Do Without, or Do It Ourselves 
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